A Statistical Breakdown of the Contents of a Celebrations Tub

Simon Brew
Simon Brew

Back in 2014, the world was a very different place. But this isn’t one of those articles with a cunning political subtext. Nope, we’re here to talk about chocolate.

However, the news remains gloomy.

It was in December 2014 that I bought a collection of Celebrations chocolate tubs from some fine UK retailers. Batches were mixed, chocolates were emptied, and each tub was duly counted out. Four years on, I repeated the exercise. My dining room table was covered in Celebrations chocolates, as I analysed the contents of ten sample tubs. Then I did a statistical breakdown of what you’re getting for your cash.

If you’re in the mood for some humble festive nostalgia, consider this. In 2014, a standard Celebrations tub weighted in at 750g, included wrappers. For your money, you could expect:

- 15 Mars
- 12.3 Malteasers (sic)
- 12.2 Milky Way
- 12 Bounty
- 11.7 Snickers
- 7 Twix
- 6 Galaxy
- 6 Galaxy Caramel

A quick bit of maths later, and on average, you could expect to get 82.4 chocolates per individual tub.

It’s my sad duty to inform you that, just four years later, the world has dramatically changed.

Whilst the retail price of the average tub has remained constant, what you actually get for your money has diminished significantly. In fact – and how’s this for a headline finding? – you’re getting on average 9.775 fewer chocolates per tub. That’s a decrease of 11.9% in just a four year period. And we’re told that the era of austerity is coming to an end!

What’s more, the make-up of the contents has changed as well. Whilst we still get the core selection of eight different chocolates, it’s very much Galaxy and Galaxy Caramel that now pick up the slack. Conversely, there’s been a significant decrease in Mars rations. I can exclusively-ish reveal that the number of Mars Bars in a Celebrations tub has dropped by an enormous 52.5% in a four year period.

There are other key findings, too:
• 28% of a Celebrations tub is now made up of some flavour of Galaxy, up from just under 15% in 2014.

• The variance was more significant. The number of chocolates in one tub varied from 70 to 75. In each tub, only Malteasers and Snickers were present in the same number across each. We got ten and nine of those in each individual tub respectively.

• Outside of Galaxy variants, the only chocolate to register an increase in quantity was the Twix, up from 7 a tub to 8.5.

• You’re likely to get more Bounty bars than anything else, and the least common chocolate is now the Mars – four years after it topped the chart. It’s legitimately fallen from the top to the bottom in just four years.

• The fewest number of individual chocolates you could expect in any tub is 6, the most is 11.

Here, then, are the numbers. They make grim reading:


Simon Brew

It’s tough times out there this Christmas, folks. Look after each other, and try not to squabble over the reduced number of Mars Bars. The world has suffered enough.

Simon Brew was the founder of Den of Geek and previously served as UK editor for Mental Floss. You can follow him on Twitter.

5 Fast Facts About the Spring Equinox

iStock.com/AHPhotoswpg
iStock.com/AHPhotoswpg

The northern hemisphere has officially survived a long winter of Arctic temperatures, bomb cyclones, and ice tsunamis. Spring starts today, March 20, which means warmer weather and longer days are around the corner. To celebrate the spring equinox, hear are some facts about the event.

1. The spring equinox arrives at 5:58 p.m.

The first day of spring is today, but the spring equinox will only be here for a brief time. At 5:58 p.m. Eastern Time, the Sun will be perfectly in line with the equator, which results in both the northern and southern hemispheres receiving equal amounts of sunlight throughout the day. After the vernal equinox has passed, days will start to become shorter for the Southern Hemisphere and longer up north.

2. The Equinox isn't the only time you can balance an egg.

You may have heard the myth that you can balance on egg on its end during the vernal equinox, and you may have even tried the experiment in school. The idea is that the extra gravitational pull from the Sun when it's over the equator helps the egg stand up straight. While it is possible to balance an egg, the trick has nothing to do with the equinox: You can make an egg stand on its end by setting it on a rough surface any day of the year.

3. Not every place gets equal night and day.

The equal night and day split between the northern and southern hemispheres isn't distributed evenly across all parts of the world. Though every region gets approximately 12 hours of sunlight the day of the vernal equinox, some places get a little more (the day is 12 hours and 15 minute in Fairbanks, Alaska), and some get less (it's 12 hours and 6 minutes in Miami).

4. The name means Equal Night.

The word equinox literally translates to equal ("equi") and night ("nox") in Latin. The term vernal means "new and fresh," and comes from the Latin word vernus for "of spring."

5. The 2019 spring equinox coincides with a supermoon.

On March 20, the day the Sun lines up with equator, the Moon will reach the closest point to Earth in its orbit. The Moon will also be full, making it the third supermoon of 2019. A full moon last coincided with the first day of spring on March 20, 1981, and it the two events won't occur within 24 hours of each other again until 2030.

A Full Pink Moon Is Coming in April

Ana Luisa Santo, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0
Ana Luisa Santo, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Mark your calendars for Friday, April 19 and get ready to snap some blurry pictures of the sky on your way to work. A full pink moon will appear early that morning, according to a calendar published by The Old Farmer's Almanac.

Considering that the full moon cycle is completed every 29.5 days, the April full moon will be the fourth full moon of 2019. Despite its name, the surface of the moon doesn't actually appear rosy. The name refers to the wild ground phlox, a type of pink wildflower, that tends to sprout in the U.S. and Canada around this time of year. It's also sometimes called an egg moon, fish moon, or sprouting grass moon.

What does the Full Pink Moon mean?

The April full moon might be a bit of a misnomer, but it still plays a pretty important role in the Christian tradition. The date on which the full pink moon appears has historically been used to determine when Easter will be observed. The holiday always falls on the Sunday following the first full moon that appears after the spring equinox. However, if the full moon falls on a Sunday, Easter will be held the following Sunday.

This rule dates back to 325 C.E., when a group of Christian churches called the First Council of Nicaea decided that the light of the full moon would help guide religious pilgrims as they traveled ahead of the holiday. Since the full moon will be visible on April 19 this year, Easter will be held on April 21.

When to see the full pink moon

The best time to view this April full moon is around 4:12 a.m. on the West Coast and 7:12 a.m. on the East Coast. The exact time will vary depending on your location. For a more specific estimate, head to the Almanac's website and type in your city and state or ZIP code.

If you happen to miss this spectacle because you're enjoying a full night’s sleep, don't fret too much. A full flower moon will be arriving in May.

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