Cake Central user serkyen
Cake Central user serkyen

17 Cakes Inspired By Real Buildings

Cake Central user serkyen
Cake Central user serkyen

For most of us, making a regular cake is tough enough—but these bakers created cakes inspired by buildings, and the results are incredible.

1. Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel

To celebrate their centennial, the folks at Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel commissioned Guittard Chocolate Company pastry chef Donald Wressell to create a replica of the hotel that weighed 4000 pounds. While many cakes of this magnitude are mostly made of inedible pieces covered in fondant, this impressive feat of cake engineering was enough to provide 15,000 slices to the celebrities, dignitaries, and other partygoers enjoying the anniversary party.

2. Burj Al Arab 

Dubai’s Burj Al Arab actually claims to be the most luxurious hotel in the world. When even cakes based on the destination include its vertigo-inducing tennis court, who are we to argue with their claims? This cakestravaganza was created by Cake Central user serkyen.

3. The Smithsonian

The Smithsonian celebrated its 150th anniversary in 1998 with nine cakes. The official birthday cake looked like the Smithsonian Castle—the location of the institution's administrative offices—and was created by Laureen Gauthier of the New England Culinary Institute.

4. Philadelphia Art Museum

While the cake might be missing the iconic “Rocky Steps” that lead up to the structure, Cake Central user tguegirl did a fantastic job recreating the buildings and fountain. The main building is made of vanilla cake with chocolate ganache and homemade caramel filling, while the side wings are vanilla cake with chocolate ganache and fresh raspberry filling.

5. The National Mall

Recreating some of the famous buildings and landmarks of the National Mall in Washington D.C. is a monumental task. Cake Central user bigcatz created this massive stretch of sweets for a woman who was relocating to the nation’s capital.

6. The Vatican

This Vatican cake by Annette’s Heavenly Cakes is something even the pope could appreciate.  

7. Wrigley Field

The Cake Boss was honored to help the Chicago Cubs celebrate the 100th anniversary of Wrigley Field by putting together this fondant-laden stadium. On the downside, a lot of fans were disappointed to see the whole 400 pound creation end up in the trash the same night.

8. Yankee Stadium

This cake by Enchanted Icing, which looks like the new Yankee Stadium, was created for Bar Mitzvah.

9. Alberta Legislature Building

Don’t worry, Canadians: We’ve got a few of your iconic buildings featured here too. For example, this delightful Alberta Legislature Building that Cake Couture Edible Art was commissioned to bake for the building’s 100th birthday.

10. Petit Seminaire de Quebec

Cake Central user patisseriejaja baked this replica of the roof portion of her husband’s college, Petit Seminaire de Quebec, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of his graduation from the school. The cake is chocolate with cream cheese filling, covered with chocolate ganache then with fondant. The bell tower is Rice Krispies treats covered with chocolate and then with fondant. It sounds like this thing is as delicious as it is beautiful.

11. The Leaning Tower of Pisa

Usually when a cake slouches, it’s because something terrible has happened, but Cake Central user CakeDiosa built the slouch into the design for this impressive Leaning Tower of Pisa cake that was made for a young girl heading off to Italy.

12. Patio De Los Arrayanes

Also known by its English name, The Court of the Myrtles, this beautiful patio area is one of the most famous icons of the Alhambra palace in Grenada. This cake version is made with gluten free almond and chocolate cakes, lemon butter cream, whipped ganache, berry glaze, fondant, gumpaste, and royal icing. It was created by Edible Incredible.

13. Haymarket Train Station

Cake Central user Mark_Mywords did an impressive job recreating this Edinburgh station for someone's birthday.

14. Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Marvin’s Cakes created this tribute for the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center’s 10th anniversary in 1999. The front attachment on the cake might look a little odd to some viewers, but if you take a look at pictures of the center, that is exactly what the research building looks like.

15. Chichen Itza Temple

Here’s a more ancient icon for your tasting pleasure. Made by Heavenly Bites Cakes, it was commissioned as a birthday present for a man from the Yucatan region who hadn’t been able to return home for a long time. There’s no denying that munching down on cake is a great way to get over homesickness.

16. Church of Holy Cross

This iconic Greek landmark on the island of Santorini is brought to life in this delicious dessert by Cake Central user anxeli.

