10 Unusual Easter Candies You Can Buy Online in Time for the Holiday

iStock.com/bhofack2
iStock.com/bhofack2

You may have heard the news that Cadbury Creme Eggs, pastel-colored candy corn, and marshmallow Peeps are the most-hated Easter candies, according to the results of a recent survey. But what about zombie chocolate bunnies, sparkly "Bunny Corn," and Pancakes and Syrup Peeps? If you’re hoping to fill a basket with some alternative candies this Easter—if for no other purpose than to prank your kids or significant other—then this is the list for you. Here are 10 weird and wonderful sweets that are for sale online right now (some of them in bulk!), from macabre chocolates to oddly flavored jelly beans.

1. Bunny’s Berries

Bunny's Berries candy

FancyPants FunTime, Amazon

Mmm … bunny droppings. The Bunny's Berries package claims that there’s “a little bit of poop in every bite”—but at least they taste like tropical fruit. The speckled candies come from the same company that makes “Santa’s Surprise” and “Unicorn Poop,” all of which make great gag gifts for friends, family, or coworkers with a sense of humor.

Buy them on Amazon for $8.

2. Unicorn Barf

Unicorn Barf cotton candy

Unicornucopia, Amazon

While we’re still discussing the bodily functions of adorable animals, let us offer another treat that kids will love: Unicorn Barf. This magical tub of cotton candy lets you “retaste the rainbow.” More specifically, the colors correspond with six flavors: cherry, peach, pineapple, lime, blueberry, and grape.

Buy it on Amazon for $10.

3. Sparkling Bunny Corn

Bunny Corn
Jelly Belly, Amazon

Candy corn in all its forms tends to generate strong reactions. But even if you hate the sugary nuggets, you have to admit that these sparkly “Bunny Corn” candies would look pretty sitting in a decorative dish on your table.

Buy it from Jelly Belly for $7 on Amazon for $9 per 7.5-ounce bag.

4. Pancakes and Syrup Peeps

Pancakes and syrup-flavored Peeps

Peeps & Company, Amazon

If you love all things marshmallow, you might want to try some of the stranger Peeps varieties on offer, like the limited-edition pancakes and syrup flavor. One reviewer recommends freezing them, while another swears that they taste like the “creme brûlée of marshmallows” when roasted over an open fire. If you’re really feeling bold, you can get them in a variety pack that also comes with Peeps that taste like cotton candy, party cake, and root beer floats.

Buy them on Amazon for $5 for 20 chicks or from the Peeps online store for $2 per 10-pack.

5. Chocolate Zombie Bunnies

Zombie bunny chocolates

J&J Chocolates, Etsy

Blood-covered zombie bunnies might seem too gruesome for an Easter basket, but then again, there is a popular children’s book about a vampire rabbit (remember Bunnicula?). These hand-painted confections from J&J Chocolates come in your choice of milk, white, or dark chocolate.

Buy it on Etsy for $7.

6. Cadbury Screme Eggs

A Cadbury Screme Egg
Cadbury, Amazon

These are more of a Halloween novelty, but if you’re feeling a little ornery, you can hand them out at Easter, too. If someone bites into the egg without reading the label, they might be shocked to discover that the fondant in the center is green, not white and yellow.

Buy them on Amazon for $20 for a pack of 42.

7. Purple Rain Tiny Jelly Bird Eggs

Brach's Purple Rain jelly beans

Brach's, Amazon

Finally: An Easter candy created specifically for Prince fans who also happen to like berry-flavored jelly beans. It’s a niche product, but we’re still happy it exists. These beans come in four flavors: mixed berry, blueberry, blue raspberry, and grape.

Buy them on Amazon for $28 for three bags.

8. Sour Patch Bunnies

Sour Patch Bunnies
Sour Patch, Walmart

Sour Patch Kids were already a pretty popular candy, but you can now enjoy an Easter-themed version of these tart treats. Bunnies have replaced the original candy shape for a limited time. More bizarrely, Sour Patch Kids Marshmallows have been spotted at some Walmart stores this year, but they don’t appear to be available online at the moment.

Buy the Sour Patch Bunnies from Walmart for $1 per 3.1-ounce box or on Amazon for $11 for 12 boxes.

9. Ice Cream-Flavored Starburst Jellybeans

Starburst ice cream jellybeans
Starburst, Target

If you love Starbursts and ice cream, you’ll probably love these jelly beans. They come in strawberry, orange sherbet, red raspberry, and lemon sorbet flavors. Despite the creamy taste, they maintain the candy's classic chewy texture, according to Target.

