This Poster Showcases Some of Rock 'N' Roll History's Most Iconic Moments

Courtesy of Dorothy
Courtesy of Dorothy

The world of rock 'n' roll has produced larger-than-life personalities and some of the most indelible moments of pop culture. From legendary groups like Queen and the Beatles to solo acts like Prince and Chuck Berry, rock artists have had cultural impact far beyond album releases—and the UK-based design shop Dorothy Studios has attempted to illustrate as many of these moments as possible.

To encapsulate the many on- and offstage moments that have helped shape rock history, Dorothy designers created "Inside Information: Vox AC30," a cutaway-style print that showcases famous people and events within the confines of a Vox AC30 guitar amp—a classic amplifier that soon became an industry standard. If you look closely, you can see everything from the Rolling Stones performing at the outdoor Stones in the Park music festival in July 1969 to Johnny Cash's live album performance at the Folsom State Prison in January 1968.

music poster
Courtesy of Dorothy

The poster print also has a helpful key that explains who, and what, each of the 40 separate illustrations showcase. In a way, the piece also serves as a handy beginner's guide for music fans looking to explore the depth of rock 'n' roll lore.

James Quail, creative director and partner at Dorothy, acted as the designer of the piece (as well as on this alternative music history poster) and explains that inspiration came from his love for diagrams. "The idea for the series came from thinking about memories of scientific cutaways from when I was in high school," Quail tells Mental Floss. "I loved diagrams which showed how machinery worked, or cut the Earth into portions and showing what was happening inside."

Quail also designed all of Dorothy's other pieces in their "Inside Information" collection. After Quail researches the genres being spotlighted and chooses the events he wants to feature, he works with Liverpudlian graphic designer Malik Thomas, who illustrates the print.

music poster
Courtesy of Dorothy

"We had the idea of taking real things apart but introducing levels of fantasy inside, so musical instruments might be filled with the artists and bands who used them, or film cameras filled with all the iconic moments from film that we could think of, and scenes playing out from a different perspective than we were used to seeing them," Quail says.

While the poster is chock-full of references, Quail admits there were still plenty of events they didn't have room for.

"Rock history is so rich with incident and anecdotes that to cover them all we would need a whole wall, but we picked a snapshot, hopefully covering off things that represent most eras, be it era-defining moments like the Beatles playing on The Ed Sullivan Show or the Sex Pistols playing Manchester's Lesser Free Trade Hall," Quail says. "Or moments that meant something big to us personally—like the first time I saw Nirvana playing 'Smells Like Teen Spirit.'"

music poster
Courtesy of Dorothy

This print, "Inside Information: Vox AC30," is available from Dorothy Studios for roughly $38. Other pieces in this collection including the movie-inspired "Director’s Cut," the portable music synthesizer "Minimoog," or the "Apple Macintosh," which chronicles the history of, well, Apple.

This Cool T-Shirt Shows Every Object Brought on the Apollo 11 Mission

Fringe Focus
Fringe Focus

NASA launched the Apollo 11 mission on July 16, 1969, ending the space race and beginning a new era of international space exploration. Just in time for the mission's 50th anniversary this year, Fringe Focus is selling a t-shirt that displays every item the Apollo 11 astronauts brought with them to the Moon.

The design, by artist Rob Loukotka, features some of the iconic objects from the mission, such as a space suit and helmet, as well as the cargo that never made it to primetime. Detailed illustrations of freeze-dried meals, toiletries, and maintenance kits are included on the shirt. The artist looked at 200 objects and chose to represent some similar items with one drawing, ending up with 69 pictures in total.

The unisex shirt is made from lightweight cotton, and comes in seven sizes ranging from small to 4XL. It's available in black heather or heather midnight navy for $29.

If you really like the design, the artwork is available in other forms. The same illustration has also been made into poster with captions indicating which pictures represent multiple items of a similar nature.

The Reason Sneakers Have an Extra Set of Holes

iStock/PredragImages
iStock/PredragImages

If you examine your favorite items of clothing closely enough, you may start to ask questions like: Why are shirt buttons on different sides for men and women? (Because, historically, women didn't dress themselves.) Or why do my jeans have a tiny pocket? (To hold your pocket watch, of course.) Both of the clothing quirks mentioned above are relics of a different time, but if you look at your sneakers, you'll find a commonly-ignored detail that can be useful to your daily life.

Most sneakers have an extra set of holes above the laces that are often left empty. The holes may not line up exactly with the rest of the laces, indicating that they're there to serve a special purpose. For many situations, ignoring this pair of holes is totally fine, but if you're tying up your shoes before a rigorous run or hike, you should take advantage of them.

The video below from the company Illumiseen illustrates how to create a heel lock with these extra holes. Start by taking one lace and poking it through the hole directly above it to create a loop, and then do the same with the lace on the other side. Next, take the ends of both laces and pull them through the opposite loops. Tighten the laces by pulling them downwards rather than up. After creating the heel lock, secure it with a regular bow tie.

What this method does is tighten the opening of your shoe around your ankle, thus preventing your heel from sliding against the back of it as you run. It also stops your toe from banging against the front of your shoe. The heel lock is especially handy for long runs, walks, and other activities that often end with heel blisters and bruised toes. Even if you aren't slipping on your shoes for exercise, lacing up those extra holes can make a loose-fitting sneaker feel more comfortable.

Of course, the trick only works as long as your laces stayed tied—which even the most expertly-tied knot can't guarantee. Here's some of the science behind why your shoes often untie themselves.

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