What Is a Bomb Cyclone?

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The phrase bomb cyclone has re-entered the news this week as parts of the central U.S. face severe weather. Mountain and Midwestern states, including Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota, all fall in the path of a winter storm expected to deliver tornadoes, hail, heavy snow, flooding, and hurricane-force winds on Wednesday, March 13 into Thursday. It seems appropriate for a storm that strong to have bomb in its name, but the word actually refers to a meteorological phenomenon and not the cyclone's explosive intensity.

According to The Denver Post, the bomb in bomb cyclone stands for bombogenesis. Bombogenesis occurs when a non-tropical storm experiences at least a 24 millibar (the unit used to measure barometric pressure) drop within 24 hours. Low pressure makes for intense storms, so a bomb cyclone is a system that's built up a significant amount strength in a short length of time.

This type of storm usually depends on the ocean or another large body of water for its power. During the winter, the relatively warm air coming off the ocean and the cold air above land can collide to create a sharp drop in atmospheric pressure. Also known as a winter hurricane, this effect has produced some of the worst snowstorms to ever hit the U.S.

The fact that this latest bomb cyclone has formed nowhere near the coast makes it even more remarkable. Rather, a warm, subtropical air mass and a cold, Arctic air mass crossed paths, creating the perfect conditions for a rare bombogenesis over the Rockies and Great Plains states.

Central U.S. residents in the bomb cyclone's path have taken great precautions ahead of the storm. Over 1000 flights have been canceled for Wednesday and schools throughout Colorado have closed.

[h/t The Denver Post]

A Pile of Manure and a Heat Wave Combined to Cause Spain’s Worst Wildfire in 20 Years

Lumppini, iStock/Getty Images Plus
Lumppini, iStock/Getty Images Plus
A pile of manure in Spain ignited on June 27, sparking a wildfire that has torn through more than 10,000 acres of forest and other Catalonian landscapes, CNN reports. The manure combusted in part because of a scorching heat wave that has swept across Europe this week; temperatures in the affected region hit 104°F, and Germany, Poland, and the Czech Republic all reached record-breaking June temps. Catalan regional interior minister Miquel Buch reported that authorities believe the manure was improperly stored on a chicken farm in the village of La Torre de l’Espanyol, where it was exposed to the worst of the heat, according to NBC News. The wildfire—Spain’s most devastating in 20 years—is affecting the region just west of Tarragona, a port city that is best known for its Roman ruins, which is situated along the Balearic Sea about 60 miles southwest of Barcelona. [[{"fid":"315211","view_mode":"width-constrained-728","fields":{"format":"width-constrained-728","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","field_image_subhead[und][0][value]":"","field_image_subhead[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_credits[und][0][value]":"PeterHermesFurian%2C%20iStock%2FGetty%20Images%20Plus","field_credits[und][0][format]":"unfiltered"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"width-constrained-728","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","field_image_subhead[und][0][value]":"","field_image_subhead[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_credits[und][0][value]":"PeterHermesFurian%2C%20iStock%2FGetty%20Images%20Plus","field_credits[und][0][format]":"unfiltered"}},"link_text":false,"attributes":{"alt":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","height":728,"width":728,"class":"media-element file-width-constrained-728","data-delta":"1"}}]] The firefighting force includes about 350 firefighters, 12 fire engines, seven aircraft, two hydroplanes, and additional vehicles equipped with water tanks—all of which are techniques regularly used to fight massive blazes. Though high temperatures are expected to continue and the rough terrain itself is also a contributing factor in the rapid spread of the fire, the strong winds should soon abate; authorities have warned people to stay inside. Though more than 50 people have been evacuated from the area, no deaths have been reported thus far. While the spontaneous combustion of flammable materials like manure, hay, or compost is definitely possible, as evidenced by this situation, it’s not the most common way for wildfires to start. More common causes include lit cigarettes, unattended campfires, burning debris, and engine sparks. [h/t CNN]

Colorado Welcomed Summer With 2 Feet of Snow

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

While people in some parts of the country celebrated the first day of summer with barbecues and trips to the beach, residents of north and north-central Colorado had a snow day. Areas west of Denver—including Grand Lake, Aspen, and Steamboat Springs—experienced snow storms on summer solstice, with snowfall totaling nearly 2 feet at the highest elevations, CBS Denver reports.

Snow started falling in the Rocky Mountains the morning of Friday, June 21 and continued Sunday. Areas at ground level weren't cold enough to experience the unusual weather, but at elevations of 7000 feet and above, it looked like a winter wonderland. Steamboat Springs, a ski resort town in Colorado’s Yampa Valley, accumulated 20 inches of snow on the longest day of the year.

While Colorado mountain towns are used to seeing snow at odd times of year, the weekend's weather was still out of the ordinary. The average snowfall for Steamboat Springs in June is 0.1 inches. Prior to last Friday, it had been 91 years since a snowstorm hit the city in late June.

Snow has fallen in the Rockies later than average in six out of the past seven years. Though it feels like an extension of winter, the trend may actually be a product of the warming atmosphere. A warmer climate affects the jet stream, potentially pushing its course further south and leading to unusual weather patterns, such as unseasonable snowstorms in Colorado.

That means residents of some parts of the state will have to wait to have their summer hikes and picnics. The weather was serious enough to shut down one road in Rocky Mountain National Park.

[h/t CBS Denver]

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