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robin antar
robin antar

Hyperrealistic Sculptures of Everyday Objects

robin antar
robin antar

Robin Antar is a Brooklyn artist who creates oversized replicas of American staples out of stone. Despite being made out of marble and other inedible materials, her statues looks good enough to eat! Antar's creations are currently being displayed at The Waterfall Gallery & Mansion in NYC, June 12 through August 31, 2014. 

"My passion for sculpting is expressed in my creation of the virtual records of contemporary culture," Antar said in a press release. "I capture everyday objects in carved stone, using a technique I invented more than 20 years ago."

Antar starts with a similar color of stone or simply dyes it herself. Due to being blind in one eye, she keeps the model close at hand instead of using a photo. She then spends countless hours carving, chiseling, sanding, and mounting to create huge replicas of food and clothing. For some pieces, she adds other materials like string to add to the effect. The result is a plethora of realistic statues that make you look twice before you realize they're made of stone (and huge!).

Antar wasn't always interested in pop art. Although she has been sculpting since high school, her work was largely abstract. It wasn't until she helped a student finish their project that she became intrigued with realism. She was commissioned to create a Nike shoe and then eventually carved an entire set of footwear.

After 9/11, Antar wanted to celebrate American culture and decided on the most American thing she could think of: junk food. The artist went on to create a whole collection of condiments, cookies, and candy. She also created other American symbols like a jean jacket and boxing gloves. 

"I’ve achieved my goal when the U.S. government writes to tell me I cannot copyright a work of art because it too closely resembles the product that I chose to record in stone," she wrote. "The day I received that letter was one of the happiest days of my life."

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The Getty Center, Surrounded By Wildfires, Will Leave Its Art Where It Is
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The wildfires sweeping through California have left countless homeowners and businesses scrambling as the blazes continue to grow out of control in various locations throughout the state. While art lovers worried when they heard that Los Angeles's Getty Center would be closing its doors this week, as the fires closed part of the 405 Freeway, there was a bit of good news. According to museum officials, the priceless works housed inside the famed Getty Center are said to be perfectly secure and won't need to be evacuated from the facility.

“The safest place for the art is right here at the Getty,” Ron Hartwig, the Getty’s vice president of communications, told the Los Angeles Times. According to its website, the museum was closed on December 5 and December 6 “to protect the collections from smoke from fires in the region,” but as of now, the art inside is staying put.

Though every museum has its own way of protecting the priceless works inside it, the Los Angeles Times notes that the Getty Center was constructed in such a way as to protect its contents from the very kind of emergency it's currently facing. The air throughout the gallery is filtered by a system that forces it out, rather than a filtration method which would bring air in. This system will keep the smoke and air pollutants from getting into the facility, and by closing the museum this week, the Getty is preventing the harmful air from entering the building through any open doors.

There is also a water tank at the facility that holds 1 million gallons in reserve for just such an occasion, and any brush on the property is routinely cleared away to prevent the likelihood of a fire spreading. The Getty Villa, a separate campus located in the Pacific Palisades off the Pacific Coast Highway, was also closed out of concern for air quality this week.

The museum is currently working with the police and fire departments in the area to determine the need for future closures and the evacuation of any personnel. So far, the fires have claimed more than 83,000 acres of land, leading to the evacuation of thousands of people and the temporary closure of I-405, which runs right alongside the Getty near Los Angeles’s Bel-Air neighborhood.

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This 77-Year-Old Artist Saves Money on Art Supplies by 'Painting' in Microsoft Excel
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It takes a lot of creativity to turn a blank canvas into an inspired work of art. Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi makes his pictures out of something that’s even more dull than a white page: an empty spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel.

When he retired, the 77-year-old Horiuchi, whose work was recently spotlighted by Great Big Story, decided he wanted to get into art. At the time, he was hesitant to spend money on painting supplies or even computer software, though, so he began experimenting with one of the programs that was already at his disposal.

Horiuchi's unique “painting” method shows that in the right hands, Excel’s graph-building features can be used to bring colorful landscapes to life. The tranquil ponds, dense forests, and blossoming flowers in his art are made by drawing shapes with the software's line tool, then adding shading with the bucket tool.

Since picking up the hobby in the 2000s, Horiuchi has been awarded multiple prizes for his creative work with Excel. Let that be inspiration for Microsoft loyalists who are still broken up about the death of Paint.

You can get a behind-the-scenes look at the artist's process in the video below.

[h/t Great Big Story]

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