Dogfish Head and Kodak Team Up to Create Beer That Develops Super 8 Film

Dogfish Head
Dogfish Head

As digital technology has advanced and smartphones have become ubiquitous, the Super 8 movie cameras of the 1960s, '70s, and '80s have practically gone extinct. Dogfish Head and Kodak are collaborating on a product that makes the format a lot more convenient for modern amateur filmmakers. According to the Associated Press, their new SuperEIGHT beer doubles as a developer for Super 8 film.

Unlike digital video, which is ready to view as soon as its recorded, Super 8 film needs to be chemically processed first. In 2018, the founder and CEO of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery Sam Calagione went on Kodak's podcast The Kodakery to talk about analog film. There he learned that certain beers with high acidity and vitamin C content can be used to develop old-fashioned film.

Following that conversation, Dogfish Head joined forces with Kodak to create a beer specifically for that purpose. The new SuperEIGHT beer is a sour German-style wheat beer with 5.3 percent alcohol content. The key ingredients include blackberry, boysenberry, elderberry, raspberry, kiwi, mango, prickly pear, quinoa, and Hawaiian sea salt. According to Dogfish Head, the drink "has a slightly tart taste and pleasantly refreshing finish, with delicious flavors of berries and watermelon." And if imbibers can resist drinking it all, they can use some to develop their home movies.

The SuperEIGHT beer from Dogfish Head will be available at retailers across the country this April. To see how well it works as a processing agent, check out the short film Kodak developed with the beer below.

[h/t AP]

This London Pub Might Be the Most Ethical Bar in the World

Ridofranz/Getty Images
Ridofranz/Getty Images

Pub owner Randy Rampersad is doing his part for sustainability. In June, he opened the Green Vic—a play on the fictional Queen Vic pub in the soap opera EastEnders—in the East London neighborhood of Shoreditch. The Telegraph reports it’s aiming to be the world’s most ethical pub: Rampersad eschews plastic and paper straws and opts for gluten-free wheat “straws.” He sources the bar's 100 percent recycled toilet paper from green-minded company Who Gives a Crap, and the communal wooden tables are upcycled.

“I wanted to make the world a better place and run my own business, but I was waiting for that eureka moment,” Rampersad told The Telegraph. He discovered no one had done anything like this before.

There’s no meat on the menu—the food is totally vegan, healthy-ish pub grub. You can add CBD oil to the “chkn" bites appetizer, and the burgers are made from ingredients like soy, seaweed, and sweet potato. The beers are produced by ethical brewers, too: Toast Ale uses unsold loaves and crusts of bread; Good Things Brewing crafts its beer from 100 percent renewable energy; South Africa’s Afro Vegan Cider donates money to an organization that funds equal pay for female farmers; and Brewgooder donates to water projects.

In fact, everything the Green Vic does has charity in mind. “We don't care about the money, I’m planet first and profit after,” Rampersad told The Telegraph. Up to 80 percent of its profits will go to charitable causes, including local food banks. As for the staff, one in four are from marginalized groups. The Green Vic plans to operate as a three-month pop-up pub while scouting for longer term investment.

Blue Point Brewing Company's New Bubble Gum Beer Has a Garbage Pail Kids Twist

Blue Point Brewing Company
Blue Point Brewing Company

Craving the taste of 1980s nostalgia? Long Island-based Blue Point Brewing Company's new bubble gum-flavored IPA, Bubble Brain, smells like Bazooka Joe but tastes more like a less-sweet fruity brew, with a tart and bitter finish. Even those who aren’t keen on IPAs might like it, as the deep rose-hued drink looks like wine and doesn’t taste as hoppy as some IPAs and pale ales.

To give the beer an added throwback vibe, Blue Point (an Anheuser-Busch InBev company) tapped Garbage Pail Kids illustrator Brent Engstrom to design the label, which features a rendering of Blue Point’s brewmaster Mike "Stoney" Stoneburg, who came up with the beer.

"It’s a small batch, bubble gum beer, driven by fruit, spices, and yeast,” Barry McLaughlin, Blue Point Brewing’s marketing director, told Forbes. “It’s all inspired by a visit to a dusty novelty store on the west side of town and finding a bit of lost nostalgia of our ‘80s youth.”

“The juicy New England and milkshake IPA styles have become extremely popular, as well as fruited, kettle sours," McLaughin said of the beer's IPA-meets-sour flavor. "As brewers, we wanted to highlight the things we love about all of these styles but also take some risks and push the drinker’s experience further in a new, sub-style of IPA."

According to the beer review site Untapped, some drinkers have described the 6.5 percent ABV Bubble Brain as “weird,” “wild,” and “tastes just like bubble gum.”

You can find the beer—and a sip of yesterday—in pastel-colored tall boy four-packs at select retail outlets in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Connecticut, and at Blue Point’s brewpub in Patchogue, New York.

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