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9 Weird Dance Crazes From '90s TV Shows

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Nothing says the '90s like a cheesy dance craze. These dances will bring back some memories—feel free to dance along.

1. "The Bartman" from The Simpsons

From the album The Simpsons Sing the Blues, “Do The Bartman” and its accompanying dance was an international hit in 1990. Incredibly, Michael Jackson actually co-wrote the song with record producer Bryan Loren. Jackson was a die-hard fan of The Simpsons and Bart, but didn’t receive credit for the song because he was under contract with a competing record label. Although it wasn’t officially released as a single in the United States, “Do The Bartman” was a chart-topping hit in Australia and the United Kingdom.

Pixar director Brad Bird directed the music video for “Do The Bartman,” which received a nomination during the 1991 MTV Video Music Awards.

2. "The Sprain" from Saved By The Bell

In the episode “Dancing to the Max,” the kids at Bayside High School prepare for a dance competition. Lisa Turtle hurts her ankle, but she joins forces with Samuel “Screech” Powers, battles through the pain, and wins the competition with a new dance called "The Sprain."

3. "The Carlton" from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

"The Carlton" became a staple of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air when it was introduced in the sitcom’s third season. Alfonso Ribeiro combined Courteney Cox’s dance from Bruce Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark” music video, Eddie Murphy’s “white man dance,” and the Tom Jones hit “It’s Not Unusual” to create this wildly popular dance that still can bring the house down.

4. "The Routine" from Friends

In the episode “The One with the Routine,” Ross and Monica re-create a dance from their childhood to get on TV during a New Year’s Eve broadcast.

5. "The Urkel" from Family Matters

In 1991, everyone's favorite wacky neighbor introduced "The Urkel" during season two of Family Matters. Like "The Bartman," this dance craze was so popular it inspired T-shirts and a hit single.

"The Urkel" even crossed over to fellow ABC sitcom Step by Step in the episode “The Dance” later that year. Urkel makes a cameo appearance as Al’s (Christine Lakin) date to a middle school dance.

6. "The Elaine" from Seinfeld

“Sweet Fancy Moses!” This dance was introduced in the season eight episode “The Little Kicks” when Elaine Benes tries to get the party started at an office function. It combines a series of pointed thumbs, little kicks, and body convulsions that has become a go-to dance for the rhythmless.

7. "The Alley Cat" from Mad About You

In the episode “The Wedding Affair” from Mad About You's first season, Paul and Jamie try to liven up a wedding reception with "The Alley Cat" line dance.

8. "Dancing Baby" from Ally McBeal

The Dancing Baby was one of the Internet's first memes. It was launched in 1996 and gained widespread attention when it appeared on Ally McBeal a few years later in 1998. Featured in the episode “Cro-Magnon,” Ally McBeal starts fantasizing about a baby dancing around her apartment to the song “Hooked on a Feeling.”

9. "Apache (Jump On It)" from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

In addition to "The Carlton," Will Smith and Alfonso Ribeiro created the "Jump On It" dance when they were goofing around on the set of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. The dance was introduced during the sitcom’s sixth season and eventually became a way for Smith and Ribeiro to warm up before shooting a new episode.

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Artist Makes Colorful Prints From 1990s VHS Tapes

A collection of old VHS tapes offers endless crafting possibilities. You can use them to make bird houses, shelving units, or, if you’re London-based artist Dieter Ashton, screen prints from the physical tape itself.

As Co.Design reports, the recent London College of Communication graduate was originally intrigued by the art on the cover of old VHS and cassette tapes. He planned to digitally edit them as part of a new art project, but later realized that working with the ribbons of tape inside was much more interesting.

To make a print, Ashton unravels the film from cassettes and VHS tapes collected from his parents' home. He lets the strips fall randomly then presses them into tight, tangled arrangements with the screen. The piece is then brought to life with vibrant patterns and colors.

Ashton has started playing with ways to incorporate themes and motifs from the films he's repurposing into his artwork. If the movie behind one of his creations isn’t immediately obvious, you can always refer to its title. His pieces are named after movies like Backdraft, Under Siege, and that direct-to-video Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen classic Passport to Paris.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Dieter Ashton

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The Hole Story: A History of Skee-Ball
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In the early 1900s, the thing Joseph Fourestier Simpson desired most was to create something people respected. A career hustler—real estate agent, cash register salesman, and railroad clerk were just a few of the many jobs he held—Simpson longed to invent something he could patent that would have lasting appeal.

A handful of his inventions made minor waves: He perfected an egg crate that could protect shells during bumpy transportation routes, and created a new kind of trunk clasp that kept luggage tightly shut. None of it made him rich, but one invention in particular would at least gain him some national recognition. It was a ramp that could be set up in arcades and amusement parks, a kind of modified form of bowling that allowed players to lob a wooden ball over a bump and into a hole with a pre-assigned point value. He dubbed it Skee-Ball after the skee (ski) hills—and especially the ski jumps—that were then becoming popular in American culture.

Simpson filed for a patent in 1907 and received it in 1908. Later, he would see his Skee-Ball become a popular and pervasive attraction along the Atlantic City Boardwalk, in Philadelphia, and across the country. But Simpson wouldn’t see any profit from it. In fact, he'd suffer financial ruin. Even worse, history would become muddled to the point where most people wouldn’t even realize it was Simpson who had invented it.

