CLOSE

This Time Lapse of Ice Cream Melting is Totally Mesmerizing

 

Watch ice cream melt into technicolor puddles—and then reform, as the film rewinds. There's something very satisfying about watching melted vanilla get sucked back into its chocolate casing.

What's neat about these melted ice cream scoops is the amount of diversity in colors and textures. Each scoop has a different color syrup, sprinkles, and sometimes glitter. As the ice cream melts, it creates a marbled waterfall of sugary, glittery cream. 

So what's going on when ice cream melts? 

First, a high school science refresher. Whether something is a solid, liquid, or gas depends on how much energy it has. Water vapor has a lot of energy (molecules moving very fast and far apart), while ice has very little (molecules moving slowly and close together). Energy (heat) likes to travel to places where it's needed, so if you put an ice cube in the sun, it absorbs energy and eventually melts and becomes water. On the flip side, if you put water in a freezer, the energy leaves the water to enter the colder space and the water freezes. 

Why does ice cream melt differently? 

As you might have noticed while eating a Mr. Softee cone, regular ice cream melts much more quickly than ice. Ice cream has a lot of fat in it, which is what creates the tasty treat's richness, taste, and texture; it also plays a big role in how fast the ice cream will melt. Low-fat ice creams have a lot more water and therefore need to absorb a lot more energy before melting. 

It's also worth noting that ice cream is not frozen solid like ice cubes are. Sweeteners lower the freezing point and keep the substance from freezing into a hard block. As a result, the ice cream melts differently. Layers of melted cream slide off because it reacts more quickly to the heat. 

In case you were wondering: The song in the background is All There Is by Chrome Sparks.

arrow
Afternoon Map
The Richest Person of All Time From Each State


Looking for inspiration in your quest to become a billionaire? This map from cost information website HowMuch.net, spotted by Digg, highlights the richest person in history who hails from each of the 50 states.

More billionaires live in the U.S. than in any other country, but not every state has produced a member of the Three Comma Club (seven states can only lay claim to millionaires). The map spans U.S. history, with numbers adjusted for inflation. One key finding: The group is overwhelmingly male, with only three women represented.

The richest American by far was John D. Rockefeller, repping New York with $257.25 billion to his name. Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Microsoft's Bill Gates clock in at the third and fifth richest, respectively. While today they both make their homes in the exclusive waterfront city of Medina, Washington, this map is all about birthplace. Since Gates, who is worth $90.54 billion, was born in Seattle, he wins top billing in the Evergreen State, while Albuquerque-born Bezos's $116.57 billion fortune puts New Mexico on the map.

The richest woman is South Carolina's Anita Zucker ($3.83 billion), the CEO of InterTech Group, a private, family-owned chemicals manufacturer based in Charleston. Clocking in at number 50 is the late, great socialite Brooke Astor—who, though a legend of the New York City social scene, was a native of New Hampshire—with $150 million.

[h/t Digg]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
arrow
fun
There’s a Ghost Hiding in This Illustration—Can You Find It?
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

A hidden image illustration by Gergely Dudás, a.k.a. Dudolf
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

Gergely Dudás is at it again. The Hungarian illustrator, who is known to his fans as “Dudolf,” has spent the past several years delighting the internet with his hidden image illustrations, going back to the time he hid a single panda bear in a sea of snowmen in 2015. In the years since, he has played optical tricks with a variety of other figures, including sheep and Santa Claus and hearts and snails. For his latest brainteaser, which he posted to both his Facebook page and his blog, Dudolf is asking fans to find a pet ghost named Sheet in a field of white bunny rabbits.

As we’ve learned from his past creations, what makes this hidden image difficult to find is that it looks so similar to the objects surrounding it that our brains just sort of group it in as being “the same.” So you’d better concentrate.

If you’ve scanned the landscape again and again and can’t find Sheet to save your life, go ahead and click here to see where he’s hiding.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios