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Why Did the Nazis Hijack the Swastika?

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Reader Scott from Vermont wrote to ask, “Why did the Nazis adopt the ancient sacred symbol of the swastika as their emblem?”

Before the Nazis started using it and ruined it for everyone, the swastika had a long history throughout the world. Archaeologists have found evidence of the symbol’s use everywhere from Europe to Africa to Asia, going back thousands and thousands of years to the Iron and Bronze Ages. 

According to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the swastika came back into wide use in Europe in the late 1800s following “extensive archeological work such as that of the famous archeologist Heinrich Schliemann.”

“Schliemann discovered the hooked cross on the site of ancient Troy,” the museum says, and linked it to similar shapes found on German artifacts. He concluded that it was a “significant religious symbol of our remote ancestors.” After those discoveries, the swastika became a common symbol of good luck in Europe and abroad. 

“Pretty soon swastikas were everywhere, rotating both clockwise and counterclockwise,” Sarah Boxer wrote in the New York Times. They popped up in Rudyard Kipling’s signature, on Coca-Cola pendants, Carlsberg beer bottles, American army shoulder patches, and even Boy Scout merit badges. 

At the same time, certain individuals and groups adopted the symbol for less wholesome reasons. German nationalist movements saw the swastika as the Germans’ link to the Aryan “master race” and a “symbol of ‘Aryan identity’ and German nationalist pride,” the Holocaust Museum says, and it soon “became associated with the idea of a racially ‘pure’ state.”

Hitler wrote in Mein Kampf that the Nazis’ emblem needed to be both a “symbol of our own struggle” and “effective as a large poster,” and the swastika, as the nationalist movements were using it, fit the bill. 

The Nazis officially adopted a red flag with a white circle and black swastika in 1920. Hitler wrote of the flag (emphasis mine), “We National Socialists regarded our flag as being the embodiment of our party programme. The red expressed the social thought underlying the movement. White the national thought. And the swastika signified the mission allotted to us—the struggle for the victory of Aryan mankind and at the same time the triumph of the ideal of creative work which is in itself and always will be anti-Semitic.”

After millions of people were systematically killed under swastika flags by men wearing swastikas on their uniforms, the symbol become one of genocide, fascism, and racism, and any other connotations it might have had were lost in the West. Like the Chaplin-esque toothbrush mustache that Hitler wore, the swastika is pretty much off limits, though some people are trying to rehabilitate it. 

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15 Riveting Facts About Alan Turing
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More than six decades after his death, Alan Turing’s life remains a point of fascination, even for people who have no interest in his groundbreaking work in computer science. He has been the subject of a play and an opera, and referenced in multiple novels and numerous musical albums. The Benedict Cumberbatch film about his life, The Imitation Game, received eight Oscar nominations. But just who was he in real life? Here are 15 facts you should know about Alan Turing.

1. HE’S THE FATHER OF MODERN COMPUTER SCIENCE.

Turing essentially pioneered the idea of computer memory. In 1936, Turing published a seminal paper called “On Computable Numbers” [PDF], which The Washington Post has called “the founding document of the computer age.” In the philosophical article, he hypothesized that one day, we could build machines that could compute any problem that a human could, using 0s and 1s. Turing proposed single-task machines called Turing machines that would be capable of solving just one type of math problem, but a “universal computer” would be able to tackle any kind of problem thrown at it by storing instructional code in the computer’s memory. Turing’s ideas about memory storage and using a single machine to carry out all tasks laid the foundation for what would become the digital computer.

In 1945, while working for the UK’s National Physical Laboratory, he came up with the Automatic Computing Machine, the first digital computer with stored programs. Previous computers didn’t have electric memory storage, and had to be manually rewired to switch between different programs.

2. HE PLAYED A HUGE ROLE IN WINNING WORLD WAR II.

Turing began working at Bletchley Park, Britain’s secret headquarters for its codebreakers during World War II, in 1939. By one estimate, his work there may have cut the war short by up to two years. He’s credited with saving millions of lives.

Turing immediately got to work designing a codebreaking machine called the Bombe (an update of a previous Polish machine) with the help of his colleague Gordon Welchman. The Bombe shortened the steps required in decoding, and 200 of them were built for British use over the course of the war. They allowed codebreakers to decipher up to 4000 messages a day.

His greatest achievement was cracking the Enigma, a mechanical device used by the German army to encode secure messages. It proved nearly impossible to decrypt without the correct cipher, which the German forces changed every day. Turing worked to decipher German naval communications at a point when German U-boats were sinking ships carrying vital supplies across the Atlantic between Allied nations. In 1941, Turing and his team managed to decode the German Enigma messages, helping to steer Allied ships away from the German submarine attacks. In 1942, he traveled to the U.S. to help the Americans with their own codebreaking work.

3. HE BROKE THE RULES TO WRITE TO CHURCHILL.

Early on, Bletchley Park’s operations were hampered by a lack of resources, but pleas for better staffing were ignored by government officials. So, Alan Turing and several other codebreakers at Bletchley Park went over their heads to write directly to Prime Minister Winston Churchill. One of the codebreakers from Bletchley Park delivered the letter by hand in October 1941.

“Our reason for writing to you direct is that for months we have done everything that we possibly can through the normal channels, and that we despair of any early improvement without your intervention,” they wrote to Churchill [PDF]. “No doubt in the long run these particular requirements will be met, but meanwhile still more precious months will have been wasted, and as our needs are continually expanding we see little hope of ever being adequately staffed.”

In response, Churchill immediately fired off a missive to his chief of staff: “Make sure they have all they want on extreme priority and report to me that this had been done.”

4. HE HAD SOME ODD HABITS.

Like many geniuses, Turing was not without his eccentricities. He wore a gas mask while riding his bike to combat his allergies. Instead of fixing his bike’s faulty chain, he learned exactly when to dismount to secure it in place before it slipped off. He was known around Bletchley Park for chaining his tea mug to a radiator to prevent it from being taken by other staffers.

5. HE RODE HIS BIKE 60 MILES TO GET TO THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL.

Though he was considered an average student, Turing was dedicated enough to his schooling that when a general strike prevented him from taking the train to his first day at his new elite boarding school, the 14-year-old rode his bike the 62 miles instead.

6. HE TRIED OUT FOR THE OLYMPICS.

Turing started running as a schoolboy and continued throughout his life, regularly running the 31 miles between Cambridge and Ely while he was a fellow at King’s College. During World War II, he occasionally ran the 40 miles between London and Bletchley Park for meetings.

He almost became an Olympic athlete, too. He came in fifth place at a qualifying marathon for the 1948 Olympics with a 2-hour, 46-minute finish (11 minutes slower than the 1948 Olympic marathon winner). However, a leg injury held back his athletic ambitions that year.

Afterward, he continued running for the Walton Athletic Club, though, and served as its vice president. ”I have such a stressful job that the only way I can get it out of my mind is by running hard,” he once told the club’s secretary. “It's the only way I can get some release."

7. HE WAS PROSECUTED FOR BEING GAY.

In 1952, Turing was arrested after reporting a burglary in his home. In the course of the investigation, the police discovered Turing’s relationship with another man, Arnold Murray. Homosexual relationships were illegal in the UK at the time, and he was charged with “gross indecency.” He pled guilty on the advice of his lawyer, and opted to undergo chemical castration instead of serving time in jail.

8. THE GOVERNMENT ONLY RECENTLY APOLOGIZED FOR HIS CONVICTION …

In 2009, UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown issued a public apology to Turing on behalf of the British government. “Alan and the many thousands of other gay men who were convicted as he was convicted under homophobic laws were treated terribly,” Brown said. "This recognition of Alan's status as one of Britain's most famous victims of homophobia is another step towards equality and long overdue." Acknowledging Britain’s debt to Turing for his vital contributions to the war effort, he announced, “on behalf of the British government, and all those who live freely thanks to Alan's work I am very proud to say: we're sorry, you deserved so much better."

His conviction was not actually pardoned, though, until 2013, when he received a rare royal pardon from the Queen of England.

9. … AND NAMED A LAW AFTER HIM.

Turing was only one of the many men who suffered after being prosecuted for their homosexuality under 19th-century British indecency laws. Homosexuality was decriminalized in the UK in 1967, but the previous convictions were never overturned. Turing’s Law, which went into effect in 2017, posthumously pardoned men who had been convicted for having consensual gay sex before the repeal. According to one of the activists who campaigned for the mass pardons, around 15,000 of the 65,000 gay men convicted under the outdated law are still alive.

10. HE POISONED HIMSELF … MAYBE.

There is still a bit of mystery surrounding Turing’s death at the age of 41. Turing died of cyanide poisoning, in what is widely believed to have been a suicide. Turing’s life had been turned upside down by his arrest. He lost his job and his security clearance. By order of the court, he had to take hormones intended to “cure” his homosexuality, which caused him to grow breasts and made him impotent. But not everyone is convinced that he died by suicide.

