Architect Creates Renderings of Frank Lloyd Wright Designs That Were Never Built

Frank Lloyd Wright designed more than a thousand works in his lifetime, but hundreds of his ideas were never built. One of those was the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective, a tourist attraction commissioned in 1924. Now, thanks to new renderings by Spanish architect David Romero, you can get a better idea of what the proposed project might have looked like had it been completed, as Curbed reports.

Romero is the creator of Hooked on the Past, a project in which he translates plans for Frank Lloyd Wright's unbuilt designs into photorealistic scale renderings. He imports data and plans Wright drew up for the projects into modern modeling software in order to create the most accurate renderings possible of what these structures would have looked like. For the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective images, he collaborated with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, which recently ran the images in its magazine, Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly.

A spiraling building on top of a mountain
David Romero

Intended to stand atop Sugarloaf Mountain in Maryland’s Blue Ridge Mountains, the plan for the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective called for a planetarium and restaurant to accompany a scenic overlook. Its developer, wealthy Chicago businessman Gordon Strong, envisioned it as a destination where families would drive for the day from Baltimore and Washington, D.C. The design shifted substantially from draft to draft. In some, it called for a dance hall instead of a planetarium; in another, a theater. He also designed in waterfalls, pedestrian paths, bridges, an aquarium, and a car showroom.

A rendering of a pedestrian bridge
The unbuilt Butterfly Wing Bridge
David Romero

Above all, it was to be a destination for drivers, as the name suggests, and visitors would have driven up to park along its spiral structure—similar to the one that would later come to life in the design of the Guggenheim museum, which Romero looked to as inspiration while translating Wright's failed plans into 3D renderings.

A rendering of a spiral-shaped building at night
David Romero

Romero also painstakingly researched the context and location of the building, including adding era-appropriate cars, traces of rain and dirt on the building, and other details in order to bring the project to life. As a result, at times it can be hard to tell these are illustrations rather than stylized photographs.

Romero has also created similarly detailed renderings of other unbuilt or demolished Frank Lloyd Wright projects, including ones that have long since been destroyed, like the demolished Larkin Administration Building in Buffalo, New York and the burned-down Rose Pauson House in Arizona. You can see more here.

[h/t Curbed]

San Francisco's Full House Home Is for Sale

The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of Full House.
The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of Full House.
The Agency

In the opening credits for the sitcom Full House, fans knew to expect a shot of the Tanners in a car, a view of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, and a quick glimpse of the red door of the family's home.

Fans have been visiting the real location of the San Francisco home used to shoot that iconic opening's exterior for years to take photos (and annoy the neighbors), but now someone has the opportunity to do more than lurk outside: TopTenRealEstateDeals.com reports that the home is currently on the market for $5.99 million.

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

The 3728-square-foot Victorian home, designed by Charles Lewis Hinkel and constructed in 1883, is located in San Francisco's desirable Lower Pacific Heights neighborhood—about a mile away from the famous "Painted Ladies" houses that are also featured in the show's opening credits.

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

Listed by The Agency, the home's interior looks much different than it appears on either the original show or the recent Fuller House sequel series (both of which were filmed in a studio). And it has recently undergone a major renovation, courtesy of Full House creator Jeff Franklin, who purchased the home for approximately $4 million in 2016 and went to work on updating it.

The kitchen of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

Instead of the open living room with a checked pattern couch and staircase, starchitect Richard Landry redesigned the home to be "sleek with soaring ceilings, skylights, and a masterful floor plan that allows for exceptional light and movement throughout," according to The Agency's property listing. "Sophistication and luxury combine to give you an ethereal residence that offers comfort, class, and opulent finishes."

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

The exterior looks a lot different than it did on the show, too—and features a less flashy door.

The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of 'Full House'
The Agency

If you still want the home despite the differences from the Tanners' abode, you can view the full listing here—and check out the full interior in the video below.

Updated for 2019.

Notre-Dame's Rooftop Bees Survived the Historic Fire

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Following the fire that tore through Notre-Dame in Paris on April 15, fire officials shared that the church's bell towers, stone facade, and many of its precious artifacts had escaped destruction. But the building's centuries-old features weren't the only things threatened by the blaze: The three beehives on the roof of the cathedral were also at risk. Now, CNN reports that the bees of Notre-Dame and their homes have survived the historic fire.

Notre-Dame's beehives are a relatively recent addition to the site: They were placed on the first-floor rooftop over the sacristy and beneath one of the rose windows in 2013. Nicolas Geant, the church's beekeeper, has been in charge of caring for the roughly 180,000 Buckfast bees that make honey used to feed the hungry.

Most people weren't thinking of bees as they watched Notre-Dame burn, but when the fire was put out, Geant immediately searched drone photographs for the hives. While the cathedral's wooden roof and spire were gone, the beehives remained, though there was no way of knowing if the bees had survived without having someone check in person. Geant has since talked to Notre-Dame's spokesperson and learned that bees are flying in and out of the hives, which means that at least some of them are alive.

Because the beehives were kept in a section 100 feet below the main roof where the fire was blazing, they didn't meet the same fate as the church's other wooden structures. The hives were likely polluted with smoke, but this wouldn't have hurt the insects: Bees don't have lungs, so smoke calms them rather than suffocates them.

Notre-Dame's bees may have survived to buzz another day, but some parts of the building weren't so lucky. France has vowed to rebuild it, with over $1 billion donated toward the cause so far.

[h/t CNN]

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