45 Offbeat Holidays to Celebrate in April

iStock.com/jhayes44
iStock.com/jhayes44

Spring is in the air—and with these offbeat holidays, there's more than just the weather to celebrate. (Even if you don’t like pranks or chocolate Bunnies.)

  1. April 2: National Ferret Day

    We'll definitely be celebrating these furry little guys.

  1. April 2: National Love Your Produce Manager Day

    Let’s give it up for all produce men and women everywhere.

  1. April 2: International Children's Book Day

    Celebrated since 1967, this holiday takes place on Hans Christian Andersen's birthday. 

  1. April 3: Tweed Day

    Summer is coming, so dust off your favorite tweed clothing item and get in one last wear before it's crop top and linen season.

  1. April 4: National Tell-A-Lie Day

    Honesty is generally the best policy, according to one of our founding fathers. But today, you have carte blanche to fib your heart out.

  1. April 5: National Deep Dish Pizza Day

    Deep fish pizza with candles in it
    iStock.com/liveslow

    A day to appreciate sky-high pies, or argue over the best pizza in all the land.

  1. April 5: Read a Road Map Day

    There was a time not so long ago when we had to consult large, folded pieces of paper to figure out directions from point A to point B. Thanks to GPS and Google Maps, this is now practically a holiday of antiquity. But you can’t use a Sharpie to draw a route on your smartphone, so score one for the road map.

  1. April 6: Tartan Day

    Show off your Scottish heritage, and grab your kilt while you're at it.

  1. April 6: International Pillow Fight Day

    Have a pillow fight

  1. April 6: Sorry Charlie Day

    This holiday was inspired by Charlie the Tuna—the cartoon mascot for StarKist and the subject of an advertising campaign that ran until the 1980s. In the spots, Charlie purports to have good taste, and wants to be recruited by the company, but is perpetually rejected via a sign on a fish hook that reads, "Sorry, Charlie." (As the narrator explains, they're interested in tuna that tastes good, not tuna with good taste.) The ads spawned a national catchphrase, and this holiday seeks to recognize all those who have lived through rejection and still retain their spunk.

  1. April 7: International Beaver Day

    Ferrets aren't the only small mammals we love here at Mental Floss: International Beaver Day will warrant its own party, too.

  1. April 7: National Beer Day

    A group of friends celebrating with beer
    iStock.com/skynesher

    On March 22, 1933, Franklin Roosevelt signed the Cullen–Harrison Act, legalizing the sale of beer (as long as it was 3.2 percent alcohol by weight or less) after many years of Prohibition. The thirsty public had to wait two long weeks before they could legally imbibe again, and on April 7, the law finally went into effect. Beer drinkers around the country rejoiced, and celebrated with a nice cold one, presumably.

  1. April 7: International Snailpapers Day

    You might not know the term snailpapers, but it refers to newspapers (the name works both for the rolled-up shape and the relatively slow news delivery in the internet age)—and this offbeat commemoration is a good excuse to grab a piece of print.

  1. April 9: National Library Workers Day

    A day to honor the hardworking shushers and Dewey Decimal devotees who help us all on our reading journeys.

  1. April 10: National Siblings Day

    Celebrate the brothers and sisters who drive you mad and keep you sane—often all at the same time.

  1. April 11: Barbershop Quartet Day

    Consider a musical ode to these fearsome foursomes on their special day of the year.

  1. April 11: International “Louie Louie” Day

    "Louie Louie" is, by some accounts, the most recorded rock song in history. (The most famous version was recorded by The Kingsmen in 1963.) This year, celebrate this offbeat holiday by finally figuring out the lyrics.

  1. April 12: National Licorice Day

    A pile of black and red licorice
    iStock.com/icelandr

    This offbeat holiday—designed to celebrate black licorice specifically—will surely be a contentious commemoration. For those of you who cringed, please enjoy your Twizzlers.

  1. April 12: Drop Everything and Read Day

    Also known as D.E.A.R. Day, this holiday encourages you to abandon all prior commitments for the comfort of a good book. It also coincides with the birthday of children’s book author Beverly Cleary, who is a spokesperson for the event. Though marketed toward children, the celebration is open to everyone. 

  1. April 12: Walk On Your Wild Side Day

    Whatever “wild” means to you, today's the day to do it.

  1. April 13: National Scrabble Day

    Created by Alfred Mosher Butts in 1938, Scrabble did not become a national phenomenon until the 1950s. It has since inspired less mobility-impaired games like Bananagrams and Words With Friends. But to honor the holiday, use a classic board and show off your robust vocabulary.

  1. April 14: National Reach as High as You Can Day

    National Reach as High as You Can Day is really about grounding yourself in reality. Don’t reach for the stars if you can’t actually touch them—know your limitations. Set attainable goals, and take pleasure in being just good enough.

  1. April 15: National That Sucks Day

    It's Tax Day and the anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, so yeah, kind of sucky.

  2. April 16: National Stress Awareness Day

    Stressed out young woman pulling her hair out in front of a yellow background
    iStock.com/SIphotography

    Founded on the very cute notion that you are not aware of your stress.

  3. April 17: National Haiku Poetry Day

    Celebrate with your
    Own haiku that is likely
    Much better than mine.

  1. April 18: National High Five Day

    Make 'em count today, and don't forget to keep an eye on the elbow.

  1. April 18: Amateur Radio Day

    Observed every April 18, this holiday is for radio amateurs and pioneers worldwide. It also celebrates the anniversary of the International Amateur Radio Union, which was formed in Paris in 1925.

  1. April 19: National Hanging Out Day

    Sadly, this is not a day to kick back and relax with some friends. Rather, it's a holiday encouraging people to hang out their laundry—and cut down on energy consumption by doing so.

  1. April 20: Lima Bean Respect Day

    Much like Rodney Dangerfield, the lima bean doesn’t get any respect. Well not today! Did you know lima beans are an excellent source of fiber? They also help balance your blood sugar and lower cholesterol. So give this bean a break and try extolling its more admirable qualities for the day.

  1. April 21: National Bulldogs Are Beautiful Day

    A pair of bulldogs pose for a portrait
    iStock.com/Luka Lajst

    If you didn't already know this, you can see yourself out.

  1. April 22: National Jelly Bean Day

    When you grab a handful to celebrate this year, just make sure you don't get "BeanBoozled."

  1. April 22: Dyngus Day

    According to Buffalo’s official holiday website, “Historically a Polish-American tradition, Dyngus Day celebrates the end of the often restrictive observance of Lent and the joy of Easter.” Some celebratory activities include men chasing around women to drench them with water, and hitting them with pussy willow branches. So basically, Dyngus Day is spring break.

  1. April 23: Talk Like Shakespeare Day

    We have of late, but wherefore we know not, lost all our mirth. What a perfect day to get it back! In honor of the Bard’s birthday, drop some thous and thees, master iambic pentameter, and cast people away by exclaiming “get thee to a nunnery!” Talk Like Shakespeare Day is the one time of year you can express yourself in rhyming couplets; wethinks thou oughtest useth the opportunity.

  1. April 23: World Book Night

    On Shakespeare's birthday passionate volunteers hand out books in the U.S., U.K., Ireland and Germany.

  1. April 23: National English Muffin Day

    It may not be as flashy as a bagel, as versatile as sliced bread, or as controversial as a sliced bagel, but the English muffin deserves some serious accolades—as do its many nooks and crannies.

  2. April 25: World Penguin Day

    Antarctica gentoo penguins fighting
    iStock.com/Grafissimo

    Seriously, all the animal holidays are fine with us.

  3. April 25: International DNA Day

    Unlike many holidays in the Offbeat Family, DNA Day has formal U.S. Congressional recognition. On this day in 1953, scientists first published papers in Nature on the structural makeup of DNA [PDF]. In 2003, the Human Genome Project was declared to be nearly complete; the National Human Genome Research Institute has since developed activities and celebrations to honor the holiday.

  1. April 26: Hug An Australian Day

    It does not say they have to be human. Also: Learn some Australian slang while you’re at it.

  1. April 26: National Pretzel Day

    The beer is optional.

  1. April 26: National Hairball Awareness Day

    Don't become a statistic.

  1. April 27: National Go Birding Day

    Build bird feeders, bring your binoculars for a walk in the woods, or, if you live in the city, take a little extra time to notice all the pigeons.

  1. April 27: Morse Code Day

    Wartime Morse Code Communications
    iStock.com/cjp

    Break out your best dots and dashes, it’s the birthday of Samuel Morse—co-inventor of the eponymous Morse Code. These days any Joe Schmoe can try his hand at transmitting lights, clicks, and tones to send a secret message. But this system of communication used to be a highly specialized field that required a license and a proclivity for spying on communists.

  1. April 27: World Tai Chi And Qigong Day

    A day to calm your mind and discover that the seniors in your local park are in far better shape than you.

  1. April 30: National Honesty Day

    Remember when you celebrated National Tell-A-Lie Day a few weeks ago? Today, do the opposite.

  1. April 30: International Jazz Day

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is responsible for this holiday. Schools, communities, and even government organizations around the world will host programs to highlight the diplomatic role of jazz in bringing people together.

Oscar Mayer Is Renting Out the Wienermobile on Airbnb For Overnight Stays

Airbnb
Airbnb

Oscar Mayer is about to make all of your hot dog dreams come true. To celebrate National Hot Dog Day (today), the meat-industry titan has listed its legendary Wienermobile on Airbnb for overnight stays. Mark your calendars for July 24, when reservation opportunities will go live throughout the day, with prices starting at $136 per night.

