25 Irish Slang Terms You Should Know

iStock.com/levers2007
iStock.com/levers2007

People in Ireland speak English, but not exactly the "Queen’s English." With a little help from the Gaelic language—called Irish—the populace of the Emerald Isle have devised their very own myriad of weird and wonderful words and phrases. Here are a few Irish colloquialisms to help you understand the next person from Derry, Dublin, or Donegal that you come in contact with:

  1. Craic (pronounced "crack"): This is the big one. Originally crack as used by Ulster Scots, the Gaelic spelling of the word was not widely used in Ireland until it was popularized as the catchphrase of the Irish-language TV show SBB ina Shuí starting in the 1970s. Now, craic is probably the word most commonly used by Irish people across the world. The word has a pretty simple meaning, however—"general banter" or "fun."
  1. Wee: Small. Everything in Ireland is wee. Absolutely everything. If Big Shaq was Irish, he’d have been called "Wee Shaq."
  1. Wean (pronounced "wayne"): A child.
  1. Lethal/leefs: Mainly used in the northwest of Ireland, these words both mean "great"; leefs is short for "lethal."
  1. Quare (pronounced "kware"): An odd-looking word that also means "great," or "very."
  1. Feck off: Quite possibly Ireland’s greatest achievement, this phrase is the perfect way to curse without technically cursing. Replace the e with a u, and you have what this slang term means.
  1. Dooter: A wee (see above) walk.
  1. Saunter: A slightly brisker walk. Almost a strut, but with less shoulder movement and self-confidence.
  1. Aye/Naw: Yes/no.
  1. Yes: Hello (this one doesn’t make sense—we know that).
  1. Lashing: Raining heavily.
  1. Slag: Used as a verb, it means to make a joke at someone else’s expense.
  1. Wired to the moon: You know that feeling you get when you’ve enjoyed a fairly big Tuesday night in a club, and then stumble into work the next morning after downing six espresso shots at the nearest Starbucks? Yes, that is what being "wired to the moon" is.
  1. Jesus, Mary & Joseph: When it comes to blasphemy, there are no half measures in Ireland. As a historically religious country, blasphemy is relatively frowned upon, so when an Irish person it absolutely necessary to take the Lord’s name in vain, they do so by taking Jesus’s whole family in vain.
  1. Cat: Bad … because apparently Irish people think cats are bad?
  1. Brock: Also bad.
  1. Eejit: A person who is a bit of an idiot.
  1. While man/woman: A person who is also a bit of an idiot.
  1. Melter: And yet another person who is a bit of an idiot, or at least very annoying.
  1. Haven’t a baldies: When you are unsure of an answer to a question.
  1. Wind your neck in: The perfect way to take someone who is overly arrogant down a peg or two? Tell them to "wind their neck in."
  1. Yonks: A long time.
  1. Bake: Face.
  1. Juke: A wee (see way above) look.
  1. All lured: Delighted.

11 Versions of “Average Joe” From Other Countries

santypan/iStock via Getty Images
santypan/iStock via Getty Images

Average Joe, Joe Schmo, John Doe. He’s bland and average. Faceless, but not nameless. Every country needs a way to talk about just “some guy.” Here’s what 11 countries call that typical guy, who might have no specific qualities, but is still “one of our own.”

1. Germany: Otto Normalverbraucher

Literally, Otto “normal consumer."

2. China: Zhang San, Li Si

This translates to “Three Zhang, Four Li”—a reference to some of the most popular Chinese surnames.

3. Denmark: Morten Menigmand

"Morton Everyman."

4. Australia: Fred Nurk

Sounds pretty normal to me.

5. Russia: Vasya Pupkin

With a name like that, it’s hard not to be a typical schmo.

6. Finland: Matti Meikäläinen

Meikäläinen looks like a typical Finnish surname, but it also means “one of us.”

7. Sweden: Medelsvensson

Just your average Svensson.

8. France: Monsieur Tout-Le-Monde

“Mr. Everyone.” Also goes by Jean Dupont.

9. UK/New Zealand: Joe Bloggs

Still an average Joe (but can also be a Fred).

10. Italy: Mario Rossi

In Italy they just use a common name.

11. Latin America: Juan Pérez

The same is true in various Spanish-speaking countries in Central and South America.

A version of this list first ran in 2014.

When Are the Dog Days of Summer?

Dorottya_Mathe/iStock via Getty Images
Dorottya_Mathe/iStock via Getty Images

The official “dog days” of summer begin on July 3 and end on August 11. So how did this time frame earn its canine nickname? It turns out the phrase has nothing to do with the poor pooches who are forever seeking shade in the July heat, and everything to do with the nighttime sky.

Sirius, the Dog Star, is the brightest star in the sky. The ancient Greeks noticed that in the summer months, Sirius rose and set with the Sun, and they theorized that it was the bright, glowing Dog Star that was adding extra heat to the Earth in July and August.

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