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Jamie McKelvie/Matthew Wilson/Image Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

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Jamie McKelvie/Matthew Wilson/Image Comics

Every Wednesday, I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, Kickstarter, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. witzend

By Wally Wood and others
Fantagraphics

A pricey, high-end hardcover collection of Wally Wood's famed underground magazine. 

In 1966, about 10 years after the advent of the Comics Code and right around the time of the ascendance of Marvel Comics and the “Silver Age” of superheroes, Wally Wood became fed up with the industry. Looking for an outlet where he and his friends could create original comics for adult readers, he decided to self-publish an anthology magazine he called witzend. Wood was one of the great comics artists of the mid-20th century, known for his work on Mad Magazine, but he was not a great businessman. After taking pre-orders for an eight-issue subscription, he ran through all the money before the 4th issue even came out and decided that this wasn't for him. He ended up selling the whole publication to co-publisher Bill Pearson for one dollar. Pearson kept witzend going for a sporadic 13 issues before putting it to rest in 1985, four years after Wood committed suicide.

This week, Fantagraphics is releasing a giant, $125 hardcover box set collecting all 13 witzend issues with forewords by Bill Pearson and historian Patrick Rosenkranz. witzend is something most comic fans have heard about but haven't been able to read for themselves until now. Wood enlisted some of the best writers and artists of the era to create comics, pinups, and prose, free from editorial constraints. There are contributions from the likes of Al Williamson, Steve Ditko, Gray Morrow, Jeffrey Catherine Jones, Howard Chaykin, Harvey Kurtzman, Art Spiegelman, Mike Zeck, Frank Frazetta, and more.

The nature of the stories tend to be adult science fiction and fantasy, similar to what would make its way into magazines put out by Warren Publishing in the 1970s. For the most part, they are not exactly groundbreaking achievements in storytelling, but the publication itself was ahead of its time as an outlet for comics' greatest talents to create without having to answer to anyone but themselves. Two of the most well-known and lasting contributions to the magazine were Wood’s own The Wizard King, an illustrated, serialized prose novel in the making and Steve Ditko’s objectionist crimefighter Mr. A, a precursor to his later creation for Charlton Comics, The Question.

Here’s more information and some preview pages.

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2. The Hole The Fox Did Make

By Emily Carroll
emcarroll.com

A young girl seeks the truth in a shallow creek in the woods 

A new webcomic from Emily Carroll is always an event. As we await the first ever print collection of her work (Through The Woods, due out from Simon & Schuster next month) she has whet our appetite this past week with “The Hole The Fox Did Make," a brand new eerie tale about foxes, dreams, missing girls, and shallow creeks.

Regan is a young girl who finds herself dreaming about foxes and tall men and is mysteriously drawn to a nearby creek where she uncovers secrets about her mother and the father she never knew.

This is a somewhat more understated comic than some of her past strips where she’s used animated gifs and long pages. Here she works in a horizontal strip format in simple black and white until, to great effect, she breaks free. Her work is mysterious, elliptical, and so effortlessly creepy that it makes most other horror comics seem like they’re trying too hard. Carroll is a modern day Edward Gorey in that her beautiful art pulls you in and then sets you up for a disturbing payoff.

Go read "The Hole The Fox Did Make” here.

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3. The Wicked + The Divine

Written by Kieron Gillen; art by Jamie McKelvie; colors by Matthew Wilson
Image Comics

Twelve gods are reincarnated every ninety years as humans on Earth where they are loved and hated. Two years after that, they are dead.

When Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson decided to end their run on Marvel’s Young Avengers (which I thought it was one of the best comics of 2013), the publisher made the unprecedented move of just ending the book rather than continuing with a new creative team. That is a strong testament to their appeal and the unique voice they brought to that comic. Now, the three creatives are launching The Wicked + The Divine, a new, ongoing, creator-owned series.

