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This Assassin Only Kills If Its Victim Strikes First

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Letting your opponent land the first blow usually isn’t a surefire strategy for winning a fight, but for one insect predator, it’s the only way to come out on top.

As their name might suggest, assassin bugs are formidable killers. They’ve got a long proboscis that they use to stab prey, inject a tissue-liquefying toxic saliva and suck the pre-digested innards out for consumption. It’s like a harpoon, syringe, and straw all in one. 

When brute strength and poison aren’t enough to make the kill or get out of trouble with their own predators, the bugs have a few other tricks. One species wears its victims’ flesh as a disguise. When it’s finished with its meals, the assassin tosses the drained carcasses onto its sticky back, building a cloak of corpses that disguises the bug and protects it from spiders. 

Another species hunts spiders instead of hiding from them, and plucks the strands of their webs to mimic the vibrations of struggling prey. When the spider rushes over expecting a meal—Pow! Toxic proboscis sneak attack!—it becomes one instead. 

Scientists have just discovered a different sort of tactic used by the species Ptilocnemus lemur, which hunts ants. It also deceives its quarry, but uses one of its own legs as a lure and lets an ant attack it before going in for the kill.

The assassin bug begins by waving one of its bristly hind legs around to attract nearby ants. Unlike all the other lurer hunters that the researchers know of, the assassin doesn’t strike when an ant gets within range, or even when it touches or grasps the bait. It just waits.

Finally, when—and only when—the ant firmly grips the bug’s leg and either attempts to sting it or drag it away, the assassin leaps into action. With the ant still hanging on to its leg, P. lemur lifts itself up and swivels 180 degrees on its “knee” joint. Now its body is above the ant, and perfectly positioned to attack a weak point in the prey’s hardened exoskeleton—a soft membrane between the head and thorax. 

Proboscis goes in. Nutritious goo comes out. 

As the researchers, led by Australian ecologist Matthew Bulbert, watched, the assassins successfully killed 81 percent of the ants that fell for their trick. In almost 500 of these attacks, though, not one assassin bug died. 

Ants are dangerous game and adept insect killers themselves. Some species are also several times bigger than the assassin bugs. Using its own leg as bait with them would seem to put the assassin in harm’s way, but Bulbert and his team think the seemingly risky strategy of letting the ant bite first actually reduces the bug's chances of getting hurt. 

By presenting its leg and waiting until the ant latches on, the assassin has tricked the ant into concentrating all its offensive traits—its size, its jaws and its venom—onto one body part. Once the ant attempts to claim its meal, its entire arsenal is occupied, and it's unable to defend itself from an quick counter-attack that comes from above and behind its head. By taking a blow to the leg, the assassin bug turns the hunter into the hunted “unopposed and essentially risk free,” the researchers say. 

Crafty and effective as it is, the strategy also has some constraints. Only 2.5 percent of the ants that the researchers saw actually grabbed the assassin bugs’ legs. But the slim chance of an ant falling for the trick, Bulbert thinks, is offset by their size. The average ant that the assassins preyed on was one to two times larger than its killers, and could feasibly provide enough food to keep an assassin going through some lean times. In some cases, the ants were as much as five times bigger than the assassin, and the bug lost all contact with the ground when it flipped over on top of its prey and had to ride on the ant’s back until it died. 

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Animals
10 Notable Gestation Periods in the Animal Kingdom
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The gestation periods of the animal kingdom are varied and fascinating. Some clock in at just a few weeks, making any human green with envy, while others can last more than a year. Here are 10 notable gestation times for animals around the globe. The lesson? Be thankful that you’re not a pregnant elephant.

1. ELEPHANTS: 640-660 DAYS

Elephants are pregnant for a long time. Like really, really long. At an average of 95 weeks, the gestation period is more than double the length of a human pregnancy, so it shouldn't come as a shock that female elephants don't often have more than four offspring during their lifetimes. Who has the time?

2. HIPPOS: 8 MONTHS

A photo of a mother hippo and her baby in Uganda

Yes, it takes less time to make a hippopotamus than it takes to make a human.

3. GIRAFFE: 14-15 MONTHS

Baby giraffes can weigh more than 150 pounds and can be around 6 feet tall. Another fascinating tidbit: giraffes give birth standing up, so it's pretty normal for a baby to fall 6 feet to the ground.

4. KILLER WHALE: 17 MONTHS

There’s a reason for the long wait: after that 17 months, Baby Shamu emerges weighing anywhere from 265 to 353 pounds and measuring about 8.5 feet long. Yikes.

5. OPOSSUM: 12-13 DAYS

A baby opossum wrapped up in a blanket

Blink and you'll miss it: This is the shortest gestation period of any mammal in North America. But since the lifespan of an opossum is only two to four years, it makes sense.

6. GERBILS: 25 DAYS

Hey, they get off pretty easy.

7. GORILLAS: 8.5 MONTHS

It's not a huge surprise that their gestational periods are pretty similar to ours, right?

8. BLACK BEAR: 220 DAYS

A pair of black bear cubs

Also less than a human. Interestingly, cubs might only be 6 to 8 inches in length at birth and are completely hairless. 

9. PORCUPINE: 112 DAYS

This is the longest gestation period of any rodent. Thankfully for the mother, porcupine babies (a.k.a. porcupettes) are actually born with soft quills, and it's not until after birth that they harden up.

10. WALRUS: 15 MONTHS

Baby walruses? Kind of adorable. They certainly take their sweet time coming out, though.

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Animals
Goldfish Can Get Depressed, Too
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Don’t believe what Pixar is trying to sell you: Fish are not exactly brimming with personality. In aquariums, they tend to swim in circles, sucking up fragments of food and ducking around miniature treasure chests. To a layperson, fish don’t appear to possess concepts of happy, or sad, or anything in between—they just seem to exist.

This, researchers say, is not quite accurate. Speaking with The New York Times, Julian Pittman, a professor at the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences at Troy University, says that fish not only suffer from depression, they can be easily diagnosed. Zebrafish dropped into a new tank who linger at the bottom are probably sad; those who enthusiastically explore the upper half are not.

In Pittman’s studies, fish depression can be induced by getting them “drunk” on ethanol, then cutting off the supply, resulting in withdrawal. These fish mope around the tank floor until they’re given antidepressants, at which point they begin happily swimming near the surface again.

It’s impossible to correlate fish depression with that of a human, but Pittman believes the symptoms in fish—losing interest in exploring and eating—makes them viable candidates for exploring neuroscience and perhaps drawing conclusions that will be beneficial in the land-dwelling population.

In the meantime, you can help ward off fish blues by keeping them busy—having obstacles to swim through and intriguing areas of a tank to explore. Just like humans, staying active and engaged can boost their mental health.

[h/t The New York Times]

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