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Jamie McKelvie/Matthew Wilson/Image Comics
Jamie McKelvie/Matthew Wilson/Image Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Jamie McKelvie/Matthew Wilson/Image Comics
Jamie McKelvie/Matthew Wilson/Image Comics

Every Wednesday, I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, Kickstarter, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. witzend

By Wally Wood and others
Fantagraphics

A pricey, high-end hardcover collection of Wally Wood's famed underground magazine. 

In 1966, about 10 years after the advent of the Comics Code and right around the time of the ascendance of Marvel Comics and the “Silver Age” of superheroes, Wally Wood became fed up with the industry. Looking for an outlet where he and his friends could create original comics for adult readers, he decided to self-publish an anthology magazine he called witzend. Wood was one of the great comics artists of the mid-20th century, known for his work on Mad Magazine, but he was not a great businessman. After taking pre-orders for an eight-issue subscription, he ran through all the money before the 4th issue even came out and decided that this wasn't for him. He ended up selling the whole publication to co-publisher Bill Pearson for one dollar. Pearson kept witzend going for a sporadic 13 issues before putting it to rest in 1985, four years after Wood committed suicide.

This week, Fantagraphics is releasing a giant, $125 hardcover box set collecting all 13 witzend issues with forewords by Bill Pearson and historian Patrick Rosenkranz. witzend is something most comic fans have heard about but haven't been able to read for themselves until now. Wood enlisted some of the best writers and artists of the era to create comics, pinups, and prose, free from editorial constraints. There are contributions from the likes of Al Williamson, Steve Ditko, Gray Morrow, Jeffrey Catherine Jones, Howard Chaykin, Harvey Kurtzman, Art Spiegelman, Mike Zeck, Frank Frazetta, and more.

The nature of the stories tend to be adult science fiction and fantasy, similar to what would make its way into magazines put out by Warren Publishing in the 1970s. For the most part, they are not exactly groundbreaking achievements in storytelling, but the publication itself was ahead of its time as an outlet for comics' greatest talents to create without having to answer to anyone but themselves. Two of the most well-known and lasting contributions to the magazine were Wood’s own The Wizard King, an illustrated, serialized prose novel in the making and Steve Ditko’s objectionist crimefighter Mr. A, a precursor to his later creation for Charlton Comics, The Question.

Here’s more information and some preview pages.

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2. The Hole The Fox Did Make

By Emily Carroll
emcarroll.com

A young girl seeks the truth in a shallow creek in the woods 

A new webcomic from Emily Carroll is always an event. As we await the first ever print collection of her work (Through The Woods, due out from Simon & Schuster next month) she has whet our appetite this past week with “The Hole The Fox Did Make," a brand new eerie tale about foxes, dreams, missing girls, and shallow creeks.

Regan is a young girl who finds herself dreaming about foxes and tall men and is mysteriously drawn to a nearby creek where she uncovers secrets about her mother and the father she never knew.

This is a somewhat more understated comic than some of her past strips where she’s used animated gifs and long pages. Here she works in a horizontal strip format in simple black and white until, to great effect, she breaks free. Her work is mysterious, elliptical, and so effortlessly creepy that it makes most other horror comics seem like they’re trying too hard. Carroll is a modern day Edward Gorey in that her beautiful art pulls you in and then sets you up for a disturbing payoff.

Go read "The Hole The Fox Did Make” here.

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3. The Wicked + The Divine

Written by Kieron Gillen; art by Jamie McKelvie; colors by Matthew Wilson
Image Comics

Twelve gods are reincarnated every ninety years as humans on Earth where they are loved and hated. Two years after that, they are dead.

When Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson decided to end their run on Marvel’s Young Avengers (which I thought it was one of the best comics of 2013), the publisher made the unprecedented move of just ending the book rather than continuing with a new creative team. That is a strong testament to their appeal and the unique voice they brought to that comic. Now, the three creatives are launching The Wicked + The Divine, a new, ongoing, creator-owned series.

Back in 2006, Gillen and McKelvie broke onto the scene with Phonogram, a mini-series that used magic as a device to explore the effect music – specifically '90s Brit Pop – has on its listeners. This time, in The Wicked + The Divine, they look at the people who make the music and the seemingly devilish witchcraft they use to entrance their fans. The series follows a group of gods who reincarnate as humans every ninety years and become celebrities that are adored and loathed. The first issue begins in the 1920s before jumping to present day where we meet three of the gods/pop stars: a teen ingenue dressed like ‘70s era Dazzler, a cross between David Bowie and Annie Lennox who claims to be Lucifer, and a Rihanna lookalike who acts like a cat.

McKelvie and colorist Matthew Wilson create slick, glossy, hyper-real comics. See for yourself in the imagery from the comic’s own dedicated Tumblr.

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4. Photobooth: A Biography

By Meags Fitzgerald
Conundrum Press

Everything you've ever wanted to know about photobooths.

The photobooth, once a staple of amusement parks, bus stations, bars, and arcades, has lost its place in today’s world of constant selfie-taking. The ones you still see usually print digital photos rather than the old-fashioned kind that used chemicals. Digital photobooths are cleaner, cheaper, and chemical-free, but like many things today, they lack in quality and archival longevity.

Meags Fitzgerald is among a dwindling group of chemical photobooth fans who are desperate to keep these machines from disappearing. To chronicle their history and culture, she has written and illustrated Photobooth: A Biography, a dense and wordy graphic novel that is part well-researched history and part journal of personal obsession.

This is Fitzgerald’s first book, and while it may be considered more illustrated prose than sequential art, the drawings themselves exhibit a pleasing range of styles from quaint and outsiderish to realistic pencil renderings.

