7 Things You Might Not Know About Ash Wednesday

iStock.com/sterlsev
iStock.com/sterlsev

In 2019, millions of Christians around the world will attend an Ash Wednesday service on March 6 to mark the start of the 2019 Lenten season. The practice of marking worshippers' foreheads with ashes in the shape of a cross is one of Christianity's most visible rituals, but it's just one component of the holy day. Whether or not you observe it, here are some facts about Ash Wednesday worth knowing.

1. Not all Christians observe Ash Wednesday.

Ash Wednesday at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City in 2016.
Ash Wednesday at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City in 2016.
Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

While Ash Wednesday is perhaps most closely associated with Catholicism, there are many Christian sects that recognize it, including Lutherans, Methodists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, and some Baptists. There are also Christians that refrain from Ash Wednesday celebrations. Mormons, Evangelicals, and Pentecostal Christians are some of the denominations that don't take part in the holy day.

2. The ash has biblical significance.

A priest prepares black ashes for the Ash Wednesday ceremony in Surabaya, Indonesia in 2014.
A priest prepares black ashes for the Ash Wednesday ceremony in Surabaya, Indonesia in 2014.
Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images

The ashes used on Ash Wednesday are meant to represent dust. When receiving ashes on their foreheads, parishioners hear the words: "Remember you are dust, and to dust you shall return." This is a reference what God says to Adam when exiling him from the Garden of Eden (in the Christian Bible, Adam is literally formed from dust). On Ash Wednesday, the saying is a reminder to be humble in the face of mortality.

3. The history of Ash Wednesday is less than 1000 years old.

A minister performs an Ash Wednesday service at the Kandahar Airbase in Kandahar, Afghanistan in 2002.
A minister performs an Ash Wednesday service at the Kandahar Airbase in Kandahar, Afghanistan in 2002.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The first Ash Wednesday ceremonies were likely held sometime in 11th century CE. It's never mentioned in the Bible, but there is a verse in the Book of Daniel that links fasting to ashes, and some scholars believe this is the origin of the Lenten practice. Ash Wednesday didn't gain mainstream popularity with Christians in the U.S. until the 1970s.

4. Ashes are recycled from last Lent.

A cross and burned palm leaves in ash.
iStock.com/Coompia77

The ashes used on Ash Wednesday are surprisingly eco-friendly. On Palm Sunday, the Sunday before Easter, many churches pass out palm fronds like those used to welcome Jesus Christ to Jerusalem days before his crucifixion. Some churches save those palms to burn them and make the ashes that are applied to peoples' foreheads roughly 11 months later.

5. There are rules about what you can eat on Ash Wednesday.

New York's Cardinal Timothy Dolan joins fellow volunteers distributing food at a breadline at St. Francis Assisi on Ash Wednesday in 2012 in New York City.
New York's Cardinal Timothy Dolan joins fellow volunteers distributing food at a breadline at St. Francis Assisi on Ash Wednesday in 2012 in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ash Wednesday is a day of fasting. For many Christians, that doesn't mean abstaining from food completely: Instead, observers of the holy day should limit themselves to one whole meal plus two smaller meals that, when added up, don't equal a meal they would eat on a normal day. Christians marking Ash Wednesday should also avoid eating meat like they would on Fridays during Lent. (Filet-o-fish is still fine to eat, though.)

6. In Iceland, Ash Wednesday can look like Halloween.

A child dressed as a dragon celebrates Ash Wednesday with his parents dressed as police officers in 2011.
A child dressed as a dragon celebrates Ash Wednesday with his parents (dressed as police officers) in 2011.
ROLAND WEIHRAUCH/AFP/Getty Images

The Tuesday before Ash Wednesday is normally reserved for indulgence and revelry (think: Mardi Gras), but in Iceland, the fun doesn't stop there. The first day of Lent in Iceland, called Öskudagur, is similar to Halloween in the U.S. Kids dress up in costumes and tour their neighborhoods singing songs in exchange for candy. The holiday even makes room for mischief—in one fading tradition, kids will sometimes pin "ash bags" (often filled with grains instead of ash) to the backs of their peers when they aren't looking.

7. You can get ashes without going to church.

In celebration of Ash Wednesday, a member of the Urban Village Church rubs ashes on the forehead of a commuter outside of a subway station in Chicago in 2018.
In celebration of Ash Wednesday, a member of the Urban Village Church rubs ashes on the forehead of a commuter outside of a subway station in Chicago in 2018.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Can't make it to church on a weekday? Many parishes have started offering "ashes to go" on Ash Wednesday. Priests and pastors will often station themselves in public places—like street corners, parking lots, and public transit stops—prepared to administer blessed ashes to whoever asks to receive them.