Buy them from Target for $3 per bag or on Amazon for $6.

10. Bunny-Shaped Reese's Puffs Cereal

Reeses's Puff Bunnies

Reese's, Walmart

OK, so this one is a bit of an outlier, but it’s certainly sweet enough to pass for candy. General Mills has replaced the cereal’s eponymous puffs with chocolatey and peanut buttery bunnies just in time for the holiday. Could there be a more suitable breakfast for Easter morning?

Buy it from Walmart for $4.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

The Reason Why 'Doritos Breath' Stopped Being a Problem

iStock/FotografiaBasica
iStock/FotografiaBasica

In the 1960s, Frito-Lay marketing executive Arch West returned from a family vacation in California singing the praises of toasted tortillas he had sampled at a roadside stop. In 1972, his discovery morphed into Doritos, a plain, crispy tortilla chip that was sprinkled with powdered gold in the form of nacho cheese flavoring.

Doritos enthusiasts were soon identifiable by the bright orange cheese coating that covered their fingers. But there was another giveaway that they had been snacking: a garlic-laden, oppressive odor emanating from their mouths. The socially stigmatizing condition became known as "Doritos breath." And while the snack still packs a potent post-mastication smell, it’s not nearly as severe as it was in the 1970s and 1980s. So what happened?

Like most consumer product companies, Frito-Lay regularly solicits the opinions of focus groups on how to improve their products. The company spent more than a decade compiling requests, which eventually boiled down to two recurring issues: Doritos fans wanted a cheesier taste, and they also wanted their breath to stop wilting flowers.

The latter complaint was not considered a pressing issue. Despite their pungent nature, Doritos were a $1.3 billion brand in the early 1990s, so clearly people were willing to risk interpersonal relationships after inhaling a bag. But in the course of formulating a cheesier taste—which the company eventually dubbed Nacho Cheesier Doritos—they found that it altered the impact of the garlic powder used in making the chip. Infused with the savory taste known as umami, the garlic powder was what gave Doritos their lingering stink. Tinkering with the garlic flavoring had the unintended—but very happy—consequence of significantly reducing the smell.

“It was not an objective at all,” Stephen Liguori, then-vice president of marketing at Frito-Lay, told the Associated Press in April 1992. “It turned out to be a pleasant side effect of the new and improved seasoning.”

Frito-Lay offered snack-sized bags of the new flavor and enlisted former heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman to promote it. Ever since, complaints of the scent of Doritos wafting from the maws of co-workers have been significantly reduced, and the Nacho Cheesier variation has remained the Doritos flavor of choice among consumers.

When Arch West died in 2011 at the age of 97, his family decided to sprinkle Doritos in his grave. They were plain. Not because of the smell, but because his daughter, Jana Hacker, believed that mourners wouldn’t want nacho cheese powder on their fingers.

Recall Alert: King Arthur Flour Sold at Aldi and Walmart Recalled Due to E. Coli Concerns

iStock/KenWiedemann
iStock/KenWiedemann

A new item has been pulled from supermarket shelves in light of an E. coli outbreak, NBC 12 reports. This time, the product being recalled is King Arthur flour, a popular brand sold at Aldi, Walmart, Target, and other stores nationwide.

The voluntarily product recall, announced by King Arthur Flour, Inc. and the FDA on Thursday, June 13, affects roughly 114,000 bags of unbleached all-purpose flour. The flour is made from wheat from the ADM Milling Company, which has been linked to an ongoing E. coli outbreak in the U.S. Though none of the cases reported so far have been traced back to King Arthur flour, the product is being taken off the market as a precaution.

Five-pound bags of unbleached all-purpose flour from specific lot codes and use-by dates are the only King Arthur products impacted by the recall. If you find King Arthur flour in the grocery store or in your pantry at home, check for this dates and numbers below the nutrition facts to see if it's been recalled.

Best used by 12/07/19 Lot: L18A07C
Best used by 12/08/19 Lots: L18A08A, L18A08B
Best used by 12/14/19 Lots: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

E. coli contamination is always a risk with flour, which is why raw cookie dough is still unsafe to eat even if it doesn't contain eggs. The CDC warns that even allowing children to play or craft with raw dough isn't a smart idea.

[h/t NBC 12]

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