The Philippines Is Spending $14 Billion to Build a 'Pollution-Free' City Near Manila

iStock.com/Nikada
iStock.com/Nikada

Manila has an air pollution problem. The capital of the Philippines, home to 1.8 million people, has been called one of the worst cities in the world for traffic jams—and its reliance on cars has only exacerbated the problem.

So the country decided to start from scratch and create its own utopia. As Business Insider reports, the country plans to spend $14 billion to build a new, “pollution-free” city. Dubbed New Clark City, this “twin city” to Manila will be located about 75 miles away from the capital. The hope is that 2 million city dwellers will be persuaded to pick up and move there, which would also help ease congestion in Manila.

New Clark will reportedly be built over a 30-year period, and when it's done it will be larger than Manhattan. It will be divided into five districts designed to serve different purposes: government, recreation, business, education, and agriculture. However, two-thirds of the land will be devoted to parks, farmland, and green space.

The plans also call for innovative technologies to be rolled out in New Clark, including drones, self-driving electric cars, and eco-friendly methods of conserving water and energy. As CNN reports, the city will be situated at a higher elevation than Manila in order to safeguard it from environmental disasters like typhoons and floods.

The project is being developed by BCDA Group, a local government-owned corporation, and Surbana Jurong, a Singaporean government-owned consultancy company. They plan to build a sports complex, government buildings, and housing units for government employees before the Southeast Asian Games kick off in the Philippines in December 2019.

It’s certainly ambitious, but as Business Insider points out, there will likely be challenges. The country “struggles with economic development,” it notes, and similar projects in China have failed and turned into ghost cities instead.

[h/t Business Insider]

Environmental Group Lets You Kayak European Waterways for Free in Exchange for Picking Up Trash

iStock/levers2007
iStock/levers2007

Between airfare, hotels, and dining out, not every traveler to Europe has room in their budget for a kayaking tour. GreenKayak, an environmental organization based out of Denmark, offers tourists and locals a way to explore waterways in some European countries for free—they just have to be comfortable with picking up some trash along the way.

As Lifehacker reports, GreenKayak launched its pollution-fighting initiative in April 2017. The concept is simple: Volunteers receive free kayak rentals in exchange for using the trip as a chance to beautify their surroundings. Two hours of free kayaking time comes with a paddle, a life vest, a trash-grabber, and a garbage pail. In the past two years, GreenKayakers have collected close to 24,000 pounds of trash from lakes, canals, and rivers in Europe.

GreenKayak started its environmental project in Denmark, a country that's famous for its picturesque waterways. The initiative has since expanded to cities in Ireland, Germany, Sweden, and Norway. Anyone interested in taking a free boat tour and making the world a cleaner place can book a kayak for up to two people through GreenKayak's website.

Kayaking isn't the only way people can clean up polluted waterways in Europe. Amsterdam is home to the Plastic Whale: an open-air boat made from recycled material on which tourists can "fish" for discarded trash.

[h/t Lifehacker]

2624-Year-Old Cypress Tree Discovered in North Carolina Swamp

iStock/earleliason
iStock/earleliason

National Love a Tree Day on May 16 is a day to appreciate all the world's trees, but a bald cypress recently identified in North Carolina is especially deserving of recognition. As Live Science reports, scientists date the tree to 2624 years old, making it one the oldest living non-clonal trees on Earth.

For their study, recently published in the journal Environmental Research Communications, a team of researchers studied the rings of trees in North Carolina's Black River swampland to learn more about climate history in the eastern United States. Bald cypresses are known to have impressive lifespans, but after analyzing specimens in the Black River's Three Sisters Swamp, an area that's notable for its long-lived trees, the scientists discovered that cypresses can grow to be even older than previously believed. The 2624-year-old cypress tree they found predates the Great Wall of China and the Roman Empire. Other remarkably old trees, including a 2088-year-old cypress, were also identified in the same grove.

The North Carolina cypresses are old, but there are other types of trees that can grow to be much older. Clonal tress are genetically identical plants that reproduce asexually from a single ancestor. Old Tjikko, a clonal tree in Sweden, has a root system that dates back 9550 years.

Despite all that North Carolina's bald cypress trees have endured, their lives are under threat. The swamp where the 2624-year-old tree stands is located just 6.5 feet above sea level, which means that floods driven by climate change could damage its habitat. And though the grove is in a protected area, industrial runoff and logging that's happening nearby could impact the trees' health. North Carolina is considering establishing a Black River State Park where the trees grow to further protect the ancient natural wonders.

[h/t Live Science]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER