How Seiichi Miyake and Tactile Paving Changed the World for Visually Impaired People

iStock.com/RonBailey
iStock.com/RonBailey

More than 140 years after Louis Braille invented the Braille reading system, Seiichi Miyake came up with a different system based on touch that allows visually impaired people to navigate public spaces. Today, tactile paving is used by major cities and transportation services around the world. Miyake was so influential that he's the subject of the Google Doodle for March 18, the 52nd anniversary of tactile paving's debut.

The Japanese inventor designed the influential system with a specific person in mind. His friend was losing his vision, so in 1965, Miyake used his own money to build special mats with raised shapes that lead blind and visually impaired people away from danger and toward safety. Pavement with round bumps was meant to signal nearby danger, such as a street crossing or the edge of a train platform, while a stretch of pavement with straight bars was meant to guide them to safe areas. The tactile design allowed pedestrians to detect the features with canes, guide dogs, or their feet.

Originally called Tenji blocks, the tactile pavement was first installed outside the Okayama School for the Blind in Okayama, Japan in 1967. They quickly spread to larger cities, like Tokyo and Osaka, and within a decade, Miyake's system was mandatory in all Japanese rail stations.

Seiichi Miyake died in 1982 at age 56, but the popularity of his invention has only grown since his death. In the 1990s, the U.S., the UK, and Canada embraced tactile pavement in their cities. Miyake's initial design has been built upon throughout the years; there are now pill-shaped bumps to indicate changes in direction and raised lines running perpendicular to foot traffic to signal upcoming steps. And even though they're often thought of as tools for blind people, the bright colors used in tactile pavement also make them more visible to pedestrians with visual impairments.

This Stunning Tiny ‘Cliff’ House on Amazon Costs $105,000 (and Up)

Q-haus, Amazon
Q-haus, Amazon

Tiny houses are cheaper, simpler, and definitely more portable than full-sized homes, and thanks to online retailers, they're easier to purchase. On Amazon, you can shop for pre-fabricated tiny houses in between adding toilet paper and bed sheets to your cart. One of the latest minimalist structures Amazon has sold is a "Cliff" house with a few luxurious amenities you won't find in many conventional homes.

For $105,000, the third-party seller Q-haus will ship you its Cliff model in two ready-to-assemble modules, according to Southern Living. The 774-square-foot house is modular and can have two to three bedrooms and one to two bathrooms. The bathrooms—which are where many tiny homes cut corners—are spacious enough to house either a bath tub or a sauna. The space also boasts built-in furniture, smart-home technology, an outdoor terrace, and tall windows for letting in lots of natural light.

The Cliff is definitely cheaper than most brick-and-mortar homes on the market, but as Realtor.com warns, the Amazon price tag may be deceiving. Unless you're a skilled professional, you'll likely need to hire contractors to put the components of the home together for you. Add that to the cost of the land and the concrete foundation for the home's footprint and you're looking at a bill that's much larger than the $105,000 you'd pay up front.

Tiny homes may also seem like a good option if you're looking for new place to live immediately. But transitioning to tiny house life is rarely as easy as putting together a structure and calling it home. Zoning laws, insurance, and storage are all factors tiny home owners need to contend with before moving into their new abode.

Q-haus's Cliff design sold out shortly after it hit Amazon, and there's no indication of when or if it will be back in stock. But if you still have your heart set on downsizing your lifestyle, there are plenty of tiny dwellings available on Amazon for much cheaper prices.

[h/t Southern Living]

Want to Repurpose Old or Damaged Books? Turn Them Into DIY Wall Art

Svitlana Unuchko/iStock via Getty Images
Svitlana Unuchko/iStock via Getty Images

Many bibliophiles see their books as more than just reading material. Whether they're color-coded, stored backwards, or stacked around the house in teetering piles, books can double as decorations that add coziness and character to a space. This interior design trend spotted by Today pushes this concept to new heights by transforming old books into pieces of sprawling wall art.

Erin Kern, the Oklahoma designer behind the blog Cotton Stem, first had the idea to make books into DIY art in 2015. Her concept works with any books you have at home that you can bear to part with. Just grab a staple gun, secure the book covers to the wall you wish to embellish, and then use staples, glue, or tape to arrange the pages of the book however you like them. You can keep the book open to your favorite page or use some clever craft work to make the pages look like they're frozen mid-flip. As you expand the piece, you can add single pages or pages without their covers to vary the design.

Kern and other designers who've created their own versions of the project often combine old books with other types of wall decor. You can nestle framed prints of literary quotes or tuck air plants among the pages. Ana Ochoa of the blog Fiddle Leaf Interiors used hanging books as a makeshift canvas for a larger-than-life painting.

If seeing books stapled to a wall makes you cringe, rest assured that no one is suggesting you buy brand-new books to use as your crafting materials. This project is a great way to repurpose old books you never plan to read again—especially books with tears and missing pages that are too damaged to donate.

Looking for more literary design inspiration? Check out these pieces of furniture made out of books.


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[h/t Today]

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