Read more about the book at its official website, www.photoboothabiography.com

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DC Comics, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
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entertainment
The Dark Knight Is Returning to Theaters, Just Ahead of 10th Anniversary
DC Comics, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
DC Comics, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Believe it or not, July 18 will mark the 10th anniversary of the release of The Dark Knight, the second entry in Christopher Nolan’s game-changing superhero movie trilogy. To mark the occasion, Showcase Cinemas—the movie theater chain behind the Cinema de Lux experience—is bringing the movie back to select theaters on the east coast for limited screenings on February 8 and February 11, /Film reports.

Many people consider The Dark Knight the best film in the Batman franchise (Tim Burton and LEGO-fied movies included). The film currently holds a 94 percent “fresh” rating with both critics and audiences on Rotten Tomatoes, making it the highest-rated movie in the Batman universe.

Much of the film’s acclaim came from Heath Ledger’s brilliant turn as The Joker—a role that won him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar (making him the only actor to win that award posthumously). Even Michael Caine, who plays Bruce Wayne’s ever-dutiful butler and BFF Alfred, admitted that he wasn’t sold on the idea of bringing The Joker back into Batman’s cinematic universe, after the character was so ably played by Jack Nicholson in Burton’s 1989 film, until he found out Ledger would be taking the role.

“You don’t try and top Jack,” was Caine’s original thought. But when Nolan informed the actor that he was casting Ledger, that changed things. “I thought: ‘Now that’s the one guy that could do it!’ My confidence came back,” Caine told Empire Magazine.

To find out if The Dark Knight is playing at a theater near you, visit Showcase Cinemas’s website. If it’s not, don’t despair: With the official anniversary still six months away, other theaters are bound to have the same idea.

[h/t: /Film]

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BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
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Comics
10 Amazing Facts About Stan Lee
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Comic book legend Stan Lee’s life has always been an open book. The co-creator of some of the greatest superheroes and most beloved stories of all time has become just as mythical and larger-than-life as the characters in the panels. In 2015, around the time of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, Lee had the idea to reflect on his own life, as he said, “in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comic book … or if you prefer, a graphic memoir.”

The result, published by the Touchstone imprint of Simon & Schuster in 2015, was Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir—which was written by Lee with Peter David and features artwork by cartoonist and illustrator Colleen Doran. Here are 10 things we learned about Lee, on his 95th birthday.

1. HIS WIFE IS ALSO HIS BARBER.

As a bit of a throwaway fact, Stanley Martin Lieber (Stan Lee) reveals the secret of his slicked back mane on the second page of his memoir. “My whole adult life, I’ve never been to a barber,” he writes. “Joanie always cuts my hair.”

2. HIS CONFIDENCE COMES FROM HIS MOTHER.

Amazing Fantastic IncredibleCourtesy POW! Entertainment[2].jpg

Stan Lee writes that as a child he loved to read books by Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and others, and his mother often watched him read. “I probably got my self-confidence from the fact that my mother thought everything I did was brilliant.”

3. YOUNG STAN LEE WROTE OBITUARIES.

Before writing about the fantastic lives of fictional characters, Stan Lee wrote antemortem obituaries for celebrities at an undisclosed news office in New York. He says that he eventually quit that job because it was too “depressing.”

4. CAPTAIN AMERICA WAS HIS FIRST BIG BREAK.

A week into his job at Timely Comics, Lee got the opportunity to write a two-page Captain America comic. He wrote it under the pen name Stan Lee (now his legal name) and titled it "Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge." His first full comic script would come in Captain America Issue 5, published August 1, 1941.

5. HE WROTE TRAINING FILMS FOR THE ARMY WITH DR. SEUSS.

After being transferred from the army’s Signal Corps in New Jersey, Lee worked as a playwright in the Training Film Division in Queens with eight other men, including a few who went on to be very famous: Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Saroyan, cartoonist Charles Addams (creator of The Addams Family), director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington [1939] and It’s a Wonderful Life [1946]) and Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

6. HE DEFIED THE COMICS CODE AUTHORITY WITH AN ANTI-DRUG COMIC.

In 1971, Lee received a letter from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare asking him to put an anti-drug message in one of his books. He came up with a Spider-Man story that involved his best friend Harry abusing pills because of a break-up. The CCA would not approve the story with their seal because of the mention of drugs, but Lee convinced his publisher, Martin Goodman, to run the comic anyway.

7. AN ISSUE AT THE PRINTERS TURNED THE HULK GREEN.

The character was supposed to be gray, but Lee writes that the printer had a hard time keeping the color consistent. “So as of issue #2,” Lee writes, “with no explanation, he turned green.”

8. HIS WIFE DESTROYED HIS PRIZED TYPEWRITER.


Rich Polk/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly

According to Lee, during an argument, Joanie destroyed the typewriter he used to write the first issues for characters including Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four. “This happened before eBay," he writes. "Too bad. I could’ve auctioned the parts and made a mint.”

9. A FIRE DESTROYED HIS INTERVIEWS AND LECTURES.

When Lee moved his family to Los Angeles, he set up a studio in Van Nuys where he stored videotapes of his talks and interviews, along with a commissioned bust of his wife. The building was lost to a blaze that the fire department believed was arson, but no one was ever charged with the crime.

10. HIS FAVORITE MARVEL FILM CAMEO WAS BASED ON ONE FROM THE COMICS.

Beginning with the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Stan Lee has made quick cameos in Marvel films as a service to the fans. He says that his appearance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) was inspired by the story of Reed and Sue Richards’ wedding in Fantastic Four Annual Volume 1 #3, in which he and artist/writer Jack Kirby attempt to crash the ceremony but are thwarted.

All images courtesy of Touchstone unless otherwise noted.

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