The Most-Googled Thanksgiving Recipe in Each State

iStock.com/VeselovaElena
iStock.com/VeselovaElena

Each year when November rolls around, novice cooks start frantically searching for answers to all their turkey-related questions. When should it be thawed? Is an oven or deep fryer better? What’s the best recipe? Hotlines like Butterball’s Turkey Talk-Line get flooded with hundreds of thousands of calls each holiday season.

So it’s no surprise that turkey was the most-Googled Thanksgiving dish across America last November, according to Satelliteinternet.com’s new analysis of food-related Google searches. But not every cook was looking for turkey advice last Thanksgiving. There was plenty of regional variation in the recipes people were searching for, as the map below shows.

Green bean and corn casseroles were the next most-searched items after turkey last year, having amassed a particularly large fan base in the Midwest. Other searches are more unique. Vermonters seem to love ambrosia salad, while Louisianans can be expected to serve up a lot of cornbread dressing. Meanwhile, residents of Maryland, Virginia, Mississippi, and Illinois wanted to know how to make a copycat version of Popeyes Cajun turkey. (If you happen to be one of them, you can view a recipe here.)

A color-coded map of the U.S.
Satelliteinternet.com

Meanwhile, in Idaho and Utah, Jell-O is apparently a very popular dish in the month of November. Perhaps people were whipping up something like Allrecipe.com's Thanksgiving Jell-O Salad, which is made from crushed pineapple, cottage cheese, lime Jell-O, and whipped topping.

Previous analyses have found even more variation in what Americans eat on Thanksgiving. Back in 2014, The New York Times looked into the most uniquely popular Thanksgiving dish in each state, excluding common dishes like turkey. Deer jerky, sweet potato dumplings, asparagus casserole, turkey enchiladas, and something called frog eye salad were a few of the top search results.

Those dishes aren’t nearly as weird as some of the Thanksgiving dishes that were served up several decades ago, though. Creamed onions, cranberry salad with mayonnaise, and jellied turkey-vegetable salad are among some of the more off-putting vintage recipes we’ve dug up.

Searching for a New Gig? The Cities With the Highest Job Growth in Each State, Mapped

iStock/gerenme
iStock/gerenme

Want to go where the jobs are? You don't necessarily need to move all the way across the country. A new analysis spotted by Thrillist identifies the city in each state where the most jobs have been created over the last five years, and some of the places with the biggest growth may surprise you.

The map below comes from the cost information site How Much, which used employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to track job growth between 2013 and 2018 in 381 metropolitan areas.

Overall, smaller or mid-sized cities seem to be where business is booming. In Austin, Texas, where job growth stands at 18.4 percent, the main driver of high-wage jobs recently has been the professional and business service sectors, according to Forbes. Similarly, Reno, Nevada, saw an 18 percent spike in jobs, largely due to growth in the city’s manufacturing, information, and business service industries.

The highest job growth, however, is happening in Louisiana. Since 2013, Lake Charles, Louisiana, has seen a 28.3 percent spike in job creation, the highest of any city in the country. (By comparison, New York City's job growth was just 5.3 percent.) The boom hasn't produced gains across all industries, though. Most job growth in Lake Charles over the last five years has occurred in the mining, logging, and construction industries, Thrillist notes. A planned $872 million power plant will likely bring even more jobs to the area in the future.

As How Much explains, more jobs don't necessarily mean higher wages. Five of the country's top 10 metro areas for job growth have median household incomes under $60,000. For instance, Elkhart, Indiana, which is known for manufacturing and supplying RVs, currently has one of the country's highest job growth rates, at 24 percent, but its median household income is only $58,960. Of the top job-growth cities, Austin's median household income is the highest, at $73,800.

Check out the How Much map below to see where new jobs are being added in your state, and explore the full data here.

A map of the U.S. showing the top city for job growth in each state
How Much

[h/t Thrillist]

Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant

Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas.

And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work.

You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

This article originally ran in 2015.

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