15 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About The Marine 3: Homefront

Even if you missed the first two installments of The Marine, the third film is great fun for any action buff who knows their stuff.

1. The star knew how to act violent.

Mike Mizanin is actually a professional wrestler for the WWE who goes by the stage name “The Miz.” The Marine 3 is his first movie.

2. But the Miz was comfortable in front of the camera.

Before the Miz was a wrestler he appeared as a cast member on the tenth season of the long-running reality show The Real World.

3. The Rock did some coaching.

Before taking on his first starring film role, Mizanin told ESPN that he texted former WWE superstar Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson for advice. Johnson allegedly told Mizanin to “act natural, have fun, enjoy the scenes, and enjoy yourself.”

4. The Miz got the role in a disqualification victory.

WWE Superstar Randy Orton was originally slated to star in The Marine 3, but he was dropped from the movie because he was dishonorably discharged from the actual U.S. Marine Corps in 1999.

5. Filming was quick.

Production on The Marine 3 lasted only 20 days. Conveniently, half of the shooting schedule took place on the partially sunken ferry that functions as the villain’s hideout.

6. The ferry had a real history.

The ferry is called The Queen of Sidney, which carried passengers between Vancouver and Vancouver Island when it launched in 1959. It was decommissioned and sold in 2001, and has since sat abandoned on the Fraser River in nearby Mission, British Columbia. In 2012, the vessel was deemed an environmental risk by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment and was seized by the government in order to secure the surrounding natural habitat and the vessel’s safety.

7. The ferry knows how to play supporting roles for wrestlers.

It had previously appeared in the “Stone Cold” Steve Austin film Damage.

8. Rain wasn’t on the film’s side.

The ferry location on the Fraser River flooded so often that the production used a cargo truck originally meant to appear in the movie to transport the cast and crew over flooded areas to get to the set.

9. Director Scott Wiper has a close working relationship with the WWE.

He previously directed The Condemned, which starred Austin.

10. The movie went through a ton of blank ammo.

The production allegedly fired an average of 10,000 rounds each day.

11. Clint Eastwood inspired the Miz.

As a reference for the main character of Sgt. Jake Carter, Wiper had Mizanin use Eastwood’s “Man with No Name” character from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly and Eastwood’s work in Dirty Harry for inspiration.

12. The Miz had one very long match.

The hand-to-hand fight between Jake Carter and the henchman named Cazel (played by actor Darren Shahlavi) wasn’t pre-planned, and the moves of the fight were made up on the day. The scene took 5 hours to block and 2 hours to shoot.

13. The Miz took a brutal injury.

During one of the fight scenes, Mizanin lost a toenail when a door kicked by a stuntperson hit him in the foot. “I’ve never felt pain like this before in all my life,” he told ESPN. “I’ve been hit with kendo sticks and chairs, I’ve been thrown through tables, broke my ankle, broke my nose, and have had concussions in WWE, but nothing has hurt me more than when I stubbed my toe in The Marine 3: Homefront.” 

14. A role was at stake at Wrestlemania.

Mason Norman, a former sergeant in the United States Army Reserve who appears in a non-speaking role in The Marine 3 as an FBI Agent, won the part when he auditioned at a fan contest held during WrestleMania XXVIII.

15. The Miz earned a second shot.

He will return for The Marine 4: Moving Target.

5 Film Transitions Worth Knowing

You see them every day, on TV shows, the news, and in movies, but how well do you know the most oft-used film transitions? Here are the big five:


The dissolve is an editing technique where one clip seems to fade—or dissolve—into the next. As the first clip is fading out, getting lighter and lighter, the second clip starts fading in, becoming more and more prominent. The process usually happens so subtly and so quickly, the viewer isn't even aware of the transition. The above video offers a great overview of the cut, with examples.


This transition is the opposite of the dissolve in that it draws attention to itself. The best example of the wipe is what's known as the Iris Wipe, which you usually find in silent films, like Buster Keaton's or the Merrie Melodies cartoons—the circle getting smaller and smaller. Other wipe shapes include stars, diamonds, and the old turning clock.

The Star Wars films are chock-full of attention-grabbing wipes. Here are two good examples from The Empire Strikes Back. The first shows the clock wipe; the second, the diagonal wipe (pay no attention to the broken blocks at the start of the second clip—that's a technical glitch, not part of the film).


As the name implies, in the basic cutaway, the filmmaker is moving from the action to something else, and then coming back to the action. Cutaways are used to edit out boring shots (like people driving to their destination—why not see what the character is seeing or even thinking sometimes?) or add action to a sequence by changing the pace of the footage. My favorite use of the cutaway is in Family Guy, where the technique is used to insert throwaway gags. Here's a great example:


The L Cut, also called a split edit, is a very cool technique whose name dates back to the old analog film days.

The audio track on a strip of celluloid film runs along the side, near the sprocket holes. In the L Cut transition, the editor traditionally cut the picture frames out of the strip, but left the narrow audio track intact, thus creating an L-shape out of the film. A different camera angle, or scene was then spliced into the spot where the old picture was, so the audio from the old footage was now cut over the new footage.

Of course, with digital editing, one doesn't need to physically cut anything anymore, but the transition is still widely used, and the name has remained the same.

Split edits like these are especially effective in portraying conversations. Imagine how a simple conversation between two people might look if all we ever got was a ping-pong edit back and forth between the two people talking. The L cut allows the viewer to read the emotion on the listener's face, as the dialogue continues over, as we see in this clip from Ferris Bueller's Day Off:


The fade in and fade out usually signal the beginning or end of a scene, especially if the filmmaker is fading to/from black. This is the most common, of course, but fading to white has become trendy, too. The opening title sequence from the HBO series Six Feet Under featured many fades to black and a couple brief fades to white. The very last bit in the sequence fades slowly to white, and is my all-time favorite example of the transition:

science fiction
Why So Many Aliens in Pop Culture Look Familiar

Aliens have been depicted countless times in cinema, from Georges Méliès's A Trip to the Moon (1902) to James Cameron's Avatar (2009). But despite the advancements in special-effects technology over the past century, most aliens we see on screen still share a lot of similarities—mainly, they look, move, and interact with the world like humans do. Vox explains how the classic alien look came to be in their new video below.

When you picture an alien, you may imagine a being with reptilian skin or big, black eyes, but the basic components of a human body—two arms, two legs, and a head with a face—are likely all there. In reality, finding an intelligent creature that evolved all those same features on a planet millions of light-years away would be an extraordinary coincidence. If alien life does exist, it may not look like anything we've ever seen on Earth.

But when it comes to science fiction, accuracy isn't always the goal. Creating an alien character humans can relate to may take priority. Or, the alien's design may need to work as a suit that can be worn by human performers. The result is a version of extraterrestrial life that looks alien— but not too alien—to movie audiences.

So if aliens probably won't have four limbs, two eyes, and a mouth, what would they look like if we ever met them person? These experts have some theories.

[h/t Vox]


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