New LEGO Sets Let You Recreate the Iconic Skylines of San Francisco and Paris

In 2016, LEGO began releasing architecture-themed sets that let toy-loving designers recreate the world’s most famous skylines in their own homes, beginning with re-creations of New York, Venice, and Berlin. And now, the company is adding Paris and San Francisco to the mix, according to Archinect.

The new LEGO Architecture kit for Paris will feature the Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe (both already available as stand-alone skyscraper kits) as well as the Louvre, the Tour Montparnasse, and other famous buildings. The LEGO San Francisco kit features the Golden Gate Bridge, the Transamerica Pyramid, Coit Tower, 555 California (formerly the Bank of America Center), Alcatraz Island, and the new Salesforce Tower, which recently became the city’s tallest building.

LEGO sets of the Paris and San Francisco skylines
LEGO

No doubt residents of both cities will have some gripes about which buildings were included and which were nixed from the kits. The Tour Montparnasse, in particular, was so deeply loathed upon its completion in the 1970s that the city of Paris promptly imposed a strict height restriction on buildings taller than 11 stories. Meanwhile, many San Francisco residents are still adjusting to the sight of the Salesforce Tower, which opened in 2018—it has been called “an atrocious spectacle,” its height described as “really offensive.”

You can check out all the kits from LEGO’s Architecture line here. Keep an eye out for the San Francisco and Paris versions starting early next year.

[h/t Architect]

San Francisco's Full House Home Is for Sale

The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of Full House.
The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of Full House.
The Agency

In the opening credits for the sitcom Full House, fans knew to expect a shot of the Tanners in a car, a view of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, and a quick glimpse of the red door of the family's home.

Fans have been visiting the real location of the San Francisco home used to shoot that iconic opening's exterior for years to take photos (and annoy the neighbors), but now someone has the opportunity to do more than lurk outside: TopTenRealEstateDeals.com reports that the home is currently on the market for $5.99 million.

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

The 3728-square-foot Victorian home, designed by Charles Lewis Hinkel and constructed in 1883, is located in San Francisco's desirable Lower Pacific Heights neighborhood—about a mile away from the famous "Painted Ladies" houses that are also featured in the show's opening credits.

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

Listed by The Agency, the home's interior looks much different than it appears on either the original show or the recent Fuller House sequel series (both of which were filmed in a studio). And it has recently undergone a major renovation, courtesy of Full House creator Jeff Franklin, who purchased the home for approximately $4 million in 2016 and went to work on updating it.

The kitchen of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

Instead of the open living room with a checked pattern couch and staircase, starchitect Richard Landry redesigned the home to be "sleek with soaring ceilings, skylights, and a masterful floor plan that allows for exceptional light and movement throughout," according to The Agency's property listing. "Sophistication and luxury combine to give you an ethereal residence that offers comfort, class, and opulent finishes."

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

The exterior looks a lot different than it did on the show, too—and features a less flashy door.

The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of 'Full House'
The Agency

If you still want the home despite the differences from the Tanners' abode, you can view the full listing here—and check out the full interior in the video below.

Updated for 2019.

Notre-Dame's Rooftop Bees Survived the Historic Fire

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Following the fire that tore through Notre-Dame in Paris on April 15, fire officials shared that the church's bell towers, stone facade, and many of its precious artifacts had escaped destruction. But the building's centuries-old features weren't the only things threatened by the blaze: The three beehives on the roof of the cathedral were also at risk. Now, CNN reports that the bees of Notre-Dame and their homes have survived the historic fire.

Notre-Dame's beehives are a relatively recent addition to the site: They were placed on the first-floor rooftop over the sacristy and beneath one of the rose windows in 2013. Nicolas Geant, the church's beekeeper, has been in charge of caring for the roughly 180,000 Buckfast bees that make honey used to feed the hungry.

Most people weren't thinking of bees as they watched Notre-Dame burn, but when the fire was put out, Geant immediately searched drone photographs for the hives. While the cathedral's wooden roof and spire were gone, the beehives remained, though there was no way of knowing if the bees had survived without having someone check in person. Geant has since talked to Notre-Dame's spokesperson and learned that bees are flying in and out of the hives, which means that at least some of them are alive.

Because the beehives were kept in a section 100 feet below the main roof where the fire was blazing, they didn't meet the same fate as the church's other wooden structures. The hives were likely polluted with smoke, but this wouldn't have hurt the insects: Bees don't have lungs, so smoke calms them rather than suffocates them.

Notre-Dame's bees may have survived to buzz another day, but some parts of the building weren't so lucky. France has vowed to rebuild it, with over $1 billion donated toward the cause so far.

[h/t CNN]

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