10 Facts About Crohn’s Disease

iStock.com/Carlo107
iStock.com/Carlo107

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease in which the immune system attacks the lining of the intestine, usually the ending of the small intestine (called the ileum) or the colon. But it's more than just a case of irritable bowels. Crohn's disease symptoms range from abdominal cramps to ulcers that eat through the intestinal wall, and the complications—including pain, diarrhea, and malnutrition—can be sometimes be fatal. But with a proper diagnosis and the right medical care, managing the condition is possible for patients with Crohn’s. Here are more facts about Crohn's disease, from testing to treatments.

1. Crohn's disease causes are unknown, but genetics may be involved.

The exact causes of Crohn’s disease haven’t been identified, but for many people, family history plays a role. About 15 percent of Crohn’s patients share the diagnosis with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or child). Whether the family cluster patterns have more to do with genetics or environment is still unclear, though environmental factors appear to have more of an impact on the development of Crohn's disease symptoms. Scientists have also identified more than 200 gene variants that could influence Crohn's disease risk, mostly affecting genes related to immune system function.

2. Crohn's disease symptoms can come and go.

Crohn’s disease is characterized by inflammation of the digestive tract, and common signs include abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, diarrhea, fatigue, and fever. In severe cases, the inflammation can cause ulcers in the intestinal wall that prevents nutrient absorption, which can lead to weight loss and malnutrition. The intensity of these symptoms can be unpredictable. Flare-ups of gastrointestinal distress can last weeks to months, and there can also be long stretches of time when patients live symptom-free. Anti-inflammatory treatments can encourage the symptoms to go into remission, but the disease can never be cured completely.

3. Your diet can make Crohn's disease symptoms worse.

Doctors used to think of diet as one of the main causes of Crohn’s disease, but now it’s just thought to be a factor that exacerbates the symptoms. Certain foods can aggravate the digestive systems of people with Crohn’s. High-fiber foods, such fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, are some of the worst culprits, though cooked fruits and vegetables are generally gentler on the GI tract than raw ones.

4. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are not the same.

People commonly confuse ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The two conditions are both inflammatory bowel diseases (which are different than irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, which involves intestinal muscle contractions rather than inflammation). Both UC and Crohn's disease share symptoms such as weight loss, rectal bleeding, and diarrhea. But they differ in important ways: UC is limited to the large intestine, while Crohn’s disease can develop anywhere on the gastrointestinal tract between the mouth and anus. UC inflammation is also concentrated on the innermost intestinal lining, whereas can Crohn’s can penetrate the entire bowel wall. If you suspect you have an IBD, a doctor can help you identify the exact condition.

5. Crohn's disease can also affect the joints, eyes, and skin.

Crohn’s disease is known as a gastrointestinal disease, but the symptoms can extend beyond the digestive tract. People experiencing inflammation in the colon can also have inflammation in the joints. Up to 25 percent of patients with Crohn’s or UC also suffer from arthritis. Other complications include inflammation of the skin and eyes. Because eye tissue is so sensitive, ocular symptoms like redness and itchiness often appear before the first gastrointestinal signs.

6. A fecal occult blood test is one way to diagnose Crohn's disease.

There’s no one test for Crohn’s disease. Instead, doctors diagnose the condition by performing a series of tests to rule out other possible ailments. Testing poop samples with a fecal occult blood test can reveal hidden (or occult) blood in a patient’s stool, and testing antibodies can indicate whether symptoms are caused by Crohn’s or UC. Imaging tests—such as an ultrasound, MRI, X-ray, CT scan, or colonoscopy—gives doctors visual clues to the extent of a patient’s condition.

7. Incidence of Crohn's disease is increasing.

Crohn’s affects people of all ages, but symptoms usually appear in younger patients: People in the 15-to-35 age group are most likely to be diagnosed with the condition. Childhood cases of Crohn’s disease can lead to complications like delayed growth. Some studies have shown that the disease is becoming more prevalent, especially in Western countries and in children. Researchers think the "Westernized lifestyle" of poor-quality diet and lack of exercise are contributing factors to the increase.

8. Crohn's disease complications can be deadly.

If left untreated, Crohn’s disease can lead to some life-threatening complications. Inflammation can permanently damage the intestines, scarring parts the GI tract and causing tissue to thicken. In some cases, the damage is so severe that the bowel becomes blocked and surgery is required to remove the obstruction. Another possible complication is a fistula: an ulcer that has penetrated the intestinal wall and connected into a different part of the body, such as another organ or skin. An infected fistula is potentially fatal if ignored. Crohn's disease also increases a patient's risk of developing colorectal cancer. Inflammatory bowel disease is the third highest risk factor for colorectal cancer cases, though IBD-related cancer incidence is decreasing in some countries.

9. Surgery is a last resort for Crohn's disease.

Though Crohn’s disease can’t be cured, it can be managed. Most patients are initially put on anti-inflammatory medications. Other drugs, like pain relievers, nutritional supplements, and anti-diarrheal medications, are prescribed to treat the symptoms of the disease. If the condition doesn't improve, patients may require surgery to remove damaged portions of the bowel, close fistulas, and drain abscesses. Doctors may also recommend specific dietary changes to avoid flare-ups.

10. Crohn's disease was identified in the 1930s.

In 1932, gastroenterologist Burrill B. Crohn and his colleagues Leon Ginzburg and Gordon D. Oppenheimer identified the condition now known as Crohn’s disease, which Crohn called ileitis (meaning inflammation of the ileum). Prior to the report, the condition was thought to be type of a tuberculosis and not an inflammatory bowel disease. In addition to helping define the disease that bears his name, Crohn was one of the first medical professionals to link gastrointestinal distress to anxiety. He also published a book with the charming title Affections of the Stomach in 1927 and commented in media reports when President Dwight D. Eisenhower came down with ileitis symptoms in 1956.

All 73 Game of Thrones Episodes Ranked, According to IMDb Users

Kit Harington in "The Battle of the Bastards" episode of Game of Thrones
Kit Harington in "The Battle of the Bastards" episode of Game of Thrones
HBO

Next time you're in the middle of a large gathering of Game of Thrones fans, try this little experiment: Ask them to rattle of their five favorite episodes of the series, in order of preference. While you'll likely hear some of the same titles—"The Rains of Castamere" and "Battle of the Bastards" are practically givens—the order in which each person's favorite episodes rank will surely vary, as entertainment is a subjective thing.

Though it may be impossible to create a definitive ranking of the best Game of Thrones episodes, you can find a general consensus—just like IMDb has. And according to the online movie database's users, "The Rains of Castamere" (a.k.a. The Red Wedding episode), "Hardhome," "Battle of the Bastards," and "The Winds of Winter" each score a near-perfect 9.9 out of 10.

At the bottom of the list for these same users? "The Iron Throne," the series finale that has audiences divided and only managed to score a 4.6 rating on the site so far (though that's according to more than 100,000 people—and growing).

Where does your favorite episode rank? Check out IMDb's ranking of all 73 episodes of the series below to find out.

