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Great Ads for Cat Adoption During Adopt-A-Cat Month

ACCT Philly
ACCT Philly

June is almost over, but there’s still a week left in Adopt-A-Cat Month from the American Humane Association. The spring crop of kittens are old enough to go to new families and there are plenty of mature cats who need a place to call home. To this end, many animal shelters are going the extra mile to grab your attention and many offer special discounts on pet adoptions. They also come up with clever and enticing ads to pique your interest.

In 2012, the Shelter Pet Project ran an ad campaign that turned cats into little comedians. Their thoughts may be well represented, though, because the things humans do can be inexplicable. The campaign included quite a few funny videos, too.

We just missed this event! Anjellicle Cats Rescue in New York City had a Downton Tabby event at PetCo last week. Each cat had a poster outlining his/her personality and selling points, which you can see in a gallery at Gothamist.

But Anjellicle Cats Rescue also has a campaign in which they latch onto World Cup fever by featuring cats rooting for different countries. It’s called FIFA Cats! Shown here is today’s entry. Also see cats for the USA, Germany, France, and more.

The Seattle Animal Shelter is offering adult cats for a low $5 adoption fee. The fee covers spay or neutering, vaccinations, Fe-Leuk testing, microchip implant, and two cans of cat food. What a bargain! The $5 offer also goes for rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas, birds, turtles, and snakes through June 29th. The poster here is from last year’s June adoption event.

The Boone Area Humane Society in Boone, Iowa, has a great ad and a great deal on cat adoption through the end of this month.

Some even reference particular models, and don’t forget to ask for the catfax!

Graphic artist Alix Sobler created this ad for The Winnipeg Humane Society campaign a few years back. The sentiment is still the same- adopting a cat is the best ten pounds you’ll ever gain.

ACCT (Animal Care and Control Team) Philly in Philadelphia is offering cats with special discounts, and cats over five years old can be adopted at no charge during June. They also have special promotions that change every week. The whole point is to find homes for the many cats who need them.

The Animal Humane Society of Minnesota had some clever bus ads a few years ago, reminding us of one huge benefit of owning a cat.

The Homeless Animal Adoption League in Bloomfield, New Jersey, posts pictures of adoptable pets on their Facebook page, but they also have a habit of dressing them up as image macros that make you just want to hug them all!

Your local shelter may be offering some great deals in June on cats who need loving homes. If you don’t know how to find your local shelter, just enter your zip code into Petfinder.

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Rebecca O'Connell (Getty Images) (iStock)
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entertainment
How Frozen Peas Made Orson Welles Lose It
Rebecca O'Connell (Getty Images) (iStock)
Rebecca O'Connell (Getty Images) (iStock)

Orson Welles would have turned 103 years old today. While the talented actor/director/writer leaves behind a staggering body of work—including Citizen Kane, long regarded as the best film of all time—the YouTube generation may know him best for what happened when a couple of voiceover directors decided to challenge him while recording an ad for Findus frozen foods in 1970.

The tempestuous Welles is having none of it. You’d do yourself a favor to listen to the whole thing, but here are some choice excerpts.

After he was asked for one more take from the audio engineer:

"Look, I’m not used to having more than one person in there. One more word out of you and you go! Is that clear? I take directions from one person, under protest … Who the hell are you, anyway?"

After it was explained to him that the second take was requested because of a “slight gonk”:

"What is a 'gonk'? Do you mind telling me what that is?"

After the director asks him to emphasize the “in” while saying “In July”:

"Why? That doesn't make any sense. Sorry. There's no known way of saying an English sentence in which you begin a sentence with 'in' and emphasize it. … That's just stupid. 'In July?' I'd love to know how you emphasize 'in' in 'in July.' Impossible! Meaningless!"

When the session moved from frozen peas to ads for fish fingers and beef burgers, the now-sheepish directors attempt to stammer out some instructions. Welles's reply:

"You are such pests! ... In your depths of your ignorance, what is it you want?"

Why would the legendary director agree to shill for a frozen food company in the first place? According to author Josh Karp, whose book Orson Welles’s Last Movie chronicles the director’s odyssey to make a “comeback” film in the 1970s, Welles acknowledged the ad spots were mercenary in nature: He could demand upwards of $15,000 a day for sessions, which he could use, in part, to fund his feature projects.

“Why he dressed down the man, I can't say for sure,” Karp says. “But I know that he was a perfectionist and didn't suffer fools, in some cases to the extreme. He used to take a great interest in the ads he made, even when they weren't of his creation.”

The Findus session was leaked decades ago, popping up on radio and in private collections before hitting YouTube. Voiceover actor Maurice LaMarche, who voiced the erudite Brain in Pinky and the Brain, based the character on Welles and would recite his rant whenever he got the chance.

Welles died in 1985 at the age of 70 from a heart attack, his last film unfinished. While some saw the pea endorsement as beneath his formidable talents, he was actually ahead of the curve: By the 1980s, many A-list stars were supplementing their income with advertising or voiceover work.

“He was a brilliant, funny guy,” Karp says. “There's a good chance he'd think the pea commercial was hilarious.” If not, he’d obviously have no problem saying as much.

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How Google Chrome’s New Built-In Ad Blocker Will Change Your Browsing Experience
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If you can’t stand web ads that auto-play sound and pop up in front of what you’re trying to read, you have two options: Install an ad blocker on your browser or avoid the internet all together. Starting Thursday, February 15, Google Chrome is offering another tool to help you avoid the most annoying ads on the web, Tech Crunch reports. Here’s what Google Chrome users should expect from the new feature.

Chrome’s ad filtering has been in development for about a year, but the details of how it will work were only recently made public. “While most advertising on the web is respectful of user experience, over the years we've increasingly heard from our users that some advertising can be particularly intrusive,” Google wrote in a blog post. “As we announced last June, Chrome will tackle this issue by removing ads from sites that do not follow the Better Ads Standards.

That means the new feature won’t block all ads from publishers or even block most of them. Instead, it will specifically target ads that violate the Better Ad Standards that the Coalition for Better Ads recommends based on consumer data. On desktop, this includes auto-play videos with sound, sticky banners that follow you as you scroll, pop-ups, and prestitial ads that make you wait for a countdown to access the site. Mobile Chrome users will be spared these same types of ads as well as flashing animations, ads that take up more than 30 percent of the screen, and ads the fill the whole screen as you scroll past them.

These criteria still leave room for plenty of ads to show up online—the total amount of media blocked by the feature won’t even amount to 1 percent of all ads. So if web browsers are looking for an even more ad-free experience, they should use Chrome’s ad filter as a supplement to one of the many third-party ad blockers out there.

And if accessing content without navigating a digital obstacle course first doesn’t sound appealing to you, don’t worry: On sites where ads are blocked, Google Chrome will show a notification that lets you disable the feature.

[h/t Tech Crunch]

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