Disney
Disney

10 Disney Sidekicks That Got the Axe

Disney
Disney

Though the heroes, heroines, princes, and princesses tend to run the show over at Disney, many of your favorite animated characters would be nothing without their sidekicks. Without the dwarfs, Snow White never would have made it out of the woods. Aladdin would have perished in the Cave of Wonders with no Carpet and no Genie. And Belle would have likely starved to death if household items hadn’t started singing to her.

Choosing a sidekick is tricky business, though—there are a number of reasons why a sidekick could end up on the cutting room floor instead of helping to save the day. Here are 10 that didn't quite make the cut.

1. Red Feather, a wild turkey from Pocahontas

John Candy was slated to voice this woodland fowl; it’s rumored that he even recorded some lines. The artists working on the movie were having trouble matching the serious nature of the film with the silly talking turkey, though, and in the midst of figuring it out, Candy passed away. The decision was made to make all of the sidekick characters non-speaking. Somewhere in this process, Red Feather was scrapped for Meeko the raccoon and Flit the hummingbird.

This is what Red Feather would have looked like:

2. Mheetu, Nala’s little brother in The Lion King

An alternative draft of The Lion King showed a lot more of the happenings in the Pride Lands while Simba was out Hakuna Matataing with Timon and Pumbaa. During this time, Nala would be shown protecting her little brother, Mheetu, from the evil Scar. Mheetu, along with another sidekick named Bhati the bat-eared fox, were eventually scrapped.

3. Music Box, Beauty and the Beast

Before Chip Cup stole the show, a little music box was supposed to be the infantilized household object that made you go, “Awwww.” When voice actor Michael Bradley Pierce ended up stealing the show as Chip, however, the music box part was scaled way back and Pierce’s role was increased. The music box can still be spotted in a few scenes, probably hoping Chip Cup will take a tumble off of the table.

4. Senorita Cactus in Toy Story 2

This one may be hard to believe, but at one point, instead of Jessie the Cowgirl, the female lead in Toy Story 2 was “Senorita Cactus.” The prickly plant was apparently supposed to sway Woody into joining the Woody’s Round-Up gang by using her feminine wiles. That could have turned out very badly for ol’ Woody.

5. Breaker the Dolphin in The Little Mermaid

Although a dolphin pal probably would have been way more useful for Ariel, her original dolphin sidekick named Breaker was eventually replaced by the sweet-but-slow Flounder. Breaker wasn’t trashed entirely, though—some of his enthusiastic personality traits were transplanted into Ariel.

6. Four more fairies in Sleeping Beauty

Just like Perrault’s original fairy tale, early versions of Sleeping Beauty included seven good fairies instead of the three you see in the film. Perhaps worried about comparisons to Snow White and her seven buddies, or maybe just aware that seven fairies would take up a lot of space and screen time, the concept was eventually pared down to three core fairies.

7. A regent in Frozen

OK, this one is not a sidekick, exactly, but it’s still fun to imagine what might have been. Ever wonder exactly how Arendelle was being run in the years between the death of the King and Queen and Elsa’s coronation? Scriptwriters had that covered, at one point—it was a regent to be voiced by Louis C.K. “I wanted him so badly in the film. I just wanted him in the film,” co-director Jennifer Lee said. “But the first act is so heavy, it’s still heavy. There’s so much in it.” To make the first part of the movie move a little faster, the role was cut.

8. Rocky the Rhino in The Jungle Book

Described as “a Mr. Magoo of a rhinoceros,” Rocky the Rhino was supposed to be a dim-witted, bumbling, near-blind character. His scenes were completely storyboarded before Walt gave him the boot, deciding that there were too many action sequences in a row.

You see Rocky’s big scene below, as well as a Beatles-inspired version of “That’s What Friends are For,” the song the vultures sing.

9. Hubert the dog in Lady and the Tramp

Instead of reliable neighbor dogs Jock and Trusty, Lady was originally supposed to have just one friend in the neighborhood: a mutt named Hubert who would have a Ralph Bellamy-like personality.

10. A Laurel and Hardy-like chipmunk and squirrel in Bambi

Though Walt liked the “screwball attitude” of the characters, the pair didn't make the final film, presumably because their antics just didn’t match the tone of the movie. Some of the original gags storyboarded by Carl Barks and Chuck Couch still survive.

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Ernest Hemingway’s Guide to Life, In 20 Quotes
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Though he made his living as a writer, Ernest Hemingway was just as famous for his lust for adventure. Whether he was running with the bulls in Pamplona, fishing for marlin in Bimini, throwing back rum cocktails in Havana, or hanging out with his six-toed cats in Key West, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning author never did anything halfway. And he used his adventures as fodder for the unparalleled collection of novels, short stories, and nonfiction books he left behind, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, Death in the Afternoon, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea among them.

On what would be his 119th birthday—he was born in Oak Park, Illinois on July 21, 1899—here are 20 memorable quotes that offer a keen perspective into Hemingway’s way of life.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF LISTENING

"I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen."

ON TRUST

"The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them."

ON DECIDING WHAT TO WRITE ABOUT

"I never had to choose a subject—my subject rather chose me."

ON TRAVEL

"Never go on trips with anyone you do not love."


Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. [1], Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS

"Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

ON TRUTH

"There's no one thing that is true. They're all true."

ON THE DOWNSIDE OF PEOPLE

"The only thing that could spoil a day was people. People were always the limiters of happiness, except for the very few that were as good as spring itself."

ON SUFFERING FOR YOUR ART

"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed."

ON TAKING ACTION

"Never mistake motion for action."

ON GETTING WORDS OUT

"I wake up in the morning and my mind starts making sentences, and I have to get rid of them fast—talk them or write them down."


Photograph by Mary Hemingway, in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston., Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE BENEFITS OF SLEEP

"I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know?"

ON FINDING STRENGTH 

"The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places."

ON THE TRUE NATURE OF WICKEDNESS

"All things truly wicked start from innocence."

ON WRITING WHAT YOU KNOW

"If a writer knows enough about what he is writing about, he may omit things that he knows. The dignity of movement of an iceberg is due to only one ninth of it being above water."

ON THE DEFINITION OF COURAGE

"Courage is grace under pressure."

ON THE PAINFULNESS OF BEING FUNNY

"A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book."


By Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. - JFK Library, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON KEEPING PROMISES

"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."

ON GOOD VS. EVIL

"About morals, I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after."

ON REACHING FOR THE UNATTAINABLE

"For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed."

ON HAPPY ENDINGS

"There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it."

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