This Portable Coffee Machine Makes Cold Brew in Four Minutes Flat

Taveesaksri, iStock / Getty Images Plus
Taveesaksri, iStock / Getty Images Plus

If you've ever made cold brew coffee at home, you know that though it's an easy process, it takes a long time. Like, really long. But what if your craving for a refreshing glass of iced coffee wasn’t immediately dashed away by the realization that, if you wanted cold brew, you would’ve had to start making it at least 12 hours ago?

With the G-Presso, you’ll never have to feel that disappointment again. The innovative coffeemaker, available now on Kickstarter, uses a gyro-pressed extraction method to transform your water and coffee grounds into summer’s hottest cold drink in an impressive four minutes flat.

All you have to do is add coffee grounds (a fine grind will create a bold, intense flavor, while a medium grind will give you more mild coffee) and up to five cups of water. Then press the power button on top of the machine and watch the G-Presso work its magic.

Here’s how it does it: The porous container with the coffee grounds inside spins rapidly, while the water above filters through it. The pressure created by the centrifugal force releases the coffee’s full-body sweetness and flavor in a fraction of the time it would take for that process to happen on its own. Your coffee will also be topped with a rich crema, similar to what you see on top of an espresso shot (which you don’t normally get with regular cold brew).

You might think that such a fast-paced, energy-filled process would generate a lot of noise, but the developers at Camfron Co. wanted to make sure they didn’t ruin your tranquil summer mornings (or afternoons) with a buzzsaw-esque whirring, so they created a noise-blocking silicon pad for the G-Presso to sit on.

The G-Presso is powered by three AAA batteries, making it perfect for bringing to a friend’s house, on vacation, or anywhere else you might need a cool, caffeinated pick-me-up but don't have room for a full-on coffee machine. For cold weather or frigid apartments, you can certainly opt for hot coffee instead—just use boiling water.

But you don’t have to limit your choices to cold or hot coffee. The G-Presso comes with a milk whisk that magnetically connects to the detachable control stick from the water container, giving you the ability to froth your way to the latte of your dreams.

Prices for the G-Presso start at $64 (which includes one machine, one extra basket, and 90 grams of ground coffee) for August delivery. You can view additional buying options on Kickstarter.

While you wait for your G-Presso to arrive, check out some other home-brewing coffee hacks here. And if you plan on drinking a lot of cold brew this summer, you may want to invest in a tumbler and reusable straws to make your coffee addiction a little more eco-friendly.

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General Mills Is Recalling More Than 600,000 Pounds of Gold Medal Flour Over E. Coli Risk

jirkaejc/iStock via Getty Images
jirkaejc/iStock via Getty Images

The FDA recently shared news of a 2019 product recall that could impact home bakers. As CNN reports, General Mills is voluntarily recalling 600,000 pounds of its Gold Medal Unbleached All-Purpose Flour due to a possible E. coli contamination.

The decision to pull the flour from shelves was made after a routine test of the 5-pound bags. According to a company statement, "the potential presence of E. coli O26" was found in the sample, and even though no illnesses have been connected to Gold Medal flour, General Mills is recalling it to be safe.

Escherichia coli O26 is a dangerous strain of the E. coli bacterium that's often spread through commercially processed foods. Symptoms include abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Most patients recover within a week, but in people with vulnerable immune systems like young children and seniors, the complications can be deadly.

To avoid the potentially contaminated batch, look for Gold Medal flour bags with a "better if used by" date of September 6, 2020 and the package UPC 016000 196100. All other products sold under the Gold Medal label are safe to consume.

Whether or not the flour in your pantry is affected, the recall is a good reminder that consuming raw flour can be just as harmful as eating raw eggs. So when you're baking cookies, resist having a taste until after they come out of the oven—or indulge in one of the many edible cookie dough products on the market instead.

[h/t CNN]

The World's Spiciest Chip Is Sold Only One to a Customer

Paqui
Paqui

If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to get pepper-sprayed directly in your mouth, Paqui Chips has something you can’t afford to miss. Following the success of their Carolina Reaper Madness One Chip Challenges back in 2016 and 2017, Food & Wine reports that the company has re-released the sadistic snack. Continuing their part-marketing gimmick, part-public safety effort, the Reaper chip won’t be sold in bags. You just get one chip.

That’s because Paqui dusts its chips with the Carolina Reaper Pepper, considered the world’s hottest, and most (attempted) consumers of the chip report being unable to finish even one. To drive home the point of how hot this chip is—it’s really, extremely, punishingly hot—the chip is sold in a tiny coffin-shaped box

Peppers like the Carolina Reaper are loaded with capsaicin, a compound that triggers messages of heat and pain and fiery consumption; your body can respond by vomiting or having shortness of breath. While eating the chip is not the same as consuming the bare, whole pepper, it’s still going to be a very uncomfortable experience. For a profanity-filled example, you can check out this video:

The chip will be sold only on Paqui’s website for $6.99 per chip or $59.90 for a 10-pack. The company also encourages pepper aficionados to upload photos or video of their attempts to finish the chip. If it becomes too much, try eating yogurt, honey, or milk to dampen the effects.

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