12 Smashing Facts About the Super Smash Bros. Video Games

Farley Santos, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
Farley Santos, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Super Smash Bros. debuted on the Nintendo 64 in 1999 (first in Japan in January, then North America in April, and then Europe in November), and since then it has grown into one of the most popular franchises in gaming. It has sold more than 40 million units with its six different releases, and it still makes fans go absolutely bonkers each time there is an announcement about the series. In a way, Smash Bros. is like the Fantasy Football of gaming: a fighting game acting as a glorified Nintendo commercial that, in effect, exposes players to some of the company's lesser-known entities (like Earthbound and Kid Icarus). Thanks to it, the series boasts an abundance of quirky facts and details from its impressive 20-year run.

1. Super Smash Bros. was first referred to as "Pepsiman" during development.

image of Pepsiman
Takashi Hososhima, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

During the early stages of development, a small team of people led by Japanese designer Masahiro Sakurai worked on a prototype for a new kind of fighting game. Since Sakurai had not yet gotten the approval from Nintendo to use their characters, the original build featured some primitive polygonal figures, prompting the team to refer to the game as "Pepsiman" due to the similarity between them and the old marketing campaign mascot that Pepsi used in Japan during the 1990s. (Pepsiman, incidentally, also had his own videogame on PlayStation.)

2. The lead designer of the series voices King Dedede.

Hailing from the Kirby franchise, King Dedede is one of the few characters in Super Smash Bros. voiced by someone different than the character's original actor. Instead, he was voiced by none other than the creator of Super Smash Bros. himself, Masahiro Sakurai. His dialogue is mostly comprised of strange laughs and brawny grunts, but it is entertaining to know the lead designer of the series is the voice behind that sinister penguin, mischievous smirk and all.

3. There was an entire website that revealed new information on the latest game every day.

Masahiro Sakurai, creator and director of Nintendo's Super Smash Bros. series, welcomes the crowd at an event in 2014.
Masahiro Sakurai, creator and director of Nintendo's Super Smash Bros. series, welcomes the crowd at an event in 2014.
Bob Riha, Jr./Nintendo, Getty Images

Back before the release of the highly anticipated Super Smash Bros. Brawl in 2008, there was a special fan page that generated hype for the game. This "Smash Dojo," as it was called, delivered teasers and new bits of information about Brawl every day until the game was released, varying from little screenshots to new character announcements, all provided by Sakurai himself. One of the dojo's most memorable reveals, which they dropped about two-and-a-half months before Brawl was released, was that Sonic the Hedgehog would be a playable fighter. As one might say today, it broke the internet.

4. The soundtrack for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate features over 24 hours of songs.

The music that accompanies video games can become just as integral to culture and iconic as the game itself (is there a single person who wouldn't recognize the Super Mario Bros. theme?). But for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, which was released at the end of 2018 and quickly became the fastest-selling Nintendo Switch game ever, the music team went above and beyond: Ultimate boasts more than 800 songs from over 25 different gaming franchises, whether you're in the mood for the heroic orchestration of Zelda or the more futuristic-rock of Splatoon. In a way, Ultimate is like a greatest hits soundtrack that just happens to have a full-fledged game included, too.

5. The Master Hand can be unlocked.

Easter eggs are commonplace in all realms of pop culture, gaming included. The Super Smash Bros. series, thanks to the sheer number of characters and properties being represented, is filled with hidden secrets to find. One of these comes from the 2001 game Super Smash Bros. Melee, which was actually discovered many years after the title's release. It revolved around unlocking the game's primary antagonist, the Master Hand, as a playable character. If done correctly, the player can seize control of the sentient hand and can use it to eradicate opponents with ease.

6. The Ice Climbers are the only characters to have been cut after appearing in multiple releases.

Depending on who you ask, the Ice Climbers are either the greatest ally or a most feared adversary when it comes to combat. Nobody would argue, though, that their exclusion from the Wii U iteration of Super Smash Bros. was enormously disappointing, especially considering they'd appeared in multiple games already.

According to Sakurai in an interview in Eurogamer, the characters were cut because they were too complicated for the hardware of the Nintendo 3DS. Both versions of the game (for Wii U and 3DS) were being released in 2014, so Sakurai chose to remove them entirely so that one version wasn't viewed as having less content. Because of the brief absence of the Ice Climbers duo in that series, the announcement that they were returning for Ultimate—along with every other character ever featured in the history of Super Smash Bros.—was a delightful surprise.

7. Solid Snake was added to the game because of a friendship with the creator.

Designer Hideo Kojima at a gaming event in 2008.
Designer Hideo Kojima at a gaming event in 2008.
Rene, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Helmed by director Hideo Kojima, Metal Gear Solid is one of the most innovate franchises in video games (who could forget the boss battle that featured the enemy breaking the fourth wall and literally reading and commentating on the saves of your memory card?). The debut of its main character, Solid Snake, in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, however, was a surprising one. Considering the character's background consists largely of M-rated titles involving plenty of gun violence, Snake was a clear outlier from the more cartoonish and family-friendly Nintendo image. Apparently, Snake's addition to the series came after Kojima—who is a close friend of Sakurai's—"practically begged" to have the character included because his son was such a big fan.

8. The announcer from Bill Nye the Science Guy is the narrator in Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

Most '90s kids will remember the eccentric educational TV series Bill Nye the Science Guy, and it turns out that show's announcer also voiced some Super Smash Bros. characters. In an interview with Smashboard, voice actor and comedian Pat Cashman said that even though he didn't know much about the game beforehand, he knew that it would look "nice on my resumé to say that I was the announcer on what was one of the most popular video games on the planet."

He worked hard to make the announcer voice "big and bombastic," but in one recording session, he recalled he had been seriously dialing up his line-readings only to realize nobody was there. "I remember one time when I was really going for it. Way, way over the top. I remember thinking, 'Man, I am really killing it! This is the best I've ever done!' My arms are waving, I'm jumping up and down, spit flying all over the mic, my shirt's getting sweaty," Cashman said. But then: "The producers, the engineer—everybody had taken a break and were gone. What I thought might have been my best Brawl announcer performance ever had an audience of one: me."

9. Meta Knight and Bayonetta are the only characters to have ever been banned.

Video game character Meta Knight
Everette Murrain, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Considering how in-depth the series's history of characters are and how vastly different each of them operate from one another, there was bound to be some controversy and complaints about certain fighters being unfair or poorly balanced. In this case, the sword-wielding Meta Knight, who first made his debut in the 2008 entry Super Smash Bros. Brawl, and the gun-toting, majestic acrobat Bayonetta, who made her debut in 2014's Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, were both barred by the official Super Smash Bros. fighting-game community for use in official tournaments.

10. The developer also created Kirby.

A Kirby video game cartridge
Bryan Ochalla, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Before they masterminded Super Smash Bros., designer Sakurai and developer HAL Laboratory worked on everyone's favorite spherical alien: Kirby! Back in 1992, HAL Laboratory—which took its name not from the antagonist computer HAL 9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey, but because "each letter put them one step ahead of IBM"—released Kirby's Dream Land for the Game Boy, the first of the franchise that starred the titular pink poof (but not yet with his signature copy ability). Kirby would go on to appear in more than 20 releases across a variety of Nintendo consoles.

11. It spawned some fan fiction that is the longest known work of English literature.

While fan-fiction is certainly capable of being just as entertaining as the original it's mimicking, not many can come close to this epic started by fanfiction.net user AuraChannelerChris in 2008. With over 4 million words, "The Subspace Emissary's Worlds Conquest" is more than three times the length of the entire Harry Potter series combined.

12. James Bond was once considered as a possible playable character.

Likely because of the success of GoldenEye 007 for Nintendo 64, the world's most famous secret agent was at one point considered as an addition to the Smash Bros. roster. Unfortunately, due to many legal issues surrounding the usage of the character and his likeness, the prospect of having James Bond fight against Bowser or Peach while sailing through the air with his rocket-belt was never realized. As Sakurai told the Smash Dojo, "Showing realistic guns = no good! Character uses an actor's likeness = no good! Since the original game is based on a movie, getting those rights = no good! He's Rare’s property = no good! Blocked on all fronts."

We suppose one could say that the idea was shaken, but not stirred.