  1. “The Rains of Castamere,” Season 3, Episode 9 // 9.9
  2. “Hardhome,” Season 5, Episode 8 // 9.9
  3. “Battle of the Bastards,” Season 6, Episode 9 // 9.9
  4. “The Winds of Winter,” Season 6, Episode 10 // 9.9
  5. “The Spoils of War,” Season 7, Episode 4 // 9.8
  6. “Blackwater,” Season 2, Episode 9 // 9.7
  7. “The Children,” Season 4, Episode 10 // 9.7
  8. “The Laws of Gods and Men,” Season 4, Episode 6 // 9.7
  9. “The Mountain and the Viper,” Season 4, Episode 8 // 9.7
  10. “The Lion and the Rose,” Season 5, Episode 2 // 9.7
  11. “The Door,” Season 6, Episode 5 // 9.7
  12. “Baelor,” Season 1, Episode 9 // 9.6
  13. “And Now His Watch Is Ended,” Season 3, Episode 4 // 9.6
  14. “The Watchers on the Wall,” Season 4, Episode 9 // 9.6
  15. “Fire and Blood,” Season 1, Episode 10 // 9.5
  16. “The Dance of Dragons,” Season 5, Episode 9 // 9.5
  17. “The Dragon and the Wolf,” Season 7, Episode 7 // 9.5
  18. “Valar Morghulis,” Season 2, Episode 10 // 9.4
  19. “Home,” Season 6, Episode 2 // 9.4
  20. “You Win or You Die,” Season 1, Episode 8 // 9.3
  21. “The Queen’s Justice,” Season 7, Episode 3 // 9.3
  22. “A Golden Crown,” Season 1, Episode 6 // 9.2
  23. “Mhysa,” Season 3, Episode 10 // 9.2
  24. “Mockingbird,” Season 4, Episode 7 // 9.2
  25. “Book of the Stranger,” Season 6, Episode 4 // 9.2
  26. “Winter is Coming,” Season 1, Episode 1 // 9.1
  27. “The Wolf and the Lion,” Season 1, Episode 5 // 9.1
  28. “The Pointy End,” Season 1, Episode 8 // 9.1
  29. “The Old Gods and the New,” Season 2, Episode 6 // 9.1
  30. “Kissed by Fire,” Season 3, Episode 5 // 9.1
  31. “Second Songs,” Season 3, Episode 8 // 9.1
  32. “Two Swords,” Season 4, Episode 1 // 9.1
  33. “The Gift,” Season 5, Episode 7 // 9.1
  34. “Mother’s Mercy,” Season 5, Episode 10 // 9.1
  35. “Beyond the Wall,” Season 7, Episode 6 // 9.1
  36. “A Man Without Honor,” Season 2, Episode 7 // 9.0
  37. “Stormborn,” Season 7, Episode 2 // 9.0
  38. “The North Remembers,” Season 2, Episode 1 // 8.9
  39. “What Is Dead May Never Die,” Season 2, Episode 3 // 8.9
  40. “Garden of Bones,” Season 2, Episode 4 // 8.9
  41. “The Ghost of Harrenhal,” Season 2, Episode 5 // 8.9
  42. “The Prince of Winterfell,” Season 2, Episode 8 // 8.9
  43. “The Climb,” Season 3, Episode 6 // 8.9
  44. “Valar Dohaeris,” Season 3, Episode 1 // 8.9
  45. “Walk of Punishment,” Season 3, Episode 3 // 8.9
  46. “Breaker of Chains,” Season 4, Episode 3 // 8.9
  47. “Oathkeeper,” Season 4, Episode 4 // 8.9
  48. “Eastwatch,” Season 7, Episode 5 // 8.9
  49. “The Kingsroad,” Season 1, Episode 2 // 8.8
  50. “Cripples, Bastards, and Broken Things,” Season 1, Episode 4 // 8.8
  51. “The Bear and the Maiden Fair,” Season 3, Episode 7 // 8.8
  52. “First of His Name,” Season 5, Episode 5 // 8.8
  53. “Sons of the Harpy,” Season 5, Episode 4 // 8.8
  54. “Oathbreaker,” Season 6, Episode 3 // 8.8
  55. “Lord Snow,” Season 1, Episode 3 // 8.7
  56. “Dark Wings, Dark Words,” Season 5, Episode 2 // 8.7
  57. “Kill the Boy,” Season 5, Episode 5 // 8.7
  58. “The Broken Man,” Season 6, Episode 7 // 8.7
  59. “Dragonstone,” Season 7, Episode 1 // 8.7
  60. “The Night Lands,” Season 2, Episode 2 // 8.6
  61. “The Wars to Come,” Season 5, Episode 1 // 8.6
  62. “The House of Black and White,” Season 5, Episode 2 // 8.6
  63. “High Sparrow,” Season 5, Episode 3 // 8.6
  64. “The Red Woman,” Season 6, Episode 1 // 8.6
  65. “Blood of My Blood,” Season 6, Episode 6 // 8.5
  66. “No One,” Season 6, Episode 8 // 8.5
  67. “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms,” Season 8, Episode 2 // 8.2
  68. “Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken,” Season 5, Episode 6 // 8.1
  69. “Winterfell,” Season 8, Episode 1 // 7.9
  70. “The Long Night,” Season 8, Episode 3 // 7.8
  71. “The Bells,” Season 8, Episode 5 // 6.5
  72. “The Last of the Starks,” Season 8, Episode 4 // 5.9
  73. “The Iron Throne,” Season 8, Episode 6 // 4.6

