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How to Tell When You're in Love, According to a 1950 Instructional Video

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"You’re the only girl I’ve dated in two months. We get along fine," Jack tells Nora in defense of his love for her at the start of this 1950 instructional video from Coronet Films. As it turns out, that is not the makings of so-called "mature love."

After receiving some edgy advice from her straight-shooting mother (how did she know she loved dear old dad? "Oh I had been in love several times before. I got so I could recognize the symptoms") that "most people fall in love quite a few times in their lives," Nora knows not to rush into anything with Jack, even if he is a sight to behold on the ball diamond (sic).

The nearly-13 minute mini-drama is one of just dozens of such shorts produced by Coronet between 1946 and the early 1970s. The range of instruction runs the gamut from educational ("Introduction to Foreign Trade") to self-help ("Improve Your Personality") to moralistic ("Fun of Being Thoughtful") to whatever "Are You Popular?" is.

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A Brief History of Time
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You may have heard that time is a social construct, but that doesn’t stop it from having consequences in the real world. If you show up to a party 10 minutes before it’s scheduled to start, you’ll likely be the first one there, and if you arrive to an interview 10 minutes late, you likely won’t get the job. But how did humanity agree on when and how to observe certain times of day?

In their new video, the It’s Okay to Be Smart team explains how humans “invented” the modern concept of time. The increments we use to measure time, like seconds, minutes, and hours, come from the ancient civilizations of the Egyptians and the Babylonians. Early clocks, like sundials and water clocks, were pretty crude, so people couldn’t pinpoint a time like noon down to the second even if they wanted to. But as clocks became more accurate, the problem wasn’t being unable to tell time accurately, but deciding which clocks qualified as “accurate” in the first place.

In 1884, President Chester A. Arthur organized the International Meridian Conference with the intention of deciding on a uniform definition of time to be followed around the world. The attendees ended up choosing the meridian running through Greenwich, England as the official Prime Meridian, and all clocks would be measured against the clock in the town’s observatory. Greenwich Mean Time is still used as the standard world time today.

Check out the full story below.

[h/t It’s Okay to Be Smart]

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Melissa Huang's Adorable Animal Macarons
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Canadian baker Melissa Huang is inspired by all things adorable. Her macarons take up to six hours to make and come in a range of cute designs: There are sheep, pandas, chickens, and more. See more of Huang's cute creations on Instagram

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