Robert Downey Jr. Improvised One of Iron Man's Most Memorable Lines

© 2018 - Marvel Studios
© 2018 - Marvel Studios

Robert Downey Jr. always believed he was the perfect person to play the role of Tony Stark/Iron Man—the star of the first Marvel Cinematic Universe film—but as we learned later on, he was in the minority. Due to his longtime struggle with drugs and alcohol and brushes with the law, Downey was considered a risky pick for the role and the studio wasn't willing to roll the dice on him. Ultimately, it was Iron Man director Jon Favreau who was able to sway the studio to his way of thinking—which is fortunate, because it's impossible to imagine the MCU without Downey today.

It turns out that had another actor been cast, one of Iron Man’s most iconic lines would have been completely different, too, as it was improvised by Downey during production.

MCU fans will never forget the final scene of the first Iron Man movie, as it perfectly caps off the film and sets us up for Iron Man’s future. “I am Iron Man,” Tony Stark states at a press conference, admitting his superhero identity to the world.

The line became so iconic that it appeared again at the end of Iron Man 3. And Downey’s improvisation actually turned out to have a wider impact on Marvel Studios as a whole.

"That success inspired us to go further in trusting ourselves to find the balance of staying true to the comics and the spirit of the comics but not being afraid to adapt and evolve and to change things," Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige told Deadline in 2018.

In the comic books, it takes several years for Stark to confirm his alter ego to the public.

“It’s a fine line,” Feige continued. “Tony Stark not reading off the card and not sticking with the fixed story? Him just blurting out ‘I am Iron Man?’ That seems very much in keeping with who that character is. It just hadn’t been done in the comics before, but it was something very much in keeping with the comics’ character and what he could have done.”

More than 10 years after the release of the original Iron Man, Feige remains the architect of the MCU, and therefore one of its key decision-makers.

“I think it did inspire us on all the movies," Feige continued. "What I love now—20 movies in—is how fans expect the MCU to change and adapt. They expect us to be inspired by the comics as opposed to being slavishly devoted to them."

Fans will see Downey don his Iron Man suit once more when Avengers: Endgame hits theaters on April 26, 2019.

Peter Dinklage Can't Say Benevolent in This Game of Thrones Blooper Reel

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

There are many adjectives one might use to describe HBO's Game of Thrones. While hilarious isn't usually one of them (though the series certainly has its moments of levity), that's the best way to describe the Game of Thrones blooper reel below, in which some of your favorite throne-seekers momentarily break character—and Peter Dinklage has a problem pronouncing the word benevolent. (Warning: profanity ahead!)

Ralph Fiennes Almost Turned Down Voldemort Role in Harry Potter Movies

WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.
WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.

Ralph Fiennes has earned Oscar nominations for Schindler's List and The English Patient, but his best-known role might be his performance as He Who Must Not Be Named, otherwise known as Voldemort, in the Harry Potter film series. While the movies introduced Fiennes and his work to a new generation of moviegoers, he recently revealed that he almost said no to the project altogether.

We first saw Fiennes as Voldemort in the fourth film in the series, 2005's Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and he continued to play the Dark Lord of the Harry Potter universe until the series' conclusion in 2011.

Though fans would argue that it was the role Fiennes was born to play, saying "yes" was not an immediate decision for the celebrated actor.

"The truth is I was actually ignorant about the films and the books," the actor recently admitted while appearing on The Jonathan Ross Show when asked about his relationship to the Potterverse prior to taking on the role. "I was approached by the production. Mike Newell was directing the film that they wanted me to be in ... the first time Voldemort was going to appear physically."

"Out of ignorance I just sort of thought, this isn’t for me," Fiennes continued. "Quite stupidly I resisted, I was hesitant. I think the clincher was that my sister Martha—who has three children who were then probably about 12, 10, and 8—said, 'What do you mean? You’ve got to do it!' So then I rewound my thinking."

Potterheads everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to Fiennes's sister—and her kids.

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