17. Sydney Opera House

Want to make the Sydney Opera House in gum paste? Sprinkle Bakes walks you through a lot of her creative process.

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Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Silja Lena Løken / Statens vegvesen
Norway Opens Another Spectacular Roadside Bathroom
Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Silja Lena Løken / Statens vegvesen
Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Silja Lena Løken / Statens vegvesen

Norway’s National Tourist Routes will change how you think about rest stops. As part of a decades-long program, the Norwegian government has been hiring architects and designers to create beautiful roadside lookouts, bathrooms, and other amenities for travelers along 18 scenic highways throughout the country. One of the latest of the projects unveiled, spotted by Dezeen, is a glitzy restroom located on the Arctic island of Andøya in northern Norway.

The facility, designed by the Oslo-based Morfeus Arkitekter, is located near a rock formation called Bukkekjerka, once used as a sacrificial site by the indigenous Sami people. The angular concrete and steel structure is designed to fit in with the jagged mountains that surround it.

The mirrored exterior wall of the bathroom serves a dual purpose. On the one hand, it reflects the scenery around the building, helping it blend into the landscape. But it also has a hidden feature. It’s a one-way mirror, allowing those inside the restroom to have a private view out over the ocean or back into the mountains while they pee.

The newly landscaped rest area near the bathroom will serve as an event space in the future. The Bukkekjerka site is already home to an annual open-air church service, and with the new construction, the space will also be used for weddings and other events. Because this is the Arctic Circle, though, the restroom is only open in the late spring and summer, closing from October to May. Check it out in the photos below.

A bathroom nestled in a hilly landscape
Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Hugo Fagermo / Statens vegvesen

The mirrored facade of a rest stop reflects concrete steps leading down a pathway.
Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Hugo Fagermo / Statens vegvesen

A person stands outside the bathroom's reflective wall.
Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Hugo Fagermo / Statens vegvesen

A wide view of a rest stop at the base of a coastal mountain
Morfeus Arkitekter. Photo: Trine Kanter Zerwekh / Statens vegvesen

[h/t Dezeen]

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Snøhetta
Norway's New Hotel in the Arctic Circle Will Produce More Energy Than It Uses
Snøhetta
Snøhetta

A new hotel coming to Norway’s section of the Arctic Circle will be more than just a place to stay for a stunning fjord view. The Svart hotel, which is being billed as the world’s first "energy-positive" hotel, is designed to “set a new standard in sustainable travel,” according to Robb Report.

Built by a tourism company called Arctic Adventure Norway and designed by Snøhetta, an international architecture firm headquartered in Oslo, it’s one of the first buildings created according to the standards of Powerhouse, a coalition of firms (including Snøhetta) devoted to putting up buildings that will produce more power over the course of 60 years than they take to build, run, and eventually demolish. It will be located on a fjord at the base of Svartisen, one of the largest glaciers on Norway’s mainland and part of Saltfjellet-Svartisen National Park.

A hotel stretches out above the water of a fjord.
Snøhetta

The design of the hotel is geared toward making the facility as energy-efficient as possible. The architects mapped how the Sun shines through the mountains throughout the year to come up with the circular structure. When the Sun is high in the winter, the terraces outside the rooms provide shadows that reduce the need for air conditioning, while the windows are angled to catch the low winter Sun, keeping the building warm during cold Arctic winters. In total, it is expected to use 85 percent less energy than a traditional hotel.

The sun reflects off the roof of a hotel at the base of a glacier on a sunny day.
Snøhetta

Svart will also produce its own energy through rooftop solar panels, though it won’t have excess energy on hand year-round. Since it’s located in the Arctic Circle, the hotel will have an abundance of sunlight during the summer, at which point it will sell its excess energy to the local electricity grid. In the winter, when it’s too dark for solar energy production, the hotel will buy energy back from the grid. Over the course of the year, it will still produce more energy than it uses, and over time, it will eventually produce enough excess energy to offset the energy that was used to build the structure (including the creation of the building materials).

“Building in such a precious environment comes with some clear obligations in terms of preserving the natural beauty and the fauna and flora of the site,” Snøhetta co-founder Kjetil Trædal Thorsen explains in the firm’s description of the design. “Building an energy-positive and low-impact hotel is an essential factor to create a sustainable tourist destination respecting the unique features” of the area.

Svart is set to open in 2021.

[h/t Robb Report]

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