The Game of Thrones Finale Could Kill Workplace Productivity on Monday

Emilia Clarke stars as Daenerys Targaryen in a scene from Game of Thrones's series finale
Emilia Clarke stars as Daenerys Targaryen in a scene from Game of Thrones's series finale
HBO

The series finale of Game of Thrones is upon us, and employers across the U.S. should be very afraid. “Absence is Coming,” a new survey from The Workforce Institute at Kronos, conducted by The Harris Poll, found that the final episode premiering this Sunday, May 19, is likely to cause major Monday workplace conflicts.

According to the survey—which analyzed the results of 1090 working adults who took part in an online poll alongside U.S. Census Data and extrapolated its final tallies from there—the conclusion of Game of Thrones could be as disastrous to America's workplaces on Monday morning as it will likely be to some of your favorite characters. According to the poll:

“Approximately 27.2 million employees who plan to watch the Game of Thrones finale live admit they will either miss work completely, arrive late, work remotely, be less productive than usual, or experience another impact on work obligations Monday because of the series finale of the most popular show in HBO history.”

While that viewership estimate is likely high (season 8's penultimate episode, "The Bells," is the series's most-watched so far, with 18.4 million viewers), there's no denying that Game of Thrones's finale will rival some of the most-watched series finales of all time. 

Based on the survey's predictions, approximately 10.7 million Americans are already planning to take the day off from work completely while 2.9 million are planning to show up late. Apparently, this is not a new development: The Workforce Institute at Kronos reports that Game of Thrones season 8 has already had a negative impact on workplace productivity. They estimate that 4.4 million employees have already "missed work specifically to stream reruns to refresh their memory on key plotlines or catch up on missed episodes."

Not all of the questions asked were super serious, though. When asked about which Game of Thrones character they'd most like to have as a manager, one in four respondents said Jon Snow (earning the true heir to the Iron Throne the top spot), with Tyrion Lannister coming in second followed by Daenerys Targaryen (perhaps unsurprisingly, the survey was conducted online between May 7 and May 9—before "The Bells" happened). Amazingly, even Cersei Lannister got 2 percent of the vote.

If “Absence is Coming” proves anything, it’s that employers might make out better if they just declared Monday a national day of mourning and gave everyone the day off.

The 8 Best Horror Movies to Stream on Hulu Right Now

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

Looking for a good scare this Halloween season? If you’re a Hulu subscriber, you’ll be able to get your fill of creepy content. Check out eight of the best horror movies currently streaming on the service.

1. Hellraiser (1987)

Horror author Clive Barker made the move to feature directing with this tale of a man (Sean Chapman) who makes the grievous error of opening a portal to hell and proceeds to make his brother’s family targets of the sadistic Cenobites, led by Pinhead (Doug Bradley). Don’t bother with the endless sequels; the original is the best (and goriest) of the lot.

2. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

Paranoia runs deep in this remake of the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). In the ‘70s iteration, Donald Sutherland plays a health inspector who can’t shake the feeling that people around him seem a little off. He soon grows wise to the reality that aliens are walking among us as virtual human replicas. Naturally, they’re not keen on being discovered.

3. A Quiet Place (2018)

John Krasinski and Emily Blunt star as a couple living in a world terrorized by creatures that hunt by sound. Their largely-silent existence means every stray creak, cry, or noise threatens to expose them to the monsters—a danger that's only compounded when Blunt discovers she’s pregnant.

4. The Orphanage (2007)

A sense of dread looms over The Orphanage, a Spanish-language thriller with Belén Rueda as Laura, who returns to the child care facility that raised her so she can make a difference for a new generation of children. Strange things begin as soon as she arrives, with her son going missing and hints of unwelcome guests unraveling her nerves. It’s a film best not watched alone.

5. Event Horizon (1997)

If 1979’s Alien stirred your interest in space scares, Event Horizon might make for a worthwhile watch. After a spaceship presumed lost suddenly reappears, a crew of investigators (Sam Neill, Laurence Fishburne) board to find answers.

6. Children of the Corn (1984)

A couple (Peter Horton, Linda Hamilton) passing through a small rural town find a lack of adult supervision curious—until the kids reveal themselves to be homicidal cult members. Based on a Stephen King short story.

7. Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987)

Bruce Campbell and Sam Raimi perfected “splatstick” horror in this cult classic about hapless boob Ash (Campbell) who escapes to a remote cabin retreat with girlfriend Linda (Denise Bixler) and unwittingly unleashes a cascade of evil. Though it’s more amusing than scary, Raimi’s inventive imagery is morbidly fascinating.

8. Child’s Play (1988)

Good mom Catherine Hicks buys a Good Guys doll for her son, Andy. Unfortunately, the doll—dubbed Chucky—has been possessed by the spirit of a serial killer (Brad Dourif) and proceeds to make young Andy’s life miserable, particularly after he discovers the kitchen cutlery.

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