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Lou Gehrig's Heartbreaking Letter of Optimism

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On June 19, 1939, the doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota diagnosed Lou Gehrig with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). It was the beloved Yankees first baseman's 36th birthday. The prognosis was unequivocal: a rapid decline and a life expectancy of just three more years.

Gehrig didn't make it that long, succumbing to the disease that would eventually bear his name on June 2, 1941. But during those final two years of his life, Gehrig felt, at least once, glimmers of optimism and even hope that maybe the inevitable would not come to pass.

"As for a report on my condition (and I hope it is not my imagination), I definitely feel that the Thiamin injections are working nothing short of miracles," Gehrig wrote in a September 13, 1939 letter to Dr. Paul O'Leary, his point of contact at the Mayo Clinic and close friend during his final stage of life. The letter, which is still in the possession of the O'Leary family, is currently being auctioned off by SCP Auctions, with just over a day remaining.

Images courtesy of SCP Auctions

The whole letter is worth a read, but there are certainly some highlights: "And before I go any further," the opening paragraph says, "may I frankly assure you that I haven't even had ONE beer." The rueful sentiment is echoed in a later parenthetical, but most of the letter consists of a detailed account of how the minor physical tasks of day-to-day life have been eased by the medicine prescribed.

"I hope these indications are as encouraging as I feel they are," Gehrig concluded of the "exceptional decline of fibrillations" and increased motor skills.

The letter also contains pleasantries that show Gehrig's resilient good spirits and utmost gratitude to the Mayo Clinc. He arranged for Dr. and Mrs. O'Leary to attend the World Series—where Gehrig's Yankees would go on to sweep the Cincinnati Reds—as his personal guests, and even offers to procure tickets for some of the other doctors. Gehrig jokes that he "know[s] there will be trouble" as he intends to exclude Ruth O'Leary from his plans to take the Doctor down into the clubhouse.

The letter concludes with a series of convivial postscripts, including a claim that one Harry Geisel is a "swell guy even though he is an umpire," and Gehrig's own signature—one of his last.

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Pop Culture
The Simpsons's Classic Baseball Episode Gets the Mockumentary Treatment
Fox Sports, YouTube
Fox Sports, YouTube

Opinions vary widely about the continued existence of The Simpsons, which just began its 29th season. Some believe the show ran out of steam decades ago, while others see no reason why the satirical animated comedy can’t run forever.

Both sides will no doubt have something to say about the episode airing Sunday, October 22, which reframes the premise of the show’s classic “Homer at the Bat” installment from 1992 as a Ken Burns-style mockumentary titled Springfield of Dreams: The Legend of Homer Simpson.

As Mashable reports, “Homer at the Bat” saw Montgomery Burns launch his own baseball team and populate it with real major league players like Wade Boggs, Steve Sax, and Jose Canseco to dominate the competition. In the one-hour special, the players will discuss their (fictional) participation, along with interviews featuring Homer and other members of the animated cast.

It’s not clear how much of the special will break the fourth wall and go into the actual making of the episode, a backstory that involves guest star Ken Griffey Jr. getting increasingly frustrated recording his lines and Canseco’s wife objecting to a scene in which her husband's animated counterpart wakes up in bed with lecherous schoolteacher Edna Krabappel.

Morgan Spurlock (Super-Size Me) directed the special, which is slated to air on Fox at either 3 p.m. EST or 4:30 p.m. EST depending on NFL schedules in local markets. There will also be a new episode of The Simpsons—an annual Halloween-themed "Treehouse of Horror" installment—airing in its regular 8 p.m. time slot.

[h/t Mashable]

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Great Big Story, Youtube
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Seattle Mariners Fans Are Going Crazy for These Crunchy Grasshopper Snacks
Great Big Story, Youtube
Great Big Story, Youtube

Seattle Mariners fans have more than warmed up to the newest, offbeat addition to the Safeco Field concessions menu: toasted grasshoppers covered in chili-lime salt.

The crunchy snack, which sells for $4 and comes packed in a small container, has only been available for less than a season but has already sold 300,000-plus orders to date. That's about 1000 pounds of grasshoppers. 

Frequenters of Seattle's popular Mexican restaurant Poquitos will know that this delicacy—which first started as a novelty item on its menu—has actually been available to the public for six years. But it wasn't until local chef Ethan Stowell was hired to give the Safeco Field menu a hip retooling that the salty bugs found new, fervent popularity at the ballpark. (Also on the Safeco menu: fried oysters drizzled in hot sauce.)

Great Big Story met up with Manny Arce, the executive chef of Poquitos and visionary behind this culinary home run, to discuss the popularity of these crunchy critters. You can watch the video interview below:

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