Want a Year of Free Flights from JetBlue? Delete All Your Instagram Posts

Allison Joyce, Getty Images
Allison Joyce, Getty Images

For those who love to travel, the chance to win a year's worth of free, unlimited flights from JetBlue Airways is perhaps an even greater reward than winning cold hard cash. There's a catch, though. As The Hill reports, anyone who enters JetBlue's ongoing "All You Can Jet" sweepstakes will have to delete every photo from their Instagram profile first.

That's right: Every selfie, #latergram, and picturesque plate of food must be purged, per JetBlue's official rules. In addition, entrants are asked to use a photo tool on JetBlue's website to create an image with the following overlay text: "All you can [insert word of your choice here]." For example, other entries say things like "All you can relax," "All you can explore," and "All you can ski." To finish entering, upload the photo to Instagram, and be sure to tag @JetBlue and use the hashtag #allyoucanjetsweepstakes. (Also, keep in mind that your Instagram page must be public, not private.)

Posing what is perhaps an even greater challenge, entrants must also refrain from posting other photos to Instagram until the sweepstakes ends at midnight on March 9. (However, entries must be submitted by 9 a.m. on March 8.) Only one entry per person is allowed, and the contest is open to residents of the U.S. and Puerto Rico who are 18 or older.

At the end of the contest period, three grand prize winners will be selected randomly. Each winner will receive free air travel for themselves and a companion—a deal worth roughly $20,000. If you're fine with wiping your Instagram clean, third-party apps like InstaClean and Cleaner for IG let you delete photos en masse. And if you don't want to lose your images, TechJunkie has a post explaining how to download Instagram photos.

[h/t The Hill]

Welcome to Cool, California. Population: 2520

Alan Levine, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Alan Levine, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

It’s not hard to find U.S. towns with some pretty weird (and sometimes depressing) names, so we shouldn't be surprised that people have the option of settling in the tiny town of Cool, California.

Initially named Cave Valley, due to the limestone formations nearby, the town popped up around 1849 during the California Gold Rush. The population eventually grew to 4100 people.

It's unclear when the town went from Cave Valley to being Cool. One legend suggests that a beatnik named Todd Hausman bequeathed the name after passing through in the 1950s, but the veracity of that story is doubtful since the Cool Post Office was founded as early as 1885. According to Condé Nast Traveler, records show that a reverend named Peter Y. Cool came out to pan gold and settled in the town in 1850, possibly serving as the source of the change.

Whatever the origin of its name, the town of Cool has ample branding opportunities. There’s the Cool Grocery Store and the Cool Beerwerks brewery and restaurant, which specializes in Hawaiian-Japanese fusion cuisine. Cool has held the Way Too Cool 50K Endurance Run every year since 1990.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

A Picturesque Region of Southern Italy Wants to Pay People $770 a Month to Move There

Freeartist/iStock via Getty Images
Freeartist/iStock via Getty Images

If you’ve been toying with the idea of moving to southern Europe and opening a quaint inn ever since you first saw Mamma Mia! in 2008, it’s time to dust off your overalls and get packing. Molise, Italy, will pay you about $770 each month for three years if you promise to establish a business in one of its underpopulated villages.

The campaign aims to bolster Italy’s population numbers and provide areas with the culture, commerce, and infrastructure needed to keep those numbers up. “If we had offered funding, it would have been yet another charity gesture,” Molise president Donato Toma told The Guardian. “We wanted people to invest here … It’s a way to breathe life into our towns while also increasing the population.”

The government will, however, supplement the newcomer program with actual funding—about $11,000—for participating villages, which must have fewer than 2000 residents. And, if an ABBA-inspired inn isn’t the name of your game, Toma also suggested a bakery, a stationery shop, or a restaurant.

Molise, a mountainous region southeast of Rome, boasts spectacular cliffside views, sweeping olive groves, and bucolic tranquility. Why, then, aren’t people clamoring to move there for free? Partially because Italy is currently enduring a nationwide population crisis that has hit Molise especially hard.

According to the Italian National Institute of Statistics, the region has lost 9000 residents since 2014, and 2800 of those were from last year alone. The Guardian explains that young people are seeking job opportunities elsewhere in Europe, and those who stay aren’t starting families. Last year, for example, nine of Molise’s towns had no new births to report. Overall, Italy’s population of resident citizens fell by 677,000 between 2014 and 2018, and it’s second only to Japan on the list of countries with the largest proportion of senior citizens.

Enticing prospective residents with small salaries is only one method of combating the plummeting population numbers. The mayor of Sutera, in Sicily, has offered his empty estates to Libyan asylum seekers, while Sambuca, also in Sicily, is selling abandoned houses for about a dollar.

[h/t The Guardian]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER