11 Art Greats Who Started Out as Street Artists

Carl Court/Getty Images
Carl Court/Getty Images

Several iconic artists got their start on the street, and many still put up work outdoors even as they show their art indoors, at some of the world’s most exclusive galleries and museums. Here are 11 of those art greats who pull double duty.

1. SHEPARD FAIREY

60-foot mural in Detroit, Michigan.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In 1989, while a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, Shepard Fairey created a stencil featuring Andre the Giant. Disseminated by and through the skateboarding community, variations of the image in black, white, and red, many with the word “obey,” quickly appeared around the world. Fairey’s Obey Giant posters, stickers, and stencils subsequently became some of the most recognizable street art ever made. In 2008, his poster featuring Barack Obama and the word “hope,” part of the US presidential campaign, became even more iconic. The Smithsonian acquired the mixed media portrait shortly before Obama’s inauguration, and in 2009 Fairey had his first solo show at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. 

2. GAIA

mural entitled 'Spettacolo Rinnovamento Maturita' by Gaia
Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images

A self-described “white kid from the Upper East Side,” Gaia belongs on this list for the amount he’s already achieved. By the time he’d graduated from college in 2011, he’d gained fame for his fantastical wheatpastes of animals and people, generally exploring themes of gentrification and environmental degeneration, and he’d had exhibitions at galleries in Los Angeles, Portland, and Washington, D.C. Since then, he has twice curated Open Walls Baltimore, a well-regarded festival devoted to murals by such street artists as Chris Stain and Nanook, and opened his first big solo show at the Baltimore Museum of Art.  

3. BANKSY

People photograph a Banksy artwork opposite the French embassy
Carl Court/Getty Images

Probably the most famous street artist in the world, Banksy began creating socially conscious, satirical stencils in his native Bristol, UK, in the early 1990s. He’s come a long way since then: his street art has become so valuable that it regularly gets chipped out of walls or stolen. In summer 2014, Sotheby’s held an “unauthorized” retrospective, with some pieces priced at £500,000. Banksy has surreptitiously hung his work at the Louvre, the Tate Modern, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, even as he has put on authorized shows at galleries and museums. His real name remains unknown.   

4. JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT

Boy and Dog in a Johnnypump
Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

No one quite knew what to make of such spraypainted slogans as “SAMO© as an escape clause” or “SAMO© for the so-called avant garde” when they first appeared around Downtown Manhattan in 1976. SAMO stood for “same old shit,” and was a collaboration between Jean-Michel Basquiat and two friends. He killed off SAMO by writing “SAMO is dead” in 1979, then fully turned his attention to the neo-expressionist paintings that made him famous. Boasting vivid colors and human anatomy, and sometimes incorporating wordsa throwback to Basquiat’s days as a graffiti writerthey have been shown around the world, including at the Whitney Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.  

5. KEITH HARING

keith haring art
Anne-Christine Poujoulant/AFP/Getty Images

As a student at the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1980, Keith Haring began executing quick drawings in white chalk on the black matte paper found in subway stations. These “subway drawings” helped him hone his signature style of squiggles, figures, and symbols. He had his first solo show in Soho, at the Tony Shafrazi Gallery, in 1982. Haring went on to exhibit work at the Venice Biennale, Whitney Biennial, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Hirshhorn Museum, among other venues; to execute large-scale public works projects; and to open his very own retail store before his death in 1990. 

6. JR

art by JR in germany
John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images

Famous for his way-larger-than-life photographic portraits pasted around neighborhoods, JR started taking pictures of street art after finding a camera in the Paris Métro. But it wasn’t until he started photographing people, including young men in impoverished Parisian suburbs, and pasting the photos illegally in public spaces, that his career took off. In 2011, he used his TED prize money to start Inside Out, a global art project that “transform[s] messages of personal identity into works of art” by letting everyday people take and submit photographs of community members, which are then transformed into posters. JR has shown his work at galleries and museums in Shanghai, London, Berlin, and Los Angeles.    

7. LADY PINK

Lady Pink began tagging at age 15. Along with street artists like Lee Quiñones and Fab 5 Freddy, she starred in the 1983 movie Wild Style, about hip hop and graffiti in New York City. In time she moved from doing stylized versions of her name to executing full-scale murals and fine art, frequently featuring female figures and imagery from the natural world, especially plants. In 1984, at age 21, she had her first solo show at the Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia. Her paintings have since been acquired by the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

8. BARRY MCGEE

urban street art installation 'One More Thing' by Barry McGee
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Barry McGee plastered the streets of San Francisco, his hometown, and elsewhere with the name “Twist” as a young man in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, he shows multimedia installations, drawings, and paintings under his given name, Barry McGee, at museums like the Walker Art Center and Tokyo’s Watari Museum of Contemporary Art. His work taps into questions of identity and consumerism, often features sad sack men, and contains graphical, brightly colored elements. In 2013, as the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston prepared a mid-career retrospective of his work, McGee told the New York Times that various circumstances have caused him to pull back from the street: “I just don’t have time . . . It’s really hard at a certain age to keep up that lifestyle.”     

9. OLEK

Olek moved to New York City in 2000, shortly after graduating from college in her native Poland, where, she has said, she “grew up in a place with no colors.” Sleepless at a friend’s apartment on Christmas Eve in 2003, Olek began crocheting whatever she found in the refrigerator; she not only gave herself a way to pass the long night but also discovered her artistic calling. Olek has since crocheted a double-decker bus, grocery carts, the results of an ex’s STD test, and the Wall Street bull, among other objects both mundane and extraordinary. A 2012 show at the Smithsonian featured the crocheted contents of her entire apartment.

10. RETNA

You can almost always identify a RETNA piece at a glance, because of its signature blend of calligraphy, hieroglyphics, and historical typography. His work on the street and in galleries plays with the notion of tagging. Much as some tags are only discernible to a select few, his work can be unintelligible unless you know the code of this highly idiosyncratic alphabet. He told The Economist’s blog that his script consists of “names my mom would call me when I was growing up, and some are things I’m talking about, friends who have passed away—they’re interactions with what’s going on with people that I just meet, or a conversation I just had. I hear a word or a phrase or a dialogue, and then that becomes my response. They all say something.” He has put on shows in New York, Los Angeles, and Venice. 

11. SWOON

 mural by US artist Swoon
Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images

Caledonia Dance Curry was a student at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute when she started putting up wheatpastes of her friends, family, and neighbors around New York City in 1999. Sensitive without being sentimental, moving without being maudlin, delicate even as they start to decay, these portraits appeared in abandoned buildings and other out-of-the-way spots. By 2005, she was well known as Swoon, and her work was exhibited or collected by such institutions as the Museum of Modern Art and Art Basel in Miami Beach. In 2014, she created a site-specific installation at the Brooklyn Museum that included a raft made from NYC garbage along with a 65-foot tree made from ribbon and paper.   

Art

Brie Larson Punched an Old Woman in the Captain Marvel Trailer—This Might Explain Why

Marvel Studios via YouTube
Marvel Studios via YouTube

by Natalie Zamora

Marvel fans have been on cloud nine all day, a​s the first official trailer for the highly-anticipated film Captain Marvel was ​released this morning. Besides seeing Carol Danvers (a.k.a. Captain Marvel) in Air Force and her awesome suit, one quick shot certainly threw us off.

Toward the end of the trailer, ​Captain Marvel punches an innocent-looking elderly woman on a train, after the woman simply gave the superhero a smile. Upon first watch, we were so confused, and so were tons who took to social media to ask about it.

However, there is a pretty simple presumed explanation for Carol Danvers's action.

As Carol is back on Earth, she has to readjust to the planet she barely even remembers coming from. She's obviously rattled upon getting on the train, and when one person makes eye contact with her, she interprets it as danger. Comic book fans know Carol's dealt with Skrulls, which are shape-shifting aliens. We're assuming she thinks this poor old woman is one of them, and honestly, we can't blame her.

We don't have proof that this is what's going on, and Carol could technically just have some seriously bad anger issues we're not aware of, but we're pretty confident in this assumption, and so are tons of fans.

We'll find out what really happens when Captain Marvel hits theaters March 8, 2019.

Glow-in-the-Dark Star Wars Undies Have Arrived

MeUndies
MeUndies

Star Wars geekery has been taken to the next level. Underwear brand MeUndies just unveiled a new pattern that bears the likenesses of several of the space opera's most iconic characters and glows like a lightsaber when it gets dark outside.

The original pattern was hand-drawn by the MeUndies team, and it features Chewbacca, Yoda, R2-D2, C-3PO, Darth Vader, and a Stormtrooper. According to the company, it’s the first time a Star Wars print has featured characters from both the Dark Side and the Rebel Alliance together.

And naturally, the stars and Star Wars logos glow in the dark. The underwear is made from a fiber called Lenzing MicroModal, which is derived from beechwood trees and is said to be three times softer than cotton.

Star Wars boxers for men
MeUndies

Star Wars panties for women
MeUndies

Men’s undies, priced at $24, come in four styles: trunks, boxers, briefs, and boxer briefs. Women’s options include a cheeky brief, bikini, or boyshort, all of which cost $18 apiece. However, if you sign up for a MeUndies membership, $4 to $8 will be taken off each pair, and you’ll also gain access to exclusive prints and lower member prices. MeUndies carries sizes ranging from XS to 3XL and ships to the U.S. and Canada, as well as some other international locations.

Head on over to the MeUndies website to pick up a pair for yourself or for the Star Wars fanatic in your life, and remember: When you wear these undies, the Force will be with you, always.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER