CLOSE
Original image
Pop Chart Lab

Four Floral Posters Featuring 200 Flowers

Original image
Pop Chart Lab

The latest from PopChart Labs brings a veritable botanical garden of blooms to your wall with a series of four floral posters. After settling on four popular North American flower varieties—roses, sunflowers, peonies and tulips—the creative team drew up a pleasantly-cluttered scheme featuring 50 colorful species from each. Each blossom is accompanied by its delightfully evocative name. Sunflowers can be "Chocolates," "Buttercreams," or "Lemon Queens." Peonies range from "Buckeye Belles" to "Do Tells" to "Big Bens." Roses come in not just red but also "Purple Tiger," "Gold Blush," and "Blue Moon." And tulips can be your "Sweetheart," "Olympic Flame," or "American Dream."

The buds themselves are beautiful, but the folks at PopChart Labs thought the posters should be more charty. "So we set out to scientifically label the parts of each flower, from stem to stamen," the creative team said. "This meant examining each flower very closely in addition to simply admiring them as objects of outward beauty, giving us new appreciation of the subject."

They also learned some fun facts about the different flowers along the way. Did you know sunflowers are actually made up of many, many miniature flowers called ray florets and disk florets?

The posters are available individually or as a Bouquet Box Set.

arrow
photography
This Is What Flowers Look Like When Photographed With an X-Ray Machine
Original image
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Peruvian Daffodil” (1938)

Many plant photographers choose to showcase the vibrant colors and physical details of exotic flora. For his work with flowers, Dr. Dain L. Tasker took a more bare-bones approach. The radiologist’s ghostly floral images were recorded using only an X-ray machine, according to Hyperallergic.

Tasker snapped his pictures of botanical life while he was working at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital in the 1930s. He had minimal experience photographing landscapes and portraits in his spare time, but it wasn’t until he saw an X-ray of an amaryllis, taken by a colleague, that he felt inspired to swap his camera for the medical tool. He took black-and-white radiographs of everything from roses and daffodils to eucalypti and holly berries. The otherworldly artwork was featured in magazines and art shows during Tasker’s lifetime.

Selections from Tasker's body of work have been seen around the world, including as part of the Floral Studies exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego in 2016. Prints of his work are also available for purchase from the Stinehour Wemyss Editions and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)

X-ray image of a rose.
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “A Rose” (1936)

All images courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery.

Original image
iStock
arrow
video
125 Million Years Ago, One of the World's Very First Flowers Bloomed
Original image
iStock

Ferocious dinosaurs roamed the Earth during the early Cretaceous Period (145 to 100 million years ago), but beneath their giant feet, a tiny—yet important—evolutionary movement was beginning to take root. During the previous Jurassic Era, the world had been filled with ferns, conifers, and cycads, and nary a flower bloomed. This changed around 125 million years ago, our fossil records show, when one of the word’s very first flowers, Archaefructus liaoningensis, sprouted in what is now northeastern China. This preserved plant marks the beginning of angiosperms, which are fruiting plants that rely on animals to spread their capsule-enclosed seeds.

In the video below, PBS Eons explains why angiosperms were so important to early life on Earth, and how they took over the world to eventually account for more than 80 percent of the world’s terrestrial plants.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios