9 Celebrities Who Have Written Comic Books

Dia Dipasupil, Getty Images
Dia Dipasupil, Getty Images

A career onscreen or in music doesn't necessarily translate to talent with a pen, but the comic book industry is a great place for celebrities to indulge their creative ideas or cut their teeth as writers. Here are just a few of the names that have graced comic covers to the surprise of everyone.

1. MARK HAMILL

Mark Hamill attends the premiere of Disney Pictures and Lucasfilm's 'Solo: A Star Wars Story' at the El Capitan Theatre on May 10, 2018 in Los Angeles, California
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

If you don't know Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker, you know him as the voice of the Joker from the DC Animated Universe. And if you don't know him from that, then you know him as the proprietor of one of the greatest Twitter feeds known to man. But if you don't know him from any of those place, you probably remember him as the guy who wrote The Black Pearl for Dark Horse.

2. RASHIDA JONES

Rashida Jones is a student of the Carrie Fisher school of being beloved onscreen, but doing far more behind the scenes than anyone realizes. The former Parks and Recreation star is a prolific screenwriter and editor who made her comic book debut with Frenemy of the State under the independent Oni Press label.

The story, which follows a CIA agent who uses the guise of a tabloid celebrity to complete her missions, was optioned for a movie deal by Universal in 2009. While Jones is on board to write the script, there's been no real development news on the project in the last decade.

3. AND 4. BILL HADER AND SETH MEYERS

Executive producer/actors Bill Hader and Seth Meyers speak onstage during the 'Documentary Now!' panel discussion at the AMC/IFC Networks portion of the 2015 Summer TCA Tour at The Beverly Hilton Hotel
Frederick M. Brown, Getty Images

This Saturday Night Live dream team may have parted ways on television back in 2013, but they're remained good friends and regular collaborators. In 2009, the pair teamed up to make a Marvel one-shot, Spider-Man: The Short Halloween.

A riff on Batman: The Long Halloween, the story they wrote involved Spider-man being knocked out of commission in a Greenwich Village costume parade, leaving a drunk reveler in a Spider-man costume to take his place.

5. WILLIAM SHATNER

Even since Star Trek star ​William Shatner wrote the TekWar novels, he has made it a hobby to personally expand the franchise and universe through more books, television movies, a trading card game, and, yes, a comic book tie-in series that Shatner himself penned. It's about as crazy as a comic written by William Shatner sounds.

6. JOHN CLEESE

John Cleese attends the 55th Rose d'Or Award at Axica-Kongress- und Tagungszentrum on September 13, 2016 in Berlin, Germany
Clemens Bilan, Getty Images

If there's one thing that Brits do better than any other culture, it's cultural self-deprecation. The entire style of British comedy is based squarely on disillusionment with their own environment and an inability to take any of it all too seriously—an attitude that was clearly evident in the rambunctious lads from Monty Python.

John Cleese, a core member of the group, brought this style and sense of humor to Superman: True Brit, a comic that pondered what Superman might be like if his rocket had landed in the British countryside instead of rural Kansas. The result: Superman rarely uses his powers because "What would the neighbors think?"

7. KEVIN SMITH

Clerks creator Kevin ​Smith has never made a secret of his love of the comic world, which is part of what has helped him become a geek culture icon. Using both his celebrity status and legitimate writing talents, Smith has had a prolific career in comics both as a regular and guest writer.

The Fatman on Batman host's biggest accolades include Batman: The Widening Gyre, Batman '66 Meets the Green Hornet, and a slew of titles tying into his View Askewniverse including the fabled Bluntman and Chronic series.

8. GERARD WAY

Gerard Way of My Chemical Romance performs at Roseland Ballroom on December 3, 2010 in New York City
Cory Schwartz, Getty Images

Gerard Way, former lead singer for My Chemical Romance, has had his hands in the comic book industry since 1993, when he was credited with the creation and writing of the short-lived On Raven's Wings. He wouldn't try his hand at the medium again until 2007, when he released the critically-acclaimed The Umbrella Academy series.

After his big break in the industry wheelhouse, Way has been courted by DC and Vertigo and, in 2014, began writing for Marvel's Edge of the Spider-Verse.

9. PHIL "CM PUNK" BROOKS

Phil "CM Punk" Brooks may have burned all his bridges with the WWE, but he's still one of the most accomplished and experienced wrestlers in the world. With professional wrestling essentially being live-action comics, it makes sense that he'd be able to translate his in-ring mic skills to a side job writing comics.

He penned 2015's Thor Annual #1, where Loki makes the God of Thunder wrestle Hulk in a luchador mask, and has continued to periodically partner with Marvel since.

More Than 14,000 Marvel Fans Have Signed a Petition to Make Danny DeVito the New Wolverine

Stuart C. Wilson, Getty Images
Stuart C. Wilson, Getty Images

When you think of who could possibly take on the role of a character as iconic as Wolverine from the X-Men, Danny DeVito probably isn't the first actor you'd land on. But there are thousands of MCU fans who would disagree. A new petition to name the It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia actor as Hugh Jackman's successor is getting a lot of traction, as NME reports.

The Change.org petition, which was set up with a goal of getting 15,000 signatures, already has more than 14,220 supporters. The pitch for DeVito reads as such:

“The only man able to take the throne after Hugh Jackman. We believe that if Wolverine is to make an appearance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe that the only man able to pull it off is Danny DeVito.”

Fans who are supporting the cause have also been posting comments of encouragement on the page, with one writing, “It's f***ing Danny DeVito, enough said,” and another posting, “This is the most important cause I've ever supported.”

Now that Disney has acquired 21st Century Fox, the X-Men could be welcomed into the MCU in the near future, which leaves most of the mutants’ fates hanging in the balance until Marvel Studios finds a way of incorporating them into their already-vast cinematic universe.

Jackman, who first played Wolverine in 2000, holds the record for longest career as a live-action superhero at a whopping 17 years. But he hung up his Adamantium claws in 2017 following the release of James Mangold's Logan. Though the position is currently vacant, we're not sure how much say these fans will have in who is cast next—though only time (and perhaps more signatures) will tell.

This petition isn’t the only one making headlines lately. The call to have Game of Thrones season 8 remade with “competent writers” recently passed the 1 million mark in signatures, and even caught the attention of the show’s stars (who are definitely not on board).

[h/t NME]

A Massive $2.5 Million Comic Collection Has Been Donated to the University of South Carolina

Mario Tama, Getty Images
Mario Tama, Getty Images

When Columbus, Ohio, native Gary Watson was a boy, he purchased his first comic book, a Zorro title, for 10 cents. Over 60 years later, his massive collection of comics—full of Marvel heroes like Spider-Man and the Avengers as well as romance titles and other genres—is worth an estimated $2.5 million. And he recently donated all of it to the University of South Carolina, where it will soon be on public view.

College representatives spoke about the acquisition with the Post and Courier last week. Watson, now 69, decided to hand off his entire collection—which includes key titles like Avengers #1, Amazing Fantasy #15, