8 Strange Amusement Parks From Around the World

In the six years since we wrote about some of the weirdest amusement parks on Earth, many other strange parks have opened, so it seemed fitting to do a follow-up. While these parks may not be the happiest places on earth, they just might be some of the weirdest.

1. Wunderland Kalkar, Germany

In 1973, construction started on a nuclear power plant outside of Dusseldorf, but it never went online due to construction issues and protests. The system did actually go into partial operation for about a year, but the nuclear materials did not yet arrive, and after 1986's Chernobyl disaster, the project was cancelled altogether.

When the property was sold off in 1991, one Dutch entrepreneur saw a perfect business opportunity. He purchased the property and converted it into an amusement park that features more than 40 rides—including a swing ride and climbing wall, which are both built on the iconic cooling tower.

2. Išgyvenimo Drama, Lithuania

If you've ever wondered how well you'd survive in an oppressive military prison, here's your chance to find out: Išgyvenimo Drama doesn't offer any spins or drops like your favorite rollercoaster, but it will probably give you more chills than any ride ever could—because this attraction puts you right inside a Soviet-era prison.

The bunker dates back from the USSR occupation of Lithuania, and those who choose to experience the drama are treated to a terrifying historical reenactment. Visitors to the survival experience are first forced to surrender all of their possessions and change into Soviet coats. They are then ordered to put on gas masks, learn the Soviet anthem, eat a typical Soviet meal, submit to a medical exam, and undergo a Gulag-style interrogation by employees who were previously employed in the Soviet army (many of whom were even interrogators in their positions). Those who survive are given a shot of vodka to help calm their nerves before returning to regular society again.

3. Action Park, New Jersey

It seems anyone who lived in New Jersey between 1978 and 1996 has memories (or nightmares) of the legendary Action Park, a place with a reputation that would put any imaginary horror park to shame.

Thanks to poorly-designed, shoddily-constructed rides, ambulances were a common sight at the park. In fact, Vernon Township, where Action Park was located, had to buy more ambulances (nicknamed the "Action Park Express") solely to keep up with the park's injuries (including six fatalities). The park was so infamous that it inspired its own short documentary.

Perhaps the most amazing thing about Action Park, though, is that the company that owned it and helped earn the park such a fearsome reputation recently repurchased the park and re-opened it under the same name this summer.

4. Beijing Shijingshan Amusement Park, China

Wikipedia user Dyliu714

In what could easily be called the Copyright Infringing-est Place on Earth, visitors are invited to enjoy a suspiciously familiar-looking castle and to take photos with characters that strongly resemble Mickey Mouse, Shrek, Hello Kitty, Bugs Bunny, Donald Duck, Betty Boop, Winnie the Pooh, and other famous trademarked characters, which the park owners claim are all based on Grimm's Fairy Tales. If that all strikes you as mere coincidence and not serious copyright infringement, consider the park's old slogan: "Disney is too far to go, please come to Shijingshan!"

Unsurprisingly, park owners have been sued multiple times, but the park remains open although they do seem to periodically discontinue using particular icons—for example, some of the Disney-inspired statues were torn down over the last few years and costumed characters seem to have largely disappeared from the park. Asia Obscura has a great, photo-filled article from a 2011 trip to the park after many of the changes took place—copyright infringement is still pretty evident, though, as is the odd mishmash of cultural icons.

5. World Joyland, China

Flickr user Jeremy Thompson

For those who prefer copyright infringement involving video games, Changzou's World Joyland offers all the real world fun you'd expect of a World of Warcraft or Starcraft, without all those pesky licenses. It also happens to be one of China's most popular theme parks—particularly among cosplayers who enjoy showing off their creations to visitors.

Enjoy the fantastical Terrain of Magic or the high tech Universe of Starship, or get a bite to eat at a noodle house that just happens to have a mascot of a jovial, cartoon panda practicing kung fu.

6. Love Land, South Korea

Wikipedia user gdimension

South Korea's Jeju Island has been a popular destination for newlyweds ever since the Korean War. Many of the couples were joined together in arranged marriages and the partners never received sex education. In 2004, Love Land opened on the island as a sort of sex-ed park that features statues, films and interactive exhibits based around sexual activities. It takes about one hour to go through the whole attraction, which is only open to those 18 and over.

7. Ferrari World, UAE

Flickr user Aziz J. Hayat

If you want to make a splash in the UAE, the rule is "go big or go away." Ferrari World is no exception: The attraction is not only home to Formula Rossa, the world's fastest roller coaster, as well as the world's largest Ferrari logo—but the park itself is the world's largest indoor amusement park, covering over 2 million square feet.

As you may guess, the rides and attractions tend to be Ferrari-themed, but even those who aren't car crazy will still likely enjoy themselves on the flume rides, roller coasters and other traditional amusement park attractions.

8. Parque Jaime Duque, Colombia

Flickr user Rosalba Tarazona

What do you look for in an amusement park? If your answer is "naked, gender-swapped versions of famous statues," then you need to head down to Colombia's Parque Jaime Duque, where you can enjoy a massive, nude, male version of the Statue of Liberty—and that's only one of the park's 700 strange sculptures. The park also offers a miniaturized version of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and "Dante's Castle," a magical boat ride based on Dante's Inferno.