In 2012, Jack Copeland, a Turing scholar, argued that the evidence used to declare Turing’s death a suicide in 1954 would not be sufficient to close the case today. The half-eaten apple by his bedside, thought to be the source of his poisoning, was never tested for cyanide. There was still a to-do list on his desk, and his friends told the coroner at the time that he had seemed in good spirits. Turing’s mother, in fact, maintained that he probably accidentally poisoned himself while experimenting with the chemical in his home laboratory. (He was known to taste chemicals while identifying them, and could be careless with safety precautions.)

That line of inquiry is far more tame than some others, including one author’s theory that he was murdered by the FBI to cover up information that would have been damaging to the U.S.

11. HIS FULL GENIUS WASN’T KNOWN IN HIS LIFETIME.

Alan Turing was a well-respected mathematician in his time, but his contemporaries didn’t know the full extent of his contributions to the world. Turing’s work breaking the Enigma machine remained classified long after his death, meaning that his contributions to the war effort and to mathematics were only partially known to the public during his lifetime. It wasn’t until the 1970s that his instrumental role in the Allies' World War II victory became public with the declassification of the Enigma story. The actual techniques Turing used to decrypt the messages weren’t declassified until 2013, when two of his papers from Bletchley Park were released to the British National Archives.

12. THE TURING TEST IS STILL USED TO MEASURE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE …

Can a machine fool a human into thinking they are chatting with another person? That’s the crux of the Turing test, an idea developed by Turing in 1950 regarding how to measure artificial intelligence. Turing argued in his paper “Computing Machinery and Intelligence” [PDF] that the idea of machines “thinking” is not a useful way to evaluate artificial intelligence. Instead, Turing suggests “the imitation game,” a way to assess how successfully a machine can imitate human behavior. The best measure of artificial intelligence, then, is whether or not a computer can convince a person that it is human.

13. … BUT SOME CONSIDER IT TO BE AN OUTDATED IDEA.

As technology has progressed, some feel the Turing test is no longer a useful way to measure artificial intelligence. It’s cool to think about computers being able to talk just like a person, but new technology is opening up avenues for computers to express intelligence in other, more useful ways. A robot’s intelligence isn’t necessarily defined by whether it can fake being human—self-driving cars or programs that can mimic sounds based on images might not pass the Turing test, but they certainly have intelligence.

14. HE CREATED THE FIRST COMPUTER CHESS PROGRAM.

Inspired by the chess champions he worked with at Bletchley Park, Alan Turing created an algorithm for an early version of computer chess—although at that time, there was no computer to try it out on. Created with paper and pencil, the Turochamp program was designed to think two moves ahead, picking out the best moves possible. In 2012, Russian chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov played against Turing’s algorithm, beating it in 16 moves. “I would compare it to an early caryou might laugh at them but it is still an incredible achievement," Kasparov said in a statement after the match-up.

15. THERE IS ALAN TURING MONOPOLY.

In 2012, Monopoly came out with an Alan Turing edition to celebrate the centennial of his birth. Turing had enjoyed playing Monopoly during his life, and the Turing-themed Monopoly edition was designed based on a hand-drawn board created in 1950 by his friend William Newman. Instead of hotels and houses, it featured huts and blocks inspired by Bletchley Park, and included never-before-published photos of Turing. (It’s hard to find, but there are still a few copies of the game on Amazon.)

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17 Little-Known Facts About Max Planck
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These days, Max Planck’s name comes up most by way of the prestigious scientific institutes named after him. (The Max Planck Society runs 83 throughout Germany and the world.) But who was the real Max Planck, and why would there be so many research centers in his name? Here are 17 facts about the theoretical physicist.

1. HE CREATED ONE OF THE PILLARS OF MODERN PHYSICS.

There are two theories that modern physics uses to explain the universe. There is relativity—Einstein’s work—and there is quantum theory, invented by Planck. In the late 1890s, he began his work studying thermal radiation and found a formula for black-body radiation, one that eventually became Planck’s Law. To explain why his formula worked, he introduced the idea of packets of energy he called “quanta,” giving rise to the branch of quantum physics.

He himself was surprised at the radical nature of his own discoveries, writing, “My futile attempts to put the elementary quantum of action into the classical theory continued for a number of years and they cost me a great deal of effort.”

By the time he died, though, Planck was a legend in the scientific world. “Max Planck was one of the intellectual giants of the 20th century and one of the outstanding intellects of all time,” The New York Times wrote upon his death in October 1947, ranking “with the immortals of science, such as Archimedes, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein.”

2. AND HE HELPED NAME THE OTHER ONE.

Planck helped popularize the term “theory” to describe Einstein’s relativity work. In a 1906 talk, he referred to the model of physics put forth by Einstein as “Relativtheorie,” which became “Relativitätstheorie,” or “relativity theory.” Einstein himself referred to it as the “relativity principle,” but Planck’s terminology caught on.

3. HE WON A NOBEL.

Planck was a highly respected academic in his lifetime. As science writer Barbara Lovett Cline explains, “In Germany at this time only princes and barons were accorded more respect than professors,” and Planck was no exception. He racked up a multitude of awards in his academic career before finally winning the Nobel Prize in Physics at the age of 60. He received more nominations for the Nobel from a wider range of physicists than any other candidate at the time. He finally received the prize for 1918 “in recognition of [his] epoch-making investigations into the quantum theory,” as the president of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said upon presenting the award.

4. HE WAS ONE OF EINSTEIN’S EARLIEST SUPPORTERS.

Planck recognized the importance of Einstein’s work on relativity early, and was one of the first important boosters of his theories. “Einstein may be considered Planck’s second great discovery in physics,” J.L. Heilbron writes in his book The Dilemmas of an Upright Man: Max Planck as a Spokesman for German Science, “and his support, in Einstein’s judgment, was instrumental in securing the swift acceptance of new ideas among physicists.” At the time, Einstein didn’t have a Ph.D. or work at a university, and the support of an established, famous scientist like Planck helped usher him into the mainstream. Though he would remain skeptical of aspects of the younger scientist’s work—like his 1915 research on “light quanta,” or photons—the two remained friends and close colleagues for much of their lives. According to Planck’s obituary in The New York Times, “When the Physical Society of Berlin conferred on him a special medal, he handed a duplicate of it to his friend, Einstein.”

5. HE WAS A GREAT MUSICIAN.

Planck was a gifted pianist and almost dedicated his career to music instead of physics. He hosted musical salons at his home, inviting other physicists and academics as well as professional musicians. Albert Einstein attended [PDF], sometimes picking up the violin to play in quartets or trios with Planck. According to Heilbron, “Planck’s sense of pitch was so perfect that he could scarcely enjoy a concert,” lest it be ruined by an off-key note.

6. A PROFESSOR WARNED HIM NOT TO GO INTO PHYSICS.

Not long after the 16-year-old Planck got to the University of Munich in 1874, physics professor Philipp von Jolly tried to dissuade the young student from going into theoretical physics. Jolly argued that other scientists had basically figured out all there was to know. “In this field, almost everything is already discovered, and all that remains is to fill a few holes,” he told Planck. Luckily, the budding scientist ignored his advice.

7. HIS LECTURES WERE STANDING-ROOM-ONLY.

Though he was described as a bit dry in front of a classroom, Planck’s students loved him. English chemist James Partington said he was “the best lecturer [he] ever heard,” describing Planck’s lectures as crowded, popular affairs. “There were always many standing around the room,” according to Partington. “As the lecture-room was well heated and rather close, some of the listeners would from time to time drop to the floor, but this did not disturb the lecture.”

8. HE KEPT A STRICT SCHEDULE.

In The Dilemmas of an Upright Man, Heilbron describes Planck as an “exact economist with his time.” He ate breakfast precisely at 8 a.m then worked in a flurry until noon every day. In the evenings and during university breaks, though, he relaxed and entertained friends. His routine involved “a rigid schedule during term—writing and lecturing in the morning, lunch, rest, piano, walk, correspondence—and equally unrelenting recreation—mountain climbing without stopping or talking and Alpine accommodation without comfort or privacy,” according to Heilbron.

9. HE WAS A LIFELONG MOUNTAIN CLIMBER.

Planck stayed active throughout his life, hiking and mountain climbing well into old age. In his 80s, he still regularly climbed Alpine peaks reaching more than 9800 feet in height.

10. HE WAS PRETTY GOOD AT TAG.

“Planck loved merry, relaxed company and his home was the center of such conviviality,” famed nuclear physicist Lise Meitner described in 1958 (as quoted by the Max Planck Society). “When the invitations happened to be during the summer term, there would be energetic games in the garden afterwards in which Planck participated with downright childish glee and great adeptness. It was almost impossible not to be tagged by him. And how visibly pleased he was when he had caught someone!"

11. THE GESTAPO INVESTIGATED HIM DURING WORLD WAR II.

Due to his outspoken support of Jewish physicists like Einstein, Planck was labeled by the nationalist Aryan Physics faction of academics as being part of a grand Jewish conspiracy to keep German scientists from appointments in university physics departments Along with other physicists in Einstein’s circle, he was called a “bacteria carrier” and a “white Jew” in the official SS newspaper, Das Schwarze Korps, and his ancestry was investigated by the Gestapo.

12. HE PERSONALLY ASKED HITLER TO LET JEWISH SCIENTISTS KEEP THEIR JOBS.

Though Planck didn’t always support his Jewish colleagues against the Nazis—he chastised Einstein for not returning to Germany after Hitler came to power and eventually dismissed Jewish members of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (later the Max Planck Society) due to pressure from the Third Reich [PDF]—he did make several stands against Nazi policies. He fought against the inclusion of Nazi party members in the Prussian Academy and, as president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, met with Hitler and appealed to the Führer to let certain Jewish scientists keep their jobs.

It didn't work. In 1935, one in five German scientists had been dismissed from their posts (as many as one in four in the field of physics) and supporting Jewish scientists became increasingly risky. Still, in 1935, Planck convened a commemorative meeting of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society to honor the late Jewish chemist Fritz Haber despite an explicit government ban on attending the event. His prominent support of Jewish scientists like Haber and Einstein and refusal to join the Nazi Party eventually resulted in the government forcing him out of his position at the Prussian Academy of Sciences and blocking him from receiving certain professional awards.

13. BUT HE HAD A COMPLICATED RELATIONSHIP WITH THE NAZIS.

He was one of many apolitical civil servants in German academia who hoped that the worst effects of anti-Semitic nationalism would eventually pass, and who wanted to maintain Germany’s importance on the world scientific stage as much as possible in the meantime. When Hitler began demanding that speeches open with “Heil Hitler,” Planck begrudgingly complied. As physicist Paul Ewald described of his address at the opening of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Metals in the 1930s, “… we were all staring at Planck, waiting to see what he would do at the opening, because at that time it was prescribed officially that you had to open such addresses with ‘Heil Hitler.’ Well, Planck stood on the rostrum and lifted his hand half high, and let it sink again. He did it a second time. Then finally the hand came up and he said ‘Heil Hitler.’ … Looking back, it was the only thing you could do if you didn’t want to jeopardize the whole [Kaiser Wilhelm Society].” As science writer Philip Ball describes, for Planck, the rise of Hitler and Nazi Germany was a “catastrophe that had engulfed him, and which in the end destroyed him.”

14. HIS SON WAS LINKED TO A PLOT TO ASSASSINATE HITLER.

Erwin Planck was a high-ranking government official before the Nazis came to power, and although he resigned from political life in 1933, he secretly helped craft a constitution for a post-Nazi government. In 1944, he was arrested and accused of taking part in Claus Stauffenberg’s assassination attempt on Adolf Hitler, in which the Nazi leader was wounded by an exploding briefcase. While it seems that Erwin didn’t directly take part in the bombing plot, he did recruit supporters for the conspirators, and he was sentenced to death for treason. Trying to save his favorite son’s life, the 87-year-old Max Planck wrote personal letters begging for clemency to both Hitler and the head of the SS, Heinrich Himmler. Erwin was executed in 1945.

15. HIS MOTTO WAS “PERSEVERE AND CONTINUE WORKING.”

After World War I, Planck encouraged his fellow scientists to ignore the turbulence of politics to focus on the greater importance of their scientific achievements. “Persevere and continue working” was his slogan.

16. HE CALLED PHYSICS “THE MOST SUBLIME SCIENTIFIC PURSUIT IN LIFE.”

In his autobiography, Planck described why he chose to pursue physics. “The outside world is something independent from man, something absolute, and the quest for the laws which apply to this absolute appeared to me as the most sublime scientific pursuit in life,” he wrote.

17. THERE ARE MANY THINGS NAMED AFTER HIM.

Several discoveries by Planck were eventually named after him, including Planck’s law, Planck’s constant (h, or 6.62607004 × 10^-34 joule-seconds), and Planck units. There is the Planck era (the first stage of the Big Bang), the Planck particle (a tiny black hole), the lunar crater Planck, and the European Space Agency spacecraft Planck, among others. Not to mention the Max Planck Society and its 83 Max Planck Institutes.

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