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20 Vintage Photos of Brooklyn

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In 1898, Brooklyn became an official borough of New York. Before that, it was its own independent city, and it was a hectic, diverse metropolis in its own right. If you think Brooklyn has gone through a lot of changes in the past ten years, check out these photos to see what life was like long ago in New York's most populous borough.

The Brooklyn Bridge

1877: A group of men pose on one of the cables on the Brooklyn Birdge mid-construction. 5,000 strands of steel wire make up the massive cables of the bridge. It took 14 years to complete construction.

1883: People walk on the bridge, while a policeman stands guard. The bridge is 5989 feet long and connects Manhattan and Brooklyn.

1926: Four men who wish to be hired to paint the Brooklyn Bridge balance on its beams as a test to see if they can handle the heights.

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1898: Curve at Brooklyn Terminal, New York & Brooklyn Bridge / Geo. P. Hall & Son, photographers, New York.

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1905: A young boy stands on the bridge, out of focus.

Coney Island

1890: People flock to the beautifully ornate entrance to Luna Park in Coney Island.

1890: Luna Park lit up and running.

1890: A crowd watches a not-at-all terrifying parade outside of Luna Park.

1927: Film director King Vidor (far right horse) and cast members of the movie The Crowd—James Murray, Eleanor Boardman and Estelle Clark—enjoy the rides.

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The "Razzle Dazzle" ride at Coney Island (date unknown).

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1901: The log flume ride makes a big splash.

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1900: A ground level view of the ride.

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1903: The Loop the Loop at Coney Island. Looks terrifying!

People of Brooklyn

1925: Herman Frics was once an owner of a saloon but then made some changes. In this picture, he had become an evangelist and principal supporter of the Hand Of God Mission of Brooklyn, New York. Behind him is his church on wheels, which transports him to less fortunate areas to preach.

1933: Baseball players Hack Wilson of the Brooklyn Dodgers and Dazzy Vance of the St. Louis Cardinals hang out at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn.

1938: An airplane flies over downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn. The plane is taking Howard Hughes (1905-1976) and his crew around the world in four days.

Brooklyn Museum

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1905: The dome gallery, featuring some very stylish light fixtures.

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1905: Exterior of the Brooklyn Museum.

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1905: The Brooklyn Museum's gallery of natural history.  

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1905: The ceramics gallery.

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All images courtesy of Getty Images unless otherwise stated.

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Courtesy of the Tunisian National Heritage Institute and the University of Sassari
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Stones, Bones, and Wrecks
Archaeologists Discover Ancient Sunken City in the Mediterranean
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Courtesy of the Tunisian National Heritage Institute and the University of Sassari

Early on July 21, 365 CE, an 8.5 magnitude earthquake shook the eastern Mediterranean, triggering a powerful tsunami. The Egyptian city of Alexandria was damaged, towns crumbled on the island of Crete, and the Roman port city of Neapolis, located on the coast of North Africa, was largely swallowed by the wave, according to historical records. Now, after being hidden under water for more than 16 centuries, the remains of Neapolis have been discovered by archaeologists off the coast of northeast Tunisia. This, according to the AFP, confirms accounts that the city was a casualty of the ancient natural disaster.

Following several years of exploration, researchers from the Tunisian National Heritage Institute and the University of Sassari in Italy have discovered nearly 50 acres of watery ruins near the modern-day city of Nabeul. They include streets, monuments, homes, mosaics, and around 100 tanks used to make garum, a fish-based sauce that was so popular in ancient Rome and Greece that it's been likened to ketchup. 

These containers suggest that Neapolis was likely a major producer of garum, making the salty condiment an integral part of the city's economy. "Probably the notables of Neapolis owed their fortune to garum," expedition head Mounir Fantar told the AFP.

Neapolis ("new city" in Greek) was originally founded in the 5th century BCE. While it was an important Mediterranean hub, its name doesn't appear too often in ancient writings. According to The Independent, it may because the city sided with the ancient city-state of Carthage—founded in the 9th century BCE by a seafaring people known as the Phoenicians—in the last of a series of three wars, called the Punic Wars, against Rome.

The Third Punic War stretched from 149 to 146 BCE, and led to the burning of Carthage. (It was later rebuilt as a Roman city by Julius Caesar.) Neapolis may have been punished for its wayward allegiance, which may explain why it's rarely mentioned in historical accounts.

You can view a video of the city's ruins below.

[h/t AFP]

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Stones, Bones, and Wrecks
Archaeologists Find Italy's Earliest Wine—And It's Thousands of Years Older Than We Thought
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Uncork a Barolo in honor of ancient traditions: Italians have been making wine for far longer than we thought. A new analysis of storage jars found in a cave in Sicily's Monte Kronio pushes back Italy’s wine-making history by thousands of years, as CNET alerts us.

Archaeologists from the University of South Florida and several Italian institutions report in Microchemical Journal that wine making in the region could date back as far as 3000 BCE. Previously, researchers studying ancient seeds hypothesized that Italy's wine production developed sometime between 1300 BCE and 1100 BCE.

Making grapes into wine has been a part of human history going back to the Stone Age. Georgians have been drinking wine for 8000 years. Grapevines spread through the Caucasus and the Middle East before making their way to Europe.

This new discovery was possible thanks to chemical analysis of unglazed clay pots found in a Monte Kronio cave. The Copper Age pottery still bore residue from the wine. The researchers were able to identify traces of tartaric acid and sodium salt left from the wine-making process. They're still working on figuring out whether it was red or white, though, as University of South Florida researchers explained in a press statement.

In 2013, archaeologists planted a vineyard and began making wine using ancient Roman techniques to see what wine actually tasted like in the Roman Empire. Foul as that wine may have been, it seems that Roman wine was the result of an even longer wine-making tradition than we knew.

[h/t CNET]

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