Test Your Color Perception Skills (and See How They Stack Up Against Your Fellow Humans)

iStock.com/scyther5
iStock.com/scyther5

Being able to perceive a wide spectrum of colors takes more than great eyesight. Your color perception depends on several factors, including your color vocabulary, your home country, and the languages you speak. That's part of why two people can look at the same image of a dress and see completely different color schemes.

To test how your color perception stacks up against the rest of the population, take the free color test from Lenstore UK below. You'll be given a series of tasks, such as identifying the lightest shade of a certain color, matching two identical shades, and filling in a gradient color pattern with the missing hue. After answering 10 questions, the test tells you how many you got right.

Don't be too upset if you didn't do as well as you had hoped: Less than 1 percent of the 2000 people Lenstore surveyed scored a perfect 10 out of 10. The most common score was 6 out of 10, with 24.1 percent of respondents getting this result.

Lenstore also found that test results varied by demographic: Typically, women perceive colors better than men, and elderly people perceive them more poorly than younger adults (color perception peaks in both men and women in their early 30s). When breaking down the data by country, people from Cyprus came out on top, with an average test score of 6.6 out of 10. Additionally, speaking two or more languages boosted the test-taker's chances of earning a higher score.

The way we talk about color plays a big role in how we perceive it. There are five more base colors in the Japanese language than there are in English, including distinct words for yellow-green and light blue. And scholars have long been puzzled by Homer's description of a "wine-dark" sea in The Odyssey—a possible indication that words to describe dark blue hadn't been invented in that part of the world yet.

One way to potentially improve your color perception is by broadening your color vocabulary. Lenstore's study found that people with a greater knowledge of color names scored higher on the test. You can find some color names you've likely never heard of here.

Now You Can Wear Your Favorite Dunkin' Coffee Flavor as Nail Polish

Dunkin'
Dunkin'

Dunkin'—the coffee chain formerly known as Dunkin' Donuts—is getting into the beauty business. For a limited time, nail polish inspired by Dunkin's flavored coffees will be available at select nail salons across the country.

The nail polish line includes eight freshly brewed shades. Three pay homage to Dunkin's new signature lattes—cocoa mocha, caramel craze, and blueberry crisp—and three are inspired by the seasonal Baskin-Robbins ice cream-flavored coffees: butter pecan, pistachio almond fudge, and banana split. Nail polishes in Dunkin's iconic pink and orange color palette are also available.

The collection is a collaboration between Dunkin' and the vegan-friendly nail polish company Lauren B. Beauty. While supplies last, the products will be available at certain nail salons in 10 cities where Dunkin' operates, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, and Boston. Each purchase of the branded nail polish comes with a $3 Dunkin' gift card. To see if a salon in your area is participating, check out the map below.

Dunkin' isn't the first fast food chain to release its own nail polish line. In 2016, KFC released edible "finger-licking" nail polish that, yes, tasted like chicken.

Australian Family Walking Dog Named Lucky Discovers $24,000 Gold Nugget

iStock.com/scyther5
iStock.com/scyther5

An Australian dog named Lucky has lived up to his name. As the Bendigo Advertiser reports, a family from Bendigo in Victoria were walking their pet on May 12 when they literally stumbled upon a hunk of rock resembling gold on the ground. Experts have confirmed that the 20-ounce nugget is indeed gold, and in its intact state it's worth an estimated $24,000.

A father and his two daughters—who wish to remain anonymous—were taking their dog Lucky for a morning walk when one of the girls hit something with her foot. She noticed it wasn't an ordinary rock, and asked her Dad if it might be gold. He suspected it was and took their find to a nearby supermarket to weigh it on the deli scale.

Weighing over a pound, the gold nugget could earn the family a small fortune if they wish to sell it. The father says he does plan to find a buyer eventually; he had been struggling financially, and he told the Bendigo Advertiser the lucky event "couldn't be better timing."

The family has decided to keep the location of the discovery a secret. They plan to go for more walks in the area in hopes of striking gold twice.

[h/t Bendigo Advertiser]

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