This Is Not a Drill: Oscar Mayer's Wienermobile Needs New Drivers

Tim Boyle, Getty Images
Tim Boyle, Getty Images

The Oscar Mayer Wienermobile has had many navigators over its 83-year history, including performers and a race car driver. Now, the Oscar Mayer company is looking for a new generation of 'hotdoggers' to get behind the wheel of the iconic ride.

KSDK reports that applications are being accepted for the one-year position now through January 31. Hotdoggers tasked with commandeering the Wienermobile will be responsible for doing media interviews and appearing at grocery store, military, and charity events across the country. The position is primarily a PR job, and candidates with a BA or BS in public relations, journalism, communications, advertising, or marketing are preferred.

Carl Mayer, the nephew of Oscar Mayer, introduced the first Wienermobile in 1936, and today there are six vehicles on the road making 1400 stops a year. After disappearing for a couple decades, the Wienermobile was revived in 1986 for its 50th anniversary. Oscar Mayer hires 12 new hotdoggers each year and usually receives more than 1000 applications.

The job comes with benefits and a competitive salary in addition to the impressive title. The new hires must be ready to hit the road in June of this year; for a shot at becoming Oscar Mayer's next Wienermobile driver, mail or email your resume [PDF] by the end of the month.

[h/t KSDK]

Locana, Italy Is Paying Families $10,000 to Move There

Not long after Sambuca, Italy enticed people to move there with $1 houses, a different quaint Italian village is offering an even better deal. People reports that Locana, a town located in the Italian Alps, will pay you $10,300 over three years to move there—but the catch is that you have to have at least one child.

Locana is one of many towns in rural Italy that has seen its population age and decline in recent decades. There are roughly 1500 residents in Locana today compared to the 7000 that lived there a century ago, and with 40 deaths and only 10 births per year, the downward trend isn't stopping.

By paying people, specifically families, to move to town, Locana mayor Giovanni Bruno Mattiet hopes to rebuild the community and renew hope for its future. A new population of young people would help keep Locana's school open (the institution comes close to shutting down each year). New residents can work remotely, but Mattiet also welcomes them to take over one of the dozens of defunct shops, bars, and restaurants in town.

Candidates can be foreigners or Italian residents, and they should make a salary of at least $8000 a year. When they're not working, they can partake in the many activities the Gran Paradiso mountain reserve has to offer, such as rock climbing, ice skating, and fishing.

If for some reason getting paid to move to a picturesque town in the Italian Alps isn't your thing, similar offers are sometimes made in the U.S. Last year, both Tulsa, Oklahoma and Vermont lured remote workers with $10,000 checks.

[h/t People]

Here's How Many People Grow Up to Hold Their Childhood Dream Job

iStock.com/chameleonseye
iStock.com/chameleonseye

When kids are told they can grow up to be whatever they want, they tend to dream big. According to a recent survey by TollFreeForwarding, high-paying and glamorous job titles like doctor, actor, and pro sports star are some of the most common childhood dream careers in America. But the same survey also found that just a small fraction of people go on to become what they wanted to be when they were young.

The virtual phone company surveyed 2000 adults in the U.S., asking them what career they dreamed of pursuing when they were teenagers. Public service jobs proved the most popular, with teacher, doctor/nurse, and vet making up the top three spots on the list. Those were followed by musician, actor, pro sports, and writer—all jobs that many kids associate with celebrities. Scientist, lawyer, and artist rounded out the top 10. (You can see the whole breakdown here.)

Of the people surveyed, only 10 percent reported holding their dream job today. The most common reasons they gave for not achieving their childhood dreams were financial limitations, a lack of skills, and prioritizing family. Only 39 percent of people who never landed their dream job said they regretted it.

That 10 percent may seem small, but TollFreeForwarding also found that an additional 14 percent of respondents had held their former dream job at some point in their lives, even if they don't have that job today. And dream jobs aren't always all they're made out to be—among the people surveyed who achieved their childhood dream, just 64 percent said it met their childhood expectations.

If you're still set on pursuing your dream job in light of these facts, there is a right way to go about it. Here are some tips for making your most ambitious career goals come true.

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