This Is What Millions of Monarch Butterflies Sound Like

iStock/JHVEPhoto
iStock/JHVEPhoto

Monarch butterflies have disappeared from some parts of the U.S., but there are plenty of the winged creatures at Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. In a video spotted by The Kids Should See This, entomologist and conservationist Phil Torres pays a visit to the UNESCO-protected butterfly sanctuary in Michoacán, which is located northwest of Mexico City.

Beginning each fall, millions of the butterflies—which could soon be labeled an endangered species, depending on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s forthcoming decision—migrate from the U.S. and Canada to the forests of Michoacán. Once there, they completely cover the pine and oyamel trees they land on, creating fluttering branches that look like a strange species of tree at first glance.

“It’s not just visually stunning. It’s not just emotionally stunning … It sounds absolutely magic[al],” Torres says, “because you’ve never heard before the sounds of tens of millions of butterflies flying around you, because it only happens here. It’s one of the rarest sounds on Earth and you’re about to get a listen.”

At around the 5:40 mark in the video, you can hear the low buzzing sound of the butterflies—a surprisingly soothing ambient noise that’s best heard through headphones. Check out Torres’s video below, and visit his YouTube channel, The Jungle Diaries, to see more nature videos like these.

[h/t The Kids Should See This]

A Custom Wheelchair Allowed This Brain-Injured Baby Raccoon to Walk Again

фотограф/iStock via Getty Images
фотограф/iStock via Getty Images

Animal prosthetics and wheelchairs allow dogs, cats, and even zoo animals with limited mobility to walk again, but wild animals with disabilities aren't usually as lucky. Vittles, a baby raccoon rescued in Arkansas, is the rare example of an animal that was severely injured in its natural habitat getting a second shot at life.

As Tribune Media Wire reports, Vittles came to wildlife rehab specialist Susan Curtis, who works closely with raccoons for the state of Arkansas, with a traumatic brain injury at just 8 weeks old. The cause of the trauma wasn't clear, but it was obvious that the raccoon wouldn't be able to survive on her own if returned to the wild.

Curtis partnered with the pet mobility gear company Walkin' Pets to get Vittles back on her feet. They built her a tiny custom wheelchair to give her balance and support as she learned to get around on her own. The video below shows Vittles using her legs and navigating spaces with help from the chair and guidance from her caretaker.

Vittles will likely never recover fully, but now that she's able to exercise her leg muscles, her chance at one day moving around independently is greater than it would have been otherwise. She now lives with her caretaker Susan and a 10-year old raccoon with cerebral palsy named Beetlejuice. After she's rehabilitated, the plan is to one day make her part of Arkansas's educational wildlife program.

[h/t Tribune Media Wire]

A Close-Up View of a Mosquito's Terrifying 6-Needle Bite

Backiris/iStock via Getty Images
Backiris/iStock via Getty Images

Summer is nearing its end, so here’s a close-up view of the nightmare that has come for you at every barbecue, outdoor movie night, and sweaty porch get-together. Mosquitoes, those deadly, pesky bloodsuckers, are even more terrifying up close, as this 4K video from San Francisco–based PBS station KQED shows.

A mosquito bite isn’t a bite like anything you’d imagine: There are six different needle-like stylets that pierce the skin, including two bearing tiny, super-sharp teeth that saw through skin. Watch the process below.

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