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TheFineBros, Youtube

Elderly People React to Oculus Rift

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TheFineBros, Youtube

After asking a group of game elders to test out Google Glass, the Fine Brothers upped the ante on futuristic technology of today and showed them Oculus Rift, a virtual reality device (and not a rock group like one lady assumed). The elders had no idea what they were dealing with. "I'm not going to electrocute myself, am I?" one asked.

Many thought it was a protective mask of some sort—for space or snorkeling or war or for preventing spread of the Ebola virus—while some thought it might be a mind control device. One compared it to old-school Viewfinders.

Once the device was turned on, all of the elders loved exploring the virtual villa in Tuscany. "It's like you're there!" One woman commented. But things got a little dicey at the amusement park. Sure, the roller coaster isn't real, but as one lady shrieked, "My stomach doesn't know that!" Despite some run-ins with motion sickness and a-little-too-real-for-comfort horror experience, they all expressed amazement at how far technology has come in their lifetimes.

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Things You Didn't Know Came From Massachusetts
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The Bay State may be small, but it's definitely pulling its weight when it comes to cool creations.

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environment
How Overfishing Threatens the World's Oceans—and What We Can Do About It
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iStock

Fish populations around the globe are in serious trouble, thanks to the modern fishing industry. Instead of simply using poles and intuition, factory ships employ radar, sonar, helicopters, and even spotter planes to hunt down schools of fish, which they catch using massive nets and lines studded with hundreds of hooks. These technologies allow us to snare all kinds of deep-water delicacies—but they come with an ecological cost, according to TED-Ed’s video below.

Learn how overfishing harms the environment—and what we can do to protect our oceans—by listening to marine biologist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and environmental studies scholar Jennifer Jacquet’s lesson below.

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