Historic Images - Lancashire via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Up until recently, it was common for accounts of Skee-Ball’s history to name Princeton University alumnus J. Dickinson Este as the man behind the game. As the story goes, Este was motivated to find an inventive birthday gift for his son in 1909 and decided to craft an alley for a small, handheld ball using lumber he had obtained from his father’s successful wood business, and Skee-Ball was born.

The problem? Virtually none of it appears to be true. According to Thaddeus Cooper and Kevin Kreitman, co-authors of the recently-released Seeking Redemption: The Real Story of the Beautiful Game of Skee-Ball, Este was the beneficiary of Simpson’s innovation, but not the innovator. The authors cite their five years of research into the game’s origins and a key discovery at New Jersey's Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society, where, among other papers, Simpson’s 1908 patent for the machine resides.

“The history has become really muddled, at least on the internet,” Cooper tells Mental Floss. “Este, for one thing, didn’t have a son in 1909. He had twin daughters, much later on.”

Accounts seem to have conflated two different events: Simpson’s invention and Este’s later acquisition of the Skee-Ball business. After Simpson noticed the amusements industry taking off, he invented and patented the device; he and his partners, John Harper and William Nice, started marketing it to potential operators. None of the men were marketers, however, and they were never quite able to adopt the kind of salesmanship nor the resources needed to make Skee-Ball a household term. “It was your typical start-up problem,” Kreitman says. “They had the idea but not the money.”

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Simpson’s pockets ran dry; by 1911, he had even lost his house and was staying with friends. Este, who had been playing and enjoying the game in Philadelphia, rented some space near Princeton and installed a handful of alleys. When he saw that students were tripping over themselves to play, he decided to make a substantial investment—about $30,000 to $50,000 in today’s dollars—in the game. By 1914, he owned all rights and began an aggressive marketing effort using his wealthy family’s connections in the Pennsylvania news media.

“It was aggressive,” Cooper says. “You’d see ads with actual photographs, which was rare for amusement ads at the time. The copy would say something like, ‘Everybody is playing. Where have you been?’”

The hard sell worked. Soon, outlets like The New York Times were taking notice of the Skee-Ball craze spreading from the east coast. Co-ed tournaments sprung up; in Atlantic City, people seemed to be enjoying it a little too much, with the city clamping down on “noisy amusements” operating on Sundays.

Still, Skee-Ball was becoming a hit, thanks in part to a key design change prompted during the Depression. Originally built with a 32- to 36-foot-long ramp, the machines were cleaved in half so operators could fit the alleys into smaller, more affordable venues (10 feet is now the standard length). Not having to launch the ball such a long distance helped attract more kids to the game, who—along with adults—were plunking down an endless stream of nickels so they could get their nine balls and attempt to sink them. Prizes or tickets redeemable for prizes would be awarded to winners.

By this point, Este had exited the amusements business, selling his interest to his partners. By 1935, Skee-Ball was under the Wurlitzer umbrella. The jukebox maker had realized that Simpson’s device was outperforming their music libraries in several locations.

“They thought they would make a killing,” Kreitman tells Mental Floss. “They ramped up production and produced 5000 machines in 1937 alone.”

What Wurlitzer didn’t quite realize was that the machines made in the decades prior were so durable that they rarely needed replacing. “It took them about seven years to sell their stock,” Kreitman says.

Ownership changed again in 1945, when the Philadelphia Toboggan Company purchased Skee-Ball, and didn’t pass to other hands until 1985, when a businessman named Joe Sladek purchased it. Each owner has pursued Skee-Ball as a result of its considerable longevity and appeal, even though some local administrations have occasionally taken issue with the devices and their loose flirtation with gambling.

“I know at some point in Chicago some cops came in and chopped Skee-Ball machines apart with axes, then tossed them out the back door,” Cooper says.

Ryan Basilio via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Remarkably, Skee-Ball has remained largely unchanged for the past 110 years. Cooper says that Simpson’s early concept designs strongly resemble today's machines. It’s still a very analog experience: Pitch the ball, and hope you hit a high-scoring target.

In 2016, Skee-Ball changed hands once more, this time to the Bay-Tek company. It’s estimated that more than 125,000 machines are in operation today, with many locations organizing loose tournaments. Brewskee-Ball has made a name for itself as a leading competition league. Players can—and usually do—drink while playing, with winners receiving a cream-colored jacket and trophy as proof of their Skee-Ball prowess. Like roller derby participants, they favor colorful player names like Brewbacca and Monica LewinSkee and play during “skeesons.” (Back in March, Brewbacca was the focus of an ABC News digital feature.)

While some machines dating back to the 1940s are still in operation in a few locations, Cooper says he and Kreitman have yet to come across any of the original models from either Simpson or Este.

Simpson died in 1930, living long enough to see Skee-Ball become a popular pastime but unable to reap the financial rewards he had worked so hard to try and achieve.

“He was 57 when he invented it,” Kreitman says. “He saw the success, but never saw the financial benefits.”

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