Warner Bros.
Pop Culture
Jack Torrance's Corduroy Jacket from The Shining Can Be Yours (If You've Got $12,000 to Spare)
Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy … but at least he's stylish. In a 60-year career full of memorable performances, Jack Nicholson's role in The Shining as Jack Torrance—the husband, father, and blocked writer who convinces his family to move to an empty ski resort for the winter so that he can finally finish writing the great American novel, then slowly descends into madness—remains one of his most iconic, and terrifying, characters. Now, via Italian auction house Aste Bolaffi, director Stanley Kubrick's former assistant and longtime friend Emilio D'Alessandro is giving fans of the brilliantly nuanced psychological drama the chance to own a piece of the movie's history, including the burgundy corduroy jacket that Nicholson wore throughout the movie.

According to the item's listing, the jacket was chosen by Oscar-winning costume designer Milena Canonero "after Jack Nicholson insisted it should be worn by his character, Jack Torrance, and a small number of it were made for the shooting of the film." It's a perfect accessory for a variety of activities, including shooting the breeze with a cocktail-serving ghost or chasing your family through a hedge maze in the middle of a snowstorm. Just be ready to pay a pretty penny for it: the bidding starts at €10,000, or just north of $12,000.

The jacket is one of many pieces of original Kubrick memorabilia going up for sale: props from A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, Eyes Wide Shut, and Full Metal Jacket are among the other items up for grabs (for the right price), as is a rare cut of The Shining featuring a never-released scene. "These cuts, given by Kubrick to D'Alessandro, are particularly rare because the director notoriously burned all the leftovers at the conclusion of the editing," according to the listing.

You can browse the entire auction catalog, here.

[h/t IndieWire]

5 Things We Know About Deadpool 2

After Deadpool pocketed more than $750 million worldwide in its theatrical run, a sequel was put on the fast track by Fox to capitalize on the original's momentum. It's a much different position to be in for a would-be franchise that was stuck in development hell for a decade, and with Deadpool 2's May 18, 2018 release date looming, the slow trickle of information is going to start picking up speed—beginning with the trailer, which just dropped. Though most of the movie is still under wraps, here's what we know so far about the next Deadpool.


The tendency with comic book movie sequels is to keep cramming more characters in until the main hero becomes a supporting role. While Deadpool 2 is set to expand the cast from the first film with the addition of Domino (Zazie Beetz), the return of Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead, and the formation of X-Force, writer Rhett Reese is adamant about still making sure it's a Deadpool movie.

"Yeah, it’ll be a solo movie," Reese told Deadline. "It’ll be populated with a lot of characters, but it is still Deadpool’s movie, this next one."


Fans have been waiting for Cable to come to theaters ever since the first X-Men movie debuted in 2000, but up until now, the silver-haired time traveler has been a forgotten man. Thankfully, that will change with Deadpool 2, and he'll be played by Josh Brolin, who is also making another superhero movie appearance in 2018 as the villain Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War. In the comics, Cable and Deadpool are frequent partners—they even had their own team-up series a few years back—and that dynamic will play out in the sequel. The characters are so intertwined, there were talks of possibly having him in the original.

"It’s a world that’s so rich and we always thought Cable should be in the sequel," Reese told Deadline. "There was always debate whether to put him in the original, and it felt like we needed to set up Deadpool and create his world first, and then bring those characters into his world in the next one."

Cable is actually the son of X-Men member Cyclops and a clone of Jean Grey named Madelyne Pryor (that's probably the least confusing thing about him, to be honest). While the movie might not deal with all that history, expect Cable to still play a big role in the story.


Although Deadpool grossed more than $750 million worldwide and was a critical success, it still wasn't enough to keep original director Tim Miller around for the sequel. Miller recently came out and said he left over concerns that the sequel would become too expensive and stylized. Instead, Deadpool 2 will be helmed by John Wick (2014) director David Leitch. Despite the creative shuffling, the sequel will still feature star Ryan Reynolds and writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick.

“He’s just a guy who’s so muscular with his action," Reynolds told Entertainment Weekly of Leitch's hiring. "One of the things that David Leitch does that very few filmmakers can do these days is they can make a movie on an ultra tight minimal budget look like it was shot for 10 to 15 times what it cost,"


No, this won't be the title of the movie when it hits theaters, but the working title for Deadpool 2 while it was in production was, appropriately, Love Machine.


The natural instinct for any studio is to make the sequel to a hit film even bigger. More money for special effects, more action scenes, more everything. That's not the direction Deadpool 2 is likely heading in, though, despite Miller's fears. As producer Simon Kinberg explained, it's about keeping the unique tone and feel of the original intact.

"That’s the biggest mandate going into on the second film: to not make it bigger," Kinberg told Entertainment Weekly. "We have to resist the temptation to make it bigger in scale and scope, which is normally what you do when you have a surprise hit movie."


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