Along those lines, you don't need to be a church leader to administer ashes. Many churches give parishioners the option to take packets of ashes home with them to apply to the foreheads of loved ones who couldn't make it to the service. Receiving ashes isn't a sacrament, so the rules surrounding it aren't as strict as they are with something like holy communion in the Catholic church.

America's 25 Best Big Cities to Live In

Biking along the boardwalk in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
Biking along the boardwalk in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
Kirkikis/iStock via Getty Images

Although many people enjoy the peace and quiet that a rural, out-of-the-way small town can offer, others thrive in big cities. Approximately 80 percent of the United States's total population live in urban areas that offer a wide range of opportunities when it comes to socializing, careers, and everyday living.

Even though living in a big city sounds pretty nice, it comes with a price (literally), as home prices are generally higher in urban areas. Given the number of people who occupy the same space, there are also other worries about air pollution and traffic. However, sometimes the good outweighs the bad.

Financial advisory site Wallethub compared 62 of the largest cities in the United States and ranked them from best to worst, based on five key indicators: affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life, and safety. In the end, they figured out each city’s weighted average among all the different dimensions in order to compile the ranked list. Where did your city fall?

  1. Virginia Beach, VA
  1. Austin, TX
  1. Seattle, WA
  1. San Diego, CA
  1. Las Vegas, NV
  1. San Francisco, CA
  1. New York, NY
  1. San Jose, CA
  1. Honolulu, HI
  1. Portland, OR
  1. Raleigh, NC
  1. Minneapolis, MN
  1. Denver, CO
  1. Colorado Springs, CO
  1. Tampa, FL
  1. Washington, DC
  1. Pittsburgh, PA
  1. Mesa, AZ
  1. Omaha, NE
  1. Boston, MA
  1. Aurora, CO
  1. Charlotte, NC
  1. Chicago, IL
  1. Atlanta, GA
  1. Arlington, TX
Source: WalletHub

The 25 Highest-Grossing Movies of All Time Worldwide

Robert Downey Jr. in Avengers: Endgame (2019).
Robert Downey Jr. in Avengers: Endgame (2019).
Marvel Studios

Ever since Avengers: Endgame was announced, Hollywood insiders had no doubt it would be a box office smash. But few people could have predicted just how big of a dent the movie would make in its opening weekend alone. The latest MCU movie demolished all previous box office records by making a cool $1.2 billion in just its first few days in theaters.

It's the first film in cinema history to cross the billion-dollar mark in its opening weekend, and knocked its predecessor—Avengers: Infinity War—from the top spot in terms of opening weekends by almost double (Infinity War broke records a year ago when it made $640 million worldwide during its first weekend in theaters). After grossing $2 billion in record time, and knocking James Cameron's Titanic out of the number two spot of biggest blockbusters, Avengers: Endgame has now officially unseated yet another Cameron film, Avatar—which has held the number one spot for 10 years—to become the highest-grossing movie of all time.

  1. Avengers: Endgame (2019) // $2,790,200,000

  2. Avatar (2009) // $2,789,700,000

  3. Titanic (1997) // $2,187,500,000

  4. Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) // $2,068,200,000

  5. Avengers: Infinity War (2018) // $2,048,400,000

  6. Jurassic World (2015) // $1,671,700,000

  7. Marvel's The Avengers (2012) // $1,518,800,000

  8. Furious 7 (2015) // $1,516,000,000

  9. Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) // $1,405,400,000

  10. Black Panther (2018) // $1,346,900,000

  11. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (2011) // $1,341,700,000

  12. Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) // $1,332,500,000

  13. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) // $1,309,500,000

  14. Frozen (2017) // $1,276,500,000

  15. Beauty and the Beast (2017)// $1,263,500,000

  16. Incredibles 2 (2017) // $1,242,800,000

  17. The Fate of the Furious (2017) // $1,236,000,000

  18. Iron Man 3 (2013) // $1,214,800,000

  19. Minions (2015) // $1,159,400,000

  20. Captain America: Civil War (2016) // $1,153,300,000

  1. Aquaman (2018) // $1,148,000,000

  1. Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011) // $1,123,800,000

  2. Captain Marvel (2019) // $1,120,100,000

  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) // $1,119,900,000

  2. Skyfall (2012) // $1,108,600,000

Box office totals courtesy of Box Office Mojo.

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