6 Things You Might Have Missed in 'The Iron Throne,' Game of Thrones's Series Finale

Gwendoline Christie in "The Iron Throne," Game of Thrones's series finale
Gwendoline Christie in "The Iron Throne," Game of Thrones's series finale
Helen Sloan, HBO

No matter how you feel about "The Iron Throne," Game of Thrones's series finale, it goes without saying that many fans of the show are in a state of mourning right now. One of the greatest shows in television history has come to an end. And while the ending, unsurprisingly, didn't please everyone, we're still sad to see the series go.

You can, of course, re-watch Game of Thrones at any time—and a repeat viewing of the finale might be a good idea. Emotions were running high during the final episode, which means that you might have missed a few small-but-important details.

1. The Opening Sequence Tweak that Signified the End of the Lannisters' Reign

Game of Thrones's opening credits are regularly tweaked to illustrate changes within the Seven Kingdoms. So it would make sense that the finale’s opening credits contained a few adjustments to account for the destruction of King’s Landing in "The Bells." One change that might have gone unnoticed by many was that above the Iron Throne, the lion head representing House Lannister was absent, signaling that Cersei Lannister was no longer the queen.

2. Daenerys's Depiction as the Angel of Death

Many fans on social media were quick to point out how beautiful the shot of Drogon flying up behind Daenerys was toward the beginning of the episode, which momentarily made it look as if the Mother of Dragons had her own wings. But it also made her look like an angel of death, with the dark lighting and considering the darker tone of the scene. This, of course, seemed to foreshadow her death, which came shortly thereafter at the hands of Jon Snow.

3. An Obvious Nod to The Lord of the Rings

There are multiple references to The Lord of the Rings throughout Game of Thrones, but the finale saw one major parallel between the two fantasy franchises. As Vanity Fair predicted, Game of Thrones's Iron Throne basically became the ring from The Lord of the Rings. And unfortunately, that brings up a comparison between Daenerys and Gollum.

“Like Tolkien’s Ring of Power, the Iron Throne seems to corrupt and breaks all who touch it and all that would possess it. You win the game of thrones, or you die. Daenerys may want the throne the most, and, arguably, has done the most to get it,” Vanity Fair wrote.

Ultimately, the final episode showed the Iron Throne being destroyed—just as the ring was in The Lord of the Rings—and Daenerys was brought down with it. While it’s difficult to see similarities between Dany and a character like Gollum, they did meet very similar fates.

4. Brienne’s Callback to Season 4

Although Brienne of Tarth had her heart broken by Jaime Lannister, she still took it upon herself to fill out his history in the White Book during the finale. We saw the pair discuss this “duty of the Lord Commander” back in season 4, as Vanity Fair pointed out. In the scene, Jaime told Brienne that there was “still plenty of room” on his page. So after his death, Brienne, now the head of the Kingsguard, respectfully recorded all of Jaime’s heroic acts, concluding with how he “died protecting his queen.”

5. Tormund's Prediction of Jon’s Fate

As a fan on Reddit had theorized earlier in the season, it seems Tormund knew that Jon would be back at Castle Black after the battle at King’s Landing. During their farewell at Winterfell, the wildling was not convinced the two would never see each other again. After embracing, Tormund told Jon, “You got the north in you, the real north.” Some thought the conversation hinted at Jon’s fate in the finale, and they were spot-on.

6. The Series' Final Scene Mirroring the Series' First Scene

While countless events have happened between the show’s pilot and its finale—events that changed Westeros forever—the final moments of "The Iron Throne" were almost identical to the opening scene in Game of Thrones's pilot episode. As the finale saw Jon going back up north with the wildlings, we get a scene of them traveling beyond the wall. This is similar to how the series started, which showed a few members of the Night’s Watch treading into the same unknown territory.

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