McDonald's Touchscreen Menus Are Covered in Poop, Report Finds

Joe Raedle, Getty Images
Joe Raedle, Getty Images

Would you like a side of poop with your McGriddle? If you use the touchscreen monitors at McDonald’s to order it, you might not have much of a choice. In a recent investigation by the UK newspaper Metro in collaboration with London Metropolitan University, researchers found fecal matter on every touchscreen they tested across eight different McDonald's restaurants.

They swabbed the surfaces of touchscreen devices that had recently been rolled out at eight McDonald’s locations in the UK (six in London and two in Birmingham). All of them contained coliforms, which are bacteria found in digestive tracts and feces. A sample from one of the screens also tested positive for Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteria that can cause skin infections, food poisoning, and occasionally more serious conditions like blood poisoning and toxic shock syndrome. Listeria and Proteus bacteria, which can also pose health threats, were detected on touchscreens in a few restaurants as well.

Paul Matewele, a microbiology lecturer at London Metropolitan University, said he was shocked to see such a high prevalence of gut and fecal bacteria on the touchscreens. Their use in fast food establishments is becoming increasingly common, but as this analysis shows, they do come with risks.

“Touchscreen technology is being used more and more in our daily lives but these results show people should not eat food straight after touching them. They are unhygienic and can spread disease,” Matewele told Metro. “Someone can be very careful about their own hygiene throughout the day but it could all be undone by using a touchscreen machine once.”

A McDonald’s spokesman said that the restaurants clean their self-order screens often throughout the day, but Matewele said the disinfectant must not be strong enough to kill all of the bacteria. However, as Newsweek notes, the sample size for the study was quite small. It only tested touchscreens at eight out of roughly 1300 McDonald's restaurants in the UK.

The more something is touched by multiple people, the more likely it is to harbor harmful germs. Beyond fast food joints, bacterial hotbeds include elevator buttons, office doors, and airport security bins. If you're going to be touching any of these surfaces, just be sure to wash your hands before eating. Big Macs included.

[h/t Metro]

Australian Man Claims His Former Boss Bullied Him with Farts, Wants $1.3 Million in Damages

iStock.com/AH86
iStock.com/AH86

The Victoria Court of Appeal in Australia had to consider setting an explosive precedent this week when it heard the case of a man who claimed he was bullied by the sound and smell of his supervisor’s farts.

David Hingst, an engineer working in Melbourne, filed a lawsuit seeking almost $1.3 million in damages from Construction Engineering, his employer from May 2008 until April 2009. During that time, Hingst claimed his supervisor, Greg Short, would enter Hingst’s windowless office several times a week to pass gas. Hingst alleged the farts were pointedly aimed in his direction or on his person, which Short purportedly found amusing.

Hingst didn’t and took to calling Short “Mr. Stinky,” which would seem to indicate a degree of levity on Hingst’s part. But the employee said he was tormented by the farting and argued in the lawsuit that it should be considered a form of assault.

The court disagreed, asserting that Short’s behavior did not rise to the level of bullying or harassment and that Construction Engineering had not been negligent. They did not rule on the facts of Short’s farting, which the defendant admitted he “may have done” once or twice. Hingst told reporters he plans to take his case to the High Court for one final appeal.

[h/t Houston Chronicle]

New York City is Fighting Fatbergs in Sewers with a New PSA Campaign

Chris Hondros, Getty Images
Chris Hondros, Getty Images

There are certain consequences to living in an age of convenience. Plastic straws are filling up landfills, prompting widespread bans and restrictions on their distribution. Now, New York City is turning its attention to an even more disgusting scourge: fatbergs.

A fatberg is a repulsive coagulation of things you shouldn't flush down the toilet, like bacon grease and so-called “flushable” sanitary wipes. They can be immense: One London fatberg grew to be 143 tons, becoming a cautionary tale for the rest of the world.

These mobile chunks of waste travel in sewers, creating significant blockages. The fatbergs can force untreated water into clean water sources and cause backups in residential plumbing.

With New York City currently spending $20 million annually on clearing these blockages, officials have decided to mount a public campaign cautioning residents against some of their bad plumbing habits. They have a new website admonishing people to abide by the “Four Ps” of flushing—poop, pee, puke and (toilet) paper are fine, while grease and wet wipes are not. Those should be thrown in the garbage.

While most people don’t have a problem directing their vomit and feces into a toilet without written instruction, there’s still a widely held belief that wet wipes are safe to flush. This is likely due to companies labeling them “flushable” on packaging, though the city’s anti-fatberg site insists that “flushable” simply means they won’t clog a toilet. Once it’s in the sewer system and mingles with grease, the wipes begin to contribute to a public health problem. The city removed almost 53,000 tons of debris from sewage treatment screens in 2017. Most of it consisted of the wipes.

With 8.6 million people in New York creating a substantial amount of waste, it’s easy to see why city management feels an urge to curb the problem. But no matter where you live, it’s a good idea to relegate flushes to bodily fluids and toilet paper only. Cooking crease should be allowed to cool, then put in a container and thrown away.

[h/t Slate]

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