9 Delightful Recipes From the 1950s You Should Make with Your Kids Today

Getty Images
Getty Images

Have you ever been accused of gulping down a meal so fast you were consuming your food "like it was going out of style"? Well, keep gulping, because food does go out of style.

But let's not overlook the dishes of decades past, because they offer some delightful lessons. In 1957, for instance, Betty Crocker's Cook Book for Boys and Girls used easy instructions and bright, beautiful images to teach children how to cook. These recipes are just as fun to make today as they were then — even if they are out of style.

(For a larger view of each recipe, click directly on the image.)

1. Branded pancakes


Granted, names have gotten a lot longer since John and Jane dominated the pancake scene. But a hungry enough birthday girl will still enjoy a batch of Alexandria pancakes branded in her honor.

2. Eggs in a frame


This is listed under the "Campfire" section of the book, but it looks like it can be done anywhere butter is abundant.

3. Doughboys


More campfire ingenuity; simple enough for any little camper who can be trusted with a pointy stick.

4. Raggedy Ann salad


Here is an example of making do with what would be commonly available year round to a child in 1957. Granted, by our standards, Mrs. Crocker is using the word "salad" pretty liberally here. But remember, the whole point of Raggedy Ann is that she was a lovable, patched-together hodgepodge of a doll. Or a salad!

5. American pizza


It's important to include the word "American" in the title, because no matter how good this turns out, it's going to disillusion a child forever that they can make "real" pizza at home. But it's still fun! Like little Peter tells us at the bottom of the page, "Pizza cuts up real easy if you use the kitchen scissors."

6. Kabobs


This dish is perfect for the child who enjoys sharp sticks, knives, and fire. Which is most of them.

7. Three men in a boat


Okay, not every recipe is going to translate well over the years. And not every modern child will be thrilled with a mixture of creamed dried beef, potato skin, mushrooms, and cheese. But hey! It's a boat you can eat! That's pretty cool.

8. Drum cake


I must admit, falling in love with this photo was the whole reason I spent a week on the phone getting General Mills' permission to use it. Candy canes! When it's not even Christmas! Brilliant!

9. Eskimo igloo cake


Remember, in 1957 it would have occurred to no one to ask whether it was socially acceptable to make food versions of an indigenous people's home, nor would they have searched their brains trying to remember if it's rude to say "Eskimo." Today this little cake can be used as a great introduction to anthropology, history, and America's changing social values. Or you can just eat it.

**All images used with express permission of General Mills**

Mayochup Is Now an Official Condiment

Heinz
Heinz

Like it or not, Heinz Mayochup is on its way to a store near you. As Us Weekly reports, bottles of the blended sauce—made from mayonnaise and ketchup, naturally—will be available for purchase later this month.

Heinz's announcement of the condiment back in April was met with mixed reactions. Many were thrilled. Others repulsed. And people from Utah were pretty miffed that Heinz took credit for their beloved "fry sauce," a condiment that was reportedly invented by a local restaurant chain in 1948. (In addition to fries, the ketchup and mayo combo pairs well with burgers and can be used to make a variety of dips.)

Mayonnaise haters (we're looking at you, Millennials) may find Mayochup less than appealing, but at least it's better than Heinz's green ketchup, right? Mayochup also seems to be doing well in the United Arab Emirates—the only country where it's currently being sold. In April, Heinz took a poll on social media to see if there was any interest in bringing the condiment stateside, and 500,000 people voted in favor of the move. This week, the company launched another Twitter poll to see if there's similar interest in the UK.

If you happen to live in Culver City, California; Chicago, Illinois; or Brooklyn, New York, you may have the chance to sample it before anyone else in the country. These cities—preselected by Heinz for being the most "passionate" on social media about bringing Mayochup to the U.S.—are in the running to win a "food truck takeover." Free samples of fries and Mayochup will be dished out to passersby and diehard Heinz fans. People are now taking to Twitter to vote (using the template #MayochupYOURCITY), but act fast—voting ends September 18.

[h/t Us Weekly]

How to Make Classic Chicken Noodle Soup With One Pot

iStock
iStock

Chicken noodle soup is the perfect meal to take you out of grilling season and into the days of comforting, cold-weather food. If you've only had chicken soup from your parents' kitchen or out of a can, you might assume the recipe takes more time than it's worth. But a soul-warming dish doesn't have to be labor-intensive: Martha Stewart's take on the recipe can be achieved with just one pot and 20 minutes of active cooking time.

Stewart's recipe for one-pot classic chicken noodle soup, from her book One Pot: 120+ Easy Meals from Your Skillet, Slow Cooker, Stockpot, and More, keeps things simple. Start with a whole chicken cut into eight pieces, or about four pounds of separate chicken parts, and add it to a stock pot with four cups of chicken broth, five cups of water, and one teaspoon of salt. Bring the water to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low, skimming any foam off the surface as you go.

After giving the liquid a chance to simmer for five minutes, add your vegetables and aromatics: two sliced onions, four sliced carrots, 12 sprigs of parsley, two sliced celery stalks, and four crushed cloves of garlic. Partially cover the pot and let it simmer for 25 minutes.

Once the chicken is cooked through, remove it, along with the parsley, from the broth. Toss out the parsley and tear the chicken from the bones until you have about three cups of meat. Bring the broth back to a boil, then add two ounces of angel hair pasta and simmer for five minutes. Add the chicken meat back in and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

This recipe makes about eight servings, which works perfectly as a meal for a crowd or a make-ahead lunch for the week. If you're looking for more low-stress comfort food, check out this recipe for the world's best macaroni and cheese.

[h/t Martha Stewart]

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