More Than 120,000 DeWALT Drills Recalled Due to Shock Hazard

The image shows a similar model of drill, but the ones affected by the recall have cords.
The image shows a similar model of drill, but the ones affected by the recall have cords.
Bidvine, Pexels

If you have a yellow-and-black DeWALT drill in your closet or tool shed, you may want to double check the model. The Maryland-based power tool company has recalled about 122,000 drills because people could get shocked while using them, according to The Atlanta-Journal Constitution.

If you’re not sure which model you own, check the label on the right side of the drill. The affected models are two types of 3/8-inch VSR drills that have a power cable on one end. They include the DWD110 (UPC 885911037518) and the DWD112 (UPC 885911057319).

Drills that are subject to the recall also have a date code of 2017-37-FY through 2018-22-FY, which can be found below the label, etched into the drill. However, if yours has an X after the date code, it’s safe to use because it has been inspected, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

If you own one of these models, stop using it immediately and contact DeWALT for a free inspection and repair. The wiring inside these drills could possibly come in contact with some of its internal moving parts, creating an electric shock. No injuries have been reported yet, though.

DeWALT announced the recall on January 10, but some consumers might not have learned about the issue until this week, when the CPSC posted its recall alert. The delay was due to the government shutdown, according to the CPSC.

[h/t The Atlanta-Journal Constitution]

21 Widespread Myths About Animals, Debunked

YouTube
YouTube

No, that nasty-looking wart on your finger didn't come from a toad. And yes, giraffes really do need more than 30 minutes of shut-eye in a day. Chances are that one of the "facts" you've come to know about your favorite animal isn't a fact at all. (Cats can swim and dogs do see colors—though in a different way than you probably do.)

Since our fuzzy, furry, finned, and winged friends can't always speak for themselves, Mental Floss Editor-in-Chief Erin McCarthy is here to clear up 21 widespread animal myths. So gather up your pets and check out this week's all-new edition of the Mental Floss List Show. You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

Australian Accounting Firm Offers Employees 12 Weeks of ‘Life Leave’ to Strike the Perfect Work-Life Balance

iStock.com/karenfoleyphotography
iStock.com/karenfoleyphotography

What would you do if you could take a three-month vacation each year? Would you book a flight to Hawaii, catch up on your favorite Netflix shows, or simply spend some quality time with your partner, kids, or dogs? The employees at one Australian accounting firm undoubtedly have a few ideas about how to spend the six to 12 weeks of “life leave” they will soon be granted.

As Travel + Leisure reports, Ernst & Young Oceania decided to introduce more flexible work hours in an attempt to attract and retain top talent. “We’re innovating so we don’t lose these people while they pursue passions outside of work,” company official Kate Hillman told The Independent. Hillman went on to cite volunteer experiences, training programs, and even a trekking trip to Nepal as different ways that employees might take advantage of the new policy, which goes into effect April 1.

Employees can either use their leave all at once or split it into two smaller vacations. The only catch is that the leave is self-funded—so it’s essentially an unpaid vacation. Still, if someone has the burning desire to backpack through Europe for a couple of months, or work on a project, it’s a safer option than quitting their job only to return unemployed and broke.

In addition to this policy, employees can choose to reduce their hours to a part-time schedule for up to three months each year. Parents may also choose to take advantage of a term-time arrangement, which lets them work regular hours when school is in session, then take time off during school holidays.

According to the firm’s research, flexibility at work boosts employee engagement by 11 percent. There are plenty of other reasons to take a vacation, too—not the least of which is evidence that time off may help you lead a longer, healthier, and happier life. Plus, you’ll come back refreshed and motivated, so your boss will be happy, too.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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