SeaWorld's Aquatica Orlando Becomes the World’s First Certified Autism-Friendly Water Park

iStock.com/Image Source
iStock.com/Image Source

Water parks are filled with splashing, screaming, and fast rides—all potential triggers for autistic guests prone to sensory overload. This problem is baked into the design of most water parks, but as the Orlando Sentinel reports, SeaWorld's Aquatica Orlando park in Florida is taking steps toward being more inclusive of guests across the autism spectrum. It is officially the first park of its kind to be designated a Certified Autism Center (CAC) by the International Board of Credentialling and Continuing Education Standards.

After arriving at the park, groups can plan their day using an autism-friendly guide that rates how much each ride stimulates the five senses. A water slide with lots of hills and turns ranks high on the touch scale, for example, and a colorful playground area ranks high on the sight scale.

If guests ever decide they need a break from the excitement of the day, they can retreat to a quiet zone with dimmable lights and comfortable seats. Aquatica staff members have also been trained to serve the needs of park guests with autism.

Families may be hesitant to take kids with autism to loud, overstimulating places like pools and water parks, but giving them those experiences early in life can be valuable. Between 2009 and 2011 in the U.S., accidental drowning was the cause of 90 percent of deaths for children with autism spectrum disorder under age 14. Gary Weitzen, executive director of POAC Autism Services, told Aquatics International in 2016 that "Getting them exposed to water, teaching them to swim, and showing them the proper way to act in a pool literally can be lifesaving for these children."

Aquatica Orlando is just the latest family attraction to receive the CAC stamp of approval. In April of last year, Sesame Place in Pennsylvania reopened for the season as the first-ever theme park to double as a Certified Autism Center.

[h/t Orlando Sentinel]

Vlasic Is Working on Pickle Chips Made Entirely of Pickles

iStock.com/bigacis
iStock.com/bigacis

It's easy to find pre-sliced pickle chips in a jar, but if you prefer to eat your snacks out of a bag, your pickle options are limited. Both Doritos and Lays potato chips have released products where pickles are used as flavoring and not the main ingredient. Now, the experts at Vlasic are developing bags of chips that don't just taste like pickles, but are made from real pickle slices, USA Today reports.

Vlasic's parent company Conagra Brands confirmed during a recent investor event that crunchy, snackable chips made entirely of pickles are in the works. Instead of struggling to open a jar every time you crave pickles, you'll be able to eat these chips straight from a bag. They will be vacuum-fried, making them dry and crispy like potato chips.

Vlasic hasn't revealed when the pickle chips will be released, or where they will be available to buy. But according to USA Today, Conagra co-chief operating officer Tom McGough did reveal that they "taste absolutely fantastic."

Can't wait to for Vlasic's pickle chips to arrive in your local grocery store? Here are some products that taste and smell like pickles to try in the meantime.

[h/t USA Today]

The Helvetica Font Has Been Revamped for the First Time in Decades

Monotype
Monotype

The Helvetica font family is everywhere. It’s used on everything from subway signage to federal tax forms to advertisements for a diverse group of companies, including Harley-Davidson, Oral-B, and Target. Job seekers are also likely familiar with its clean, sans-serif characters, which make it one of the best fonts for a resume.

“If it's me, [I’m using] Helvetica,” Matt Luckhurst, a graphic designer, told Bloomberg in 2015. “Helvetica is beautiful. There is only one Helvetica.”

Until now. As Wired reports, the typeface has just been revamped for the first time in decades by Monotype, which boasts the world’s largest type library and owns the rights to Helvetica. The new and improved version, called Helvetica Now, aims to better serve modern users while also working out the kinks associated with the old design.

The new Helvetica font
Monotype

While Helvetica is still ubiquitous, several major companies—including Google, Apple, IBM, and Netflix—have dropped the typeface for branding purposes in recent years. Issues related to kerning, punctuation sizes, and scrunched characters are all common gripes with the old version.

By contrast, Helvetica Now comes in three versions to suit different needs. There’s a Micro version for small screens, a Display version for larger type sizes, and a Text version that makes use of white space to offset visually “demanding” designs. Companies will need to buy the license to the new Helvetica, but the font’s creators are hopeful that everyone will be making the switch in due time.

“Helvetica Now is the tummy-tuck, facelift, and lip filler we’ve been wanting, but were too afraid to ask for,” graphic designer Abbott Miller, a partner at design consultancy Pentagram, said in a statement. “It offers beautifully drawn alternates to some of Helvetica’s most awkward moments, giving it a surprisingly, thrillingly contemporary character.”

The original Helvetica was invented in 1957 by two Swiss designers who dubbed their typeface Neue Haas Grotesk. It wasn’t until 1961 that the typeface was renamed Helvetica, and the font’s last major facelift came in 1982 with the release of the desktop-friendly Neue Helvetica.

Of course, that was pre-internet, and Monotype’s director, Charles Nix, says everyone's font needs have changed a great deal in the intervening decades. “Neue Helvetica was the first digitization of Helvetica,” Nix said. “That was a long time ago, and so much has happened in our world since then.”

[h/t Wired]

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