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Amazing Color Photos of France After D-Day

In honor of the anniversary of D-Day, LIFE granted us permission to reprint a few photographs from their World War II archives. In stunning color, here's a look at life in France in the summer of 1944.

Frank Scherschel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Original caption: All the civilized world loves France and Paris. Americans share this love with a special intimacy born in the kinship of our revolutions, our ideas and our alliances in two great wars.

Frank Scherschel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Original caption: A French couple shares cognac with an American tank crew, northern France, summer 1944.

See Also: Before & After D-Day: Color Photos from England and France

Frank Scherschel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Original caption: Jeeps (including a press vehicle) in the town square, Marigny (Manche), Normandy, 1944.

See Also: Color Photos from Normandy, Summer 1944

Frank Scherschel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Original caption: American Army trucks (note cyclist hitching a ride) parade down the Champs-Elysées the day after the liberation of Paris by French and Allied troops, August 1944.

Frank Scherschel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Original caption: Paris is like a magic sword in a fairy tale — a shining power in those hands to which it rightly belongs, in other hands tinsel and lead. Whenever the City of Light changes hands, Western Civilization shifts its political balance. So it has been for seven centuries; so it was in 1940; so it was last week.

See Also: Rare Photos from the Allied Invasion of Southern France

Bonus: The First Organized Show for American Troops After D-Day

Ralph Morse—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

LIFE also has a separate gallery of post-D-Day images from the first organized show for American troops in Normandy. There are dancers, acrobats, and this terrifying clown.

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26 Facts About LEGO Bricks

Since it first added plastic, interlocking bricks to its lineup, the Danish toy company LEGO (from the words Leg Godt for “play well”) has inspired builders of all ages to bring their most imaginative designs to life. Sets have ranged in size from scenes that can be assembled in a few minutes to 5000-piece behemoths depicting famous landmarks. And tinkerers aren’t limited to the sets they find in stores. One of the largest LEGO creations was a life-sized home in the UK that required 3.2 million tiny bricks to construct.

In this episode of the List Show, John Green lays out 26 playful facts about one of the world’s most beloved toy brands. To hear about the LEGO black market, the vault containing every LEGO set ever released, and more, check out the video above then subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with the latest flossy content.

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Of Buckeyes and Butternuts: 29 States With Weird Nicknames for Their Residents
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Tracing a word’s origin and evolution can yield fascinating historical insights—and the weird nicknames used in some states to describe their residents are no exception. In the Mental Floss video above, host John Green explains the probable etymologies of 29 monikers that describe inhabitants of certain states across the country.

Some of these nicknames, like “Hoosiers” and “Arkies” (which denote residents of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively) may have slightly offensive connotations, while others—including "Buckeyes," "Jayhawks," "Butternuts," and "Tar Heels"—evoke the military histories of Ohio, Kansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. And a few, like “Muskrats” and “Sourdoughs,” are even inspired by early foods eaten in Delaware and Alaska. ("Goober-grabber" sounds goofier, but it at least refers to peanuts, which are a common crop in Georgia, as well as North Carolina and Arkansas.)

Learn more fascinating facts about states' nicknames for their residents by watching the video above.

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