Oscar Mayer Wienermobile on Airbnb
Airbnb

The 27-foot-long locomotive hot dog, parked in Chicago, can accommodate two people and includes a sofa bed, sitting area, and outdoor space with a bathroom and “hot dog picnic zone” where you can lounge in Adirondack chairs while enjoying a savory snack. The 'mobile will also be packed with all the hot dog amenities you didn’t know you needed: Highlights include a mini fridge stocked with hot dogs and Chicago-style fixings, a custom Wienermobile art piece by Chicago artist Laura Kiro, and an Oscar Mayer roller grill that you get to keep forever. And that’s not the only souvenir: each guest will also receive a welcome kit with as-yet-unidentified “hot dog-inspired accessories.”

Other features include air conditioning, free parking, breakfast, a hair dryer, and the essentials: towels, bed sheets, soap, shampoo, and toilet paper.

Interior of Wienermobile on Airbnb
Airbnb

Interior of Wienermobile on Airbnb
Airbnb

The booking dates overlap with Chicago’s famed Grant Park music festival Lollapalooza, which takes place from August 1 through 4. The lineup this year includes Ariana Grande, Childish Gambino, Tame Impala, The Strokes, and Kacey Musgraves, to name a few. What better way to stay nourished and well-rested after a musical marathon than in a cozy, oblong automobile filled with meat?

If you can't book a Wienermobile getaway, you can still celebrate July as National Hot Dog Month by hosting your own hot dog picnic wherever you are (just make sure you know the proper way to plate, dress, serve, and chow down on a plate full of frankfurters).

Check out the full listing on Airbnb.

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The Proper Way to Eat a Hot Dog

martinedoucet/iStock via Getty Images
martinedoucet/iStock via Getty Images

Attention America: you're probably eating hot dogs the wrong way, which is pretty embarrassing when you consider how much you love them.

The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, a part of the American Meat Institute, has an official etiquette guide for hot dog-eating, in order to do the summer staple justice. Surprisingly, many of the rules are intended to prevent people from getting too fancy with their franks.

How to plate your hot dog

No need for fancy garnishes—keep the presentation simple. Sticking with the laid-back theme, be sure to only use plain buns or those with poppy or sesame seeds. Even if they're your favorite, the council's website says "sun-dried tomato buns or basil buns are considered gauche with franks," so you might want to stay away.

How to Dress your hot dog

Dressing your hot dog is also a bigger deal than you might think. First, there's an order to follow. Wet condiments (mustard or chili, for example) go on first, followed by chunky ingredients—if you're putting onions or sauerkraut on your hot dog, this is the time to do it. Next comes cheese. Spices, such as pepper or celery salt, come last.

The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council also has rules about ketchup, much to the dismay of Internet commenters. According to the council, no person over the age of 18 should top their hot dog with ketchup, despite the fact that over half of all Americans use the condiment. Former council president Janet Riley (the so-called "Queen of Wien") is shocked by this: "Ketchup’s popularity was the big surprise, considering our etiquette rules—and ketchup’s notable absence from regional hot dog favorites like the Chicago Dog and the New York Dog."

How to serve your hot dog

According to the Council, always use low-maintenance dishes. Paper plates are preferable, but any everyday dish will do. Want to eat your hot dog off fine china? Sorry, that's a faux pas. Finally, if you're serving cocktail wieners, use colored toothpicks instead of plain ones. Cocktail forks are in poor taste, according to Riley.

How to eat your hot dog

Because hot dogs are such casual foods, you should never use a fork and knife. Instead, always use your hands for any hot dog on a bun. While you're at it, make sure you take no more than five bites to finish your frank (although seven is acceptable for foot-longs). Make sure you eat every part of the hot dog, including any leftover parts of the bun.

Finally, make sure your beverage of choice doesn't outshine the food. Wine shouldn't be paired with hot dogs. Instead, opt for beer, soda, lemonade, iced tea … really, anything that doesn't clash with your non-ketchup topping.

How to clean up after your hot dog meal

If you find yourself covered in mustard (or whatever else you put on your hot dog that isn't ketchup), there's also a way to clean up. Use paper napkins to clean your face—cloth napkins are never okay—but make sure that you lick off any condiments that you find on your fingers.

Finally, if you attend a hot dog barbecue, you don't send a thank you note. While a thoughtful gesture, the council notes that it "would not be in keeping with the unpretentious nature of hot dogs."

Want more advice from the council? The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council put together this handy video, featuring the Queen of Wien herself, boasting all the rules, some patriotic music, and a couple great food puns.

This story originally ran in 2015.

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