125 Essential Movies, According to Martin Scorsese

Tim P. Whitby, Getty Images
Tim P. Whitby, Getty Images

To be as accomplished and prolific a filmmaker as Martin Scorsese, you’d have to be as accomplished and prolific a filmgoer as Martin Scorsese. The Oscar-winning director would be the first to tell you that he is as much a student of movies as he is a creator, and he regularly shares his ever-growing list of essential films that he believes any true movie fan should see.

In 2012, Fast Company published an extensive interview with Scorsese in which he talked about his 85 movies “you need to see to know anything about film.” Meanwhile, in 2006, a young filmmaker named Colin Levy wrote to the filmmaker, asking for recommendations on where to start an education on foreign films. Scorsese responded with a list of almost 40 suggestions. And, of course, Scorsese shared even more of his favorite films with Sight & Sound magazine.

Each film he has mentioned is listed below, chronologically, so you can start your education at the Scorsese Film School as soon as possible.

1. The Infernal Cakewalk (1903)

2. Secrets of the Soul (1912)

3. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921)

4. Nosferatu (1922)

5. Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922)

6. Metropolis (1927)

7. Napoleon (1927)

8. The Power and the Glory (1933)

9. It Happened One Night (1934)

10. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

11. La Grande Illusion (1937)

12. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

13. Stagecoach (1939)

14. The Roaring Twenties (1939)

15. The Rules Of The Game (1939)

16. Citizen Kane (1941)

17. How Green Was My Valley (1941)

18. Sullivan’s Travels (1941)

19. Cat People (1942)

20. Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)

21. Rome, Open City (1945)

22. Children Of Paradise (1945)

23. Duel in the Sun (1946)

24. Gilda (1946)

25. A Matter of Life and Death (1946)

26. Paisan (1946)

27. Beauty & The Beast (1946)

28. The Lady From Shanghai (1947)

29. T-Men (1947)

30. I Walk Alone (1947)

31. The Red Shoes (1948)

32. Germany Year Zero (1948)

33. Force of Evil (1948)

34. La Terra Trema (1948)

35. Macbeth (1948)

36. Raw Deal (1948)

37. Bicycle Thieves (1948)

38. Caught (1949)

39. The Third Man (1949)

40. Stromboli (1950)

41. The Flowers of St. Francis (1950)

42. Gun Crazy (1950)

43. Night and the City (1950)

44. An American in Paris (1951)

45. The River (1951)

46. Ace in the Hole (1951)

47. The Magic Box (1951)

48. The Bad and the Beautiful (1952)

49. Europa ’51 (1952)

50. Othello (1952)

51. Umberto D. (1952)

52. Ikiru (1952)

53. The Band Wagon (1953)

54. House of Wax (1953)

55. Julius Caesar (1953)

56. Pickup on South Street (1953)

57. Ugetsu (1953)

58. Tokyo Story (1953)

59. Dial M for Murder (1954)

60. Journey to Italy (1954)

61. Senso (1954)

62. Seven Samurai (1954)

63. Sansho the Bailiff (1954)

64. All that Heaven Allows (1955)

65. Kiss Me Deadly (1955)

66. The Searchers (1956)

67. Forty Guns (1957)

68. Sweet Smell of Success (1957)

69. Some Came Running (1958)

70. Touch of Evil (1958)

71. Vertigo (1958)

72. Ashes and Diamonds (1958)

73. Big Deal On Madonna Street (1958)

74. Shadows (1959)

75. The 400 Blows (1959)

76. Peeping Tom (1960)

77. Rocco and His Brothers (1960)

78. Shoot the Piano Player (1960)

79. Breathless (1960)

80. L'Avventura (1960)

81. The Hustler (1961)

82. One, Two, Three (1961)

83. Cape Fear (1962)

84. The Trial (1962)

85. Two Weeks in Another Town (1962)

86. Salvatore Giuliano (1962)

87. Il Sorpasso (1962)

88. America, America (1963)

89. Jason and the Argonauts (1963)

90. The Leopard (1963)

91. Shock Corridor (1963)

92. High and Low (1963)

93.  (1963)

94. The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)

95. Band of Outsiders (1964)

96. Before the Revolution (1964)

97. The Rise of Louis XIV (1966)

98. Blow-Up (1966)

99. Weekend (1967)

100. Faces (1968)

101. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

102. Death by Hanging (1968)

103. Midnight Cowboy (1969)

104. The Butcher (1970)

105. The American Friend (1970)

106. Klute (1971)

107. McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

108. The Merchant of Four Seasons (1971)

109. The Godfather (1972)

110. M*A*S*H (1972)

111. Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972)

112. The Conversation (1974)

113. Ali: Fear Eats The Soul (1974)

114. The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (1974)

115. The Messiah (1975)

116. Nashville (1975)

117. Kings of the Road (1976)

118. Apocalypse Now (1979)

119. The Marriage of Maria Braun (1979)

120. Health (1980)

121. Heaven’s Gate (1980)

122. Mishima (1985)

123. Born on the Fourth of July (1989)

124. Do the Right Thing (1989)

125. The Player (1992)

Welcome to the Party, Pal: A Die Hard Board Game is Coming

Win McNamee, Getty Images
Win McNamee, Getty Images

On the heels of the 30th anniversary of the classic Bruce Willis action film Die Hard last year, tabletop board game company The OP has announced that John McClane will once again battle his way through Nakatomi Plaza. Die Hard: The Nakatomi Heist is a board game officially licensed by Fox Consumer Products that will drop players into a setting familiar to anyone who has seen the film: As New York cop McClane tries to reconcile with his estranged wife, he must navigate a team of cutthroat thieves set on overtaking a Los Angeles high-rise.

The box art for the 'Die Hard: The Nakatomi Heist' board game is pictured
The OP

The game is expected to have a one-against-many format, with one player assuming the role of McClane and the other players conspiring as the thieves to eliminate him from the Plaza.

The OP, also known as USAOpoly, has previously created games based on Avengers: Infinity War and the Harry Potter franchise. Die Hard has spawned four sequels, the latest being 2013’s A Good Day to Die Hard. Willis will likely return as McClane for a sixth installment that will alternate between the present day and his rookie years in the NYPD. That film has no release date set.

The board game is expected to arrive this spring.

[h/t MovieWeb]

Ralph Fiennes Doesn’t Want to See Anyone Else Play Voldemort

WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. // HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS J.K.R
WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. // HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS J.K.R

Who knew actor Ralph Fiennes would be so possessive of his Voldemort role from the Harry Potter movies? After all the hours sitting in a makeup chair, putting on a bald cap, and making his nose disappear day after day, you’d think Fiennes would be ok with never playing this evil character again—especially considering that he almost turned down the role in the first place. But it seems that the character really grew on the two-time Oscar nominee. As Screen Rant reports, Fiennes has made it clear that if Voldemort is ever needed in a future film, he's ready to come back.

“Well, there are variants, aren’t there? Fantastic Beasts and things. I feel a kind of affection for Voldemort," Fiennes said while appearing on Newsnight. "So if there was a world in which Voldemort came back, I would be very possessive about wanting to reprise that."

Voldemort coming back was always a lingering danger in the early Harry Potter books and movies, as fans waited eagerly to see the Dark Lord reborn and return to full power. It was definitely worth the wait when we were finally able to watch Voldemort return toward the end of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the fourth book—and movie—in the series.

As of right now though, it's uncertain whether Fiennes will ever get the chance to reprise his role. The only movies exploring the Wizarding World currently are the Fantastic Beasts films, which take place in 1927. Voldemort was born in 1926, so even if there would be a substantial time jump, Fiennes might be too old to play Voldemort. But at least we know that he is dedicated to the character, and that if Voldemort ever did come back, fans could count on him to jump right back into the role.

[h/t: Screen Rant]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER