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YouTube / The Royal Institution

How Bubbles May Help Treat Cancer

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YouTube / The Royal Institution

For seven years, Dr. Eleanor Stride has been developing a new way to deliver drugs: injecting tiny bubbles. By containing medicine within a "micro-bubble" and targeting where the bubbles go (some are magnetic, and can thus be literally dragged around), the medicine's release can be highly targeted. This approach has the potential to dramatically reduce the destruction caused by chemotherapy, by targeting the toxic effects of the drug to just the tumor, rather than the body as a whole.

In this short video, Stride explains her research, and we see some beautiful slow-motion footage of bubbles. More like this, please:

For more technical detail, here's a 10-minute interview with Dr. Stride:

And if you'd rather just see amazing bubble footage, here's the Slow Mo Guys bursting bubbles at 18,000 frames per second:

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Belly Flop Physics 101: The Science Behind the Sting
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iStock

Belly flops are the least-dignified—yet most painful—way of making a serious splash at the pool. Rarely do they result in serious physical injury, but if you’re wondering why an elegant swan dive feels better for your body than falling stomach-first into the water, you can learn the laws of physics that turn your soft torso a tender pink by watching the SciShow’s video below.

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What's the Saltiest Water in the World?
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iStock // lucamato

Saltwater is common around the world—indeed, salty oceans cover more than two-thirds of the globe. Typical saltwater found in our oceans is about 3.5% salt by weight. But in some areas, we find naturally occurring saltwater that's far saltier. The saltiest water yet discovered is more than 12 times saltier than typical seawater.

Gaet’ale is a pond in Ethiopia which currently holds the record as the most saline water body on Earth. The water in that pond is 43.3% dissolved solids by weight—most of that being salt. This kind of water is called hypersaline for its extreme salt concentration.

In the video below, Professor Martyn Poliakoff explains this natural phenomenon—why it's so salty, how the temperature of the pond affects its salinity, and even why this particular saltwater has a yellow tint. Enjoy:

For the paper Poliakoff describes, check out this abstract.

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