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ACCT Philly

Great Ads for Cat Adoption During Adopt-A-Cat Month

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ACCT Philly

June is almost over, but there’s still a week left in Adopt-A-Cat Month from the American Humane Association. The spring crop of kittens are old enough to go to new families and there are plenty of mature cats who need a place to call home. To this end, many animal shelters are going the extra mile to grab your attention and many offer special discounts on pet adoptions. They also come up with clever and enticing ads to pique your interest.


In 2012, the Shelter Pet Project ran an ad campaign that turned cats into little comedians. Their thoughts may be well represented, though, because the things humans do can be inexplicable. The campaign included quite a few funny videos, too.


We just missed this event! Anjellicle Cats Rescue in New York City had a Downton Tabby event at PetCo last week. Each cat had a poster outlining his/her personality and selling points, which you can see in a gallery at Gothamist.


But Anjellicle Cats Rescue also has a campaign in which they latch onto World Cup fever by featuring cats rooting for different countries. It’s called FIFA Cats! Shown here is today’s entry. Also see cats for the USA, Germany, France, and more.


The Seattle Animal Shelter is offering adult cats for a low $5 adoption fee. The fee covers spay or neutering, vaccinations, Fe-Leuk testing, microchip implant, and two cans of cat food. What a bargain! The $5 offer also goes for rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas, birds, turtles, and snakes through June 29th. The poster here is from last year’s June adoption event.


The Boone Area Humane Society in Boone, Iowa, has a great ad and a great deal on cat adoption through the end of this month.


Some even reference particular models, and don’t forget to ask for the catfax!


Graphic artist Alix Sobler created this ad for The Winnipeg Humane Society campaign a few years back. The sentiment is still the same- adopting a cat is the best ten pounds you’ll ever gain.


ACCT (Animal Care and Control Team) Philly in Philadelphia is offering cats with special discounts, and cats over five years old can be adopted at no charge during June. They also have special promotions that change every week. The whole point is to find homes for the many cats who need them.


The Animal Humane Society of Minnesota had some clever bus ads a few years ago, reminding us of one huge benefit of owning a cat.


The Homeless Animal Adoption League in Bloomfield, New Jersey, posts pictures of adoptable pets on their Facebook page, but they also have a habit of dressing them up as image macros that make you just want to hug them all!

Your local shelter may be offering some great deals in June on cats who need loving homes. If you don’t know how to find your local shelter, just enter your zip code into Petfinder.

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Design
This Amazing Clock Has a Different Hand for Every Minute of the Day
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iStock

In the video below, you can watch Japanese ad agency Dentsu transform passing time into art. According to Adweek, the project was commissioned by Japanese stationery brand Hitotoki, which produces crafting materials. To celebrate the value of handmade items in an increasingly fast-paced world, Dentsu created a film advertisement for their client depicting their goods as a stop-motion clock.

The timepiece ticks off all 1440 minutes in the day, and was assembled in real-time against a colored backdrop during a single 24-hour take. Its "hands" were crafted from different combinations of some 30,000 disparate small items, including confetti, cream puffs, tiny toys, silk leaves, and sunglasses.

"In a world where everything is so hectic and efficient, we wanted to bring the value of 'handmade' to life," explains Dentsu art director Ryosuke Miyashita in a press statement quoted by Stash Media. "We created different combinations of small Hitotoki brand items to express each and every minute."

You can check out a promotional video for the project below, which details the arduous crafting process, or view a real-time version of the clock here.

[h/t Adweek]

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History
The Time Walter Cronkite Angered R.J. Reynolds
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LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images

If you’re a stickler for the correct usage of “who” versus “whom,” or if you find yourself seething over the “10 Items or Less” sign at the grocery store, you have something in common with Walter Cronkite.

As a respected journalist and news anchor, Cronkite was very careful about his words, from his enunciation of them to the tone in which he said them—so you can imagine his indignation at being asked to deliver a line with purposely incorrect grammar.

In 1954, shortly after being named the host of a morning show on CBS, Cronkite was tasked with a live-read of a Winston cigarette ad. Though it’s hard to imagine Anderson Cooper or Lester Holt concluding a segment with an earnest plug for Budweiser or McDonald’s, anchor-read endorsements were commonplace in the 1950s. Cronkite had a problem with the commercial, but it wasn’t the product he took umbrage with—it was the tagline: “Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.”

Though it may sound fine to most ears, the word “like” is actually used inappropriately. Traditionally, “like” is used as a preposition and “as” is used as a conjunction, but the Winston ad treats “like” as a conjunction, or a connecting word.

Here’s the line in action. Just a warning: If you’re a grammar purist, the phrase “tastes real good” is also sure to raise your hackles.

Cronkite refused to say the line as it was written. Instead, he delivered it the correct way: “Winston tastes good as a cigarette should.” His former English teachers may have been beaming at their television sets, but the execs at R.J. Reynolds, Winston’s parent company, weren’t so happy, and neither was their ad agency. The agency pounced on Cronkite’s correction, but he remained unapologetic. “I can’t do an ungrammatical thing like that,” he told them.

Wording wasn’t the only problem—his smoking, or lack thereof, was also an issue. Cronkite wasn’t a cigarette smoker, but after delivering the offending line to the cameras, he was supposed to take a puff from a Winston. Though he obliged, he didn’t inhale. The agency reprimanded Cronkite for that as well, feeling that a spokesperson who clearly didn’t use the product couldn't convince viewers to pick up a pack. They asked Cronkite to inhale on camera—and that’s where he drew the line. “Let’s just call this thing off,” he says he told them. “CBS was up in the rafters, of course, about it at the time.” It was Cronkite's first and only commercial.

Here’s the story straight from the anchor himself:

For the record, Cronkite wasn’t the only high-profile person who had a problem with the Winston wording. “Like goes Madison Avenue, like so goes the nation,” Ogden Nash wrote in The New Yorker.

Years later, Winston tried to capitalize on the controversy with a commercial that depicted a professor lecturing his students about the sloppily worded slogan. The students doth protest, jumping up in unison and saying, “What do you want, good grammar or good taste?”

Unimpressed, The Wall Street Journal responded to the question in a 1970 op-ed: “It doesn’t matter which you want. In a Winston ad, you don’t get either.”

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