Back in 2006, Gillen and McKelvie broke onto the scene with Phonogram, a mini-series that used magic as a device to explore the effect music – specifically '90s Brit Pop – has on its listeners. This time, in The Wicked + The Divine, they look at the people who make the music and the seemingly devilish witchcraft they use to entrance their fans. The series follows a group of gods who reincarnate as humans every ninety years and become celebrities that are adored and loathed. The first issue begins in the 1920s before jumping to present day where we meet three of the gods/pop stars: a teen ingenue dressed like ‘70s era Dazzler, a cross between David Bowie and Annie Lennox who claims to be Lucifer, and a Rihanna lookalike who acts like a cat.

McKelvie and colorist Matthew Wilson create slick, glossy, hyper-real comics. See for yourself in the imagery from the comic’s own dedicated Tumblr.

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4. Photobooth: A Biography

By Meags Fitzgerald
Conundrum Press

Everything you've ever wanted to know about photobooths.

The photobooth, once a staple of amusement parks, bus stations, bars, and arcades, has lost its place in today’s world of constant selfie-taking. The ones you still see usually print digital photos rather than the old-fashioned kind that used chemicals. Digital photobooths are cleaner, cheaper, and chemical-free, but like many things today, they lack in quality and archival longevity.

Meags Fitzgerald is among a dwindling group of chemical photobooth fans who are desperate to keep these machines from disappearing. To chronicle their history and culture, she has written and illustrated Photobooth: A Biography, a dense and wordy graphic novel that is part well-researched history and part journal of personal obsession.

This is Fitzgerald’s first book, and while it may be considered more illustrated prose than sequential art, the drawings themselves exhibit a pleasing range of styles from quaint and outsiderish to realistic pencil renderings.

Read more about the book at its official website, www.photoboothabiography.com

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iStock
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Pop Culture
5 Bizarre Comic-Con News Stories from Years Past
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iStock

At its best, Comic-Con is a friendly place where like-minded people can celebrate their pop culture obsessions, and each other. And no one can make fun of you, no matter how lazy your cosplaying might be. You might think that at its worst, it’s just a series of long lines of costumed fans and small stores crammed into a convention center. But sometimes, throwing together 100,000-plus people from around the world in what feels like a carnival-type atmosphere where anything goes can have less than stellar results. Here are some highlights from past Comic-Con-tastrophes.

1. MAN IN HARRY POTTER T-SHIRT STABS ANOTHER MAN IN THE FACE—WITH A PEN

In 2010, two men waiting for a Comic-Con screening of the Seth Rogen alien comedy Paul got into a very adult argument about whether one of them was sitting too close to the other. Unable to come to a satisfactory conclusion with words, one man stabbed the other in the face with a pen. According to CNN, the attacker was led away wearing handcuffs and a Harry Potter T-shirt. In the aftermath, some Comic-Con attendees dealt with the attack in an oddly fitting way: They cosplayed as the victim, with pens protruding from bloody eye sockets.

2. MEMORABILIA THIEVES INVADE NEW YORK

Since its founding in 2006, New York Comic Con has attracted a few sticky-fingered attendees. In 2010, a man stole several rare comics from vendor Matt Nelson, co-founder of Texas’ Worldwide Comics. Just one of those, Whiz Comics No. 1, was worth $11,000, according to the New York Post. A few years later, in 2014, someone stole a $2000 “Dunny” action figure, which artist Jon-Paul Kaiser had painted during the event for Clutter magazine. And those are just the incidents that involved police; lower-scale cases of toys and comics disappearing from booths are an increasingly frustrating epidemic, according to some. “Comic Con theft is an issue we all sort of ignore,” collector Tracy Isenhour wrote on the blog of his company, Needless Essentials, in 2015. “I am here to tell you no more. It’s time for this garbage to stop."

3. CATWOMAN SAVES THE DAY

John Sciulli/Getty Images for Xbox

Adrianne Curry, winner of the first cycle of America’s Next Top Model, has made a career of chasing viral fame. Ironically, it was at Comic-Con in 2014 that Curry did something truly worthy of attention—though there wasn’t a camera in sight. Dressed as Catwoman, she was posing with fans alongside her friend Alicia Marie, who was dressed as Tigra. According to a Facebook post Marie wrote at the time, a fan tried to shove his hands into her bikini bottoms. She screamed, the man ran off, and Curry jumped to action. She “literally took off after dude WITH her Catwoman whip and chased him down, beat his a**,” Marie wrote. “Punched him across the face with the butt of her whip—he had zombie blood on his face—got on her costume.”

4. MAN POSES AS FUGITIVE-SEEKING INVESTIGATOR TO GET INTO VIP ROOM

The lines at Comic-Con are legendary, so one Utah man came up with a novel way to try and skip them altogether. In 2015, Jonathon M. Wall tried to get into Salt Lake Comic Con’s exclusive VIP enclave (normally a $10,000 ticket) by claiming he was an agent with the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, and needed to get into the VIP room “to catch a fugitive,” according to The San Diego Union Tribune. Not only does that story not even come close to making sense, it also adds up to impersonating a federal agent, a crime to which Wall pleaded guilty in April of this year and which carried a sentence of up to three years in prison and a $250,000 fine. In June, prosecutors announced that they were planning to reduce his crime from a felony to a misdemeanor.

5. MAN WALKS 645 MILES TO COMIC-CON, DRESSED AS A STORMTROOPER, TO HONOR HIS LATE WIFE

Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Disney

In 2015, Kevin Doyle walked 645 miles along the California coast to honor his late wife, Eileen. Doyle had met Eileen relatively late in life, when he was in his 50s, and they bonded over their shared love of Star Wars (he even proposed to her while dressed as Darth Vader). However, she died of cancer barely a year after they were married. Adrift and lonely, Doyle decided to honor her memory and their love of Star Wars by walking to Comic-Con—from San Francisco. “I feel like I’m so much better in the healing process than if I’d stayed home,” he told The San Diego Union Tribune.

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Funko
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Pop Culture
Funko Is Bringing a Ton of Old-School Hanna-Barbera Characters to Comic-Con
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Funko

Long before The Simpsons or SpongeBob SquarePants dominated the airwaves, classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons like Wacky Races, Scooby-Doo, and The Huckleberry Hound Show reigned supreme. Now, some of the American animation studio’s most nostalgic characters are getting the Funko treatment.

As Nerdist reports, the toy manufacturer is launching a pop-up store at Comic-Con International, which runs this year from July 20 through July 23 at the San Diego Convention Center. The Get Animated! Pop!-Up Shop will sell exclusive models of Hanna-Barbera characters that fans can't purchase anywhere else.

For Wacky Races aficionados, there's a Big Gruesome model, two Rufus Ruffcut figurines (both of which come with a tiny Sawtooth), and two Peter Perfect models, one of which includes the notoriously rickety Turbo Terrific drag racer.

A Funko figurine of Big Gruesome from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon
Funko

A Funko figurine of Rufus Ruffcut from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

A Funko figurine of Rufus Ruffcut from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

A Funko figurine of Peter Perfect from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

Scooby-Doo comes in three colors, including green, pink, and blue.

A Funko figurine of a green Scooby-Doo.
Funko

A Funko figurine of a pink Scooby-Doo.
Funko

A Funko figurine of a blue Scooby-Doo.
Funko

Funko also pays tribute to The Jetsons and Huckleberry Hound, with the beloved blue dog getting his own Pop! Animation eight-pack (each dog has a different outfit) and Rosie the Robot getting her own Pop! Animation three-pack.

A “Huckleberry Hound” Funko Pop! Animation 8-pack
Funko

“The Jetsons” Funko Pop! Animation 8-pack of Rosie the Robot
Funko

You can view the full round-up over at Nerdist, or by visiting Funko's blog.

[h/t Nerdist]

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