10 Bold Breaking Bad Fan Theories

Bryan Cranston as Walter White and Aaron Paul as Jesse Pinkman in Breaking Bad.
Bryan Cranston as Walter White and Aaron Paul as Jesse Pinkman in Breaking Bad.
Ben Leuner, AMC

It’s been nearly six years since Breaking Bad went out in a blaze of gunfire, but fans still haven’t stopped thinking about the award-winning crime drama. What really happened to Walter White in the series finale? What’s the backstory on Gus Fring? And what did Jesse Pinkman’s doodles mean?

While El Camino, Vince Gilligan's new Breaking Bad movie, offers definitive answers to at least one of these questions, these fan theories offer some alternative answers—even if they strain the limits of logic and sanity along the way. Read on to discover the surprising source of Walt’s cancer diagnosis, and why pink is always bad news.

1. Walter White picks up traits from the people he kills.

Walter White is an unpredictable guy, but he’s weirdly consistent on one thing: After he kills someone, he kind of copies them. Remember how Krazy-8 liked his sandwiches without the crust? After Walt murdered him, he started eating crustless PB&Js. Walt also lifted Mike Ehrmantraut’s drink order and Gus Fring’s car, leading many fans to wonder if Walt steals personal characteristics from the people he kills.

2. Gus Fring worked for the CIA.

Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito) and Juan Bolsa (Javier Grajeda) in Breaking Bad
Giancarlo Esposito and Javier Grajeda in Breaking Bad.
Ursula Coyote, AMC

Who was Gus Fring before he became the ruthless leader of a meth/fried chicken empire? Well, we know he’s from Chile. We also know that any records of his time there are gone. And we know that cartel kingpin Don Eladio refused to kill him when he had the chance. Since Don Eladio has no qualms about eliminating the competition, Gus must have some form of protection. Could it be from the U.S. government? A detailed Reddit theory suggests that Gus was once a Chilean aristocrat who helped the CIA install the dictator Augusto Pinochet in power. Once Pinochet became a liability, Gus went to Mexico at the CIA’s behest to infiltrate a drug cartel. His alliance with U.S. intelligence kept him alive even as his work got more violent, and helped him bypass the normal immigration issues you'd typically encounter when you’ve murdered a bunch of people.

3. Madrigal built defective air filters that gave Walter white cancer.

Madrigal Electromotive is a corporation with varied interests. The German parent company of Los Pollos Hermanos dabbles in shipping, fast food, and industrial equipment … including air filters. According to one fan theory, Gray Matter—the company Walter White co-founded with Elliott Schwartz—purchased defective air filters from Madrigal and installed them while Walt still worked at the company. The filters ultimately caused Walt’s lung cancer, pushing him into the illegal drug trade and, eventually, business with Madrigal.

4. Color is a crucial element in the series.

Marie Schrader (Betsy Brandt) and Hank Schrader (Dean Norris)
Betsy Brandt and Dean Norris as Marie and Hank Schrader in Breaking Bad.
Ben Leuner, AMC

Color is a code on Breaking Bad. When a character chooses drab tones, they’re usually going through something, like withdrawal (Jesse) or chemo (Walt). Their wardrobe might turn darker as their stories skew darker—like when Marie ditched her trademark purple for black while she was under protective custody. Also, pink signals death, whether it’s on a teddy bear or Saul Goodman’s button down shirt.

5. Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead exist in the same universe.

Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead both aired on AMC, but according to fans, that’s not all they have in common. There’s an exhaustive body of evidence connecting the two shows—and one of the biggest links is Blue Sky. The distinctively-colored crystal meth is Walt and Jesse’s calling card on Breaking Bad, but it’s also Merle Dixon’s drug of choice on The Walking Dead. Coincidentally, his drug dealer (“a janky little white guy” who says “bitch”) sounds a lot like Jesse.

6. Walter white froze to death and hallucinated Breaking Bad's ending.

Bryan Cranston in the 'Breaking Bad' series finale
Ursula Coyote, AMC

In her review of the Breaking Bad series finale “Felina,” The New Yorker critic Emily Nussbaum suggested an alternate ending in which Walt died an episode earlier, as the police surrounded his car in New Hampshire. He could’ve frozen to death “behind the wheel of a car he couldn’t start,” she theorized, and hallucinated the dramatic final shootout in “Felina” in his dying moments. This reading has gained traction with multiple fans, including SNL alum Norm Macdonald.

7. Jesse’s superheroes are a peek into his inner psyche.

In season 2 of Breaking Bad, we discover that Jesse Pinkman is a part-time artist. He sketches his own superheroes, including Backwardo/Rewindo (who can run backwards so fast he rewinds time), Hoverman (who floats above the ground), and Kanga-Man (who has a sidekick in his “pouch”). The characters are goofy, just like Jesse, but they may also reveal what’s going on in his head. Backwardo represents Jesse’s tendency to run from conflict. Hoverman reflects his lack of direction or purpose, while Kanga-Man hints at his codependency.

8. Madrigal was founded by Nazi war criminals.

Walter White (Bryan Cranston) and Uncle Jack (Michael Bowen) in 'Breaking Bad'
Bryan Cranston and Michael Bowen in Breaking Bad.
Ursula Coyote, AMC

This might be one of the wilder Breaking Bad theories, but before you write it off, consider Werner Heisenberg: The German physicist, who helped pioneer Hitler’s nuclear weapons program, is the obvious inspiration for Walt’s meth kingpin moniker. While Heisenberg only appears in name, there are plenty of literal Nazis on the show. Look no further than Uncle Jack and the Aryan Brotherhood, who served as the Big Bad of season 5. At least one Redditor thinks all these Nazi references are hinting at something bigger, a conspiracy that goes straight to the top. The theory starts in South America, where many Nazis fled after World War II. A group of them supposedly formed a new company, Madrigal, through their existing connections back in Germany. Eventually, a young Chilean named Gus Fring worked his way into the growing business, and the rest is (fake) history.

9. Walter white survived, but paid the price.

Lots of Breaking Bad theories concern Walt’s death, or lack thereof. But if Walt actually lived through his seemingly fatal gunshot wound in “Felina,” what would the rest of his life look like? According to one Reddit theory, it wouldn’t be pretty. The infamous Heisenberg would almost certainly stand trial and go to prison. Although he tries to leave Skyler White with information to cut a deal with the cops, she could also easily go to jail—or lose custody of her children. The kids wouldn’t necessarily get that money Walt left with Elliott and Gretchen Schwartz, either, as they could take his threats to the police and surrender the cash to them. Basically it amounts to a whole lot of misery, making Walt’s death an oddly optimistic ending. (This is one theory El Camino addresses directly.)

10. Breaking Bad is a prequel to Malcolm in the Middle.

Bryan Cranston in the series premiere of 'Breaking Bad'
Bryan Cranston in the series premiere of Breaking Bad.
Doug Hyun, AMC

Alright, let’s say Walt survived the series finale and didn’t stand trial. Maybe he started over as a new man with a new family. Three boys, perhaps? This fan-favorite theory claims that Walter White assumed a new identity as Malcolm in the Middle patriarch Hal after the events of Breaking Bad, making the show a prequel to Bryan Cranston’s beloved sitcom. The Breaking Bad crew actually liked this idea so much they included an “alternate ending” on the DVD boxed set, where Hal wakes up from a bad dream where "There was a guy who never spoke! He just rang a bell the whole time! And then there was another guy who was a policeman or a DEA agent, and I think it was my brother or something. He looked like the guy from The Shield."

Fan Notices Hilarious Connection Between Joaquin Phoenix's Joker and Superbad's McLovin

Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

There seems to be exactly one funny thing about Todd Phillips's latest film, Joker.

As reported by Geek.com, someone on Twitter by the name of @minalopezavina brilliantly pointed out that Arthur Fleck from Joker and McLovin from Superbad are pretty much in the same costume.

This meme is a nice moment of comic relief in an otherwise very serious movie. In fact, Joker is so dark that the United States Army had issued warnings about possible shootings at theaters playing the film. The warnings coincided with criticisms that the film might be too violent, with fears that the villain-led storyline would result in copycat events in real life.

Both Phillips and star Joaquin Phoenix have weighed in on the controversy, with the director explaining to The Wrap, "It wasn’t, ‘We want to glorify this behavior.’ It was literally like ‘Let’s make a real movie with a real budget and we’ll call it f**king Joker’. That’s what it was.”

All we can say is the amount of chatter behind Joker certainly led to both packed theaters, and endless memes online.

[h/t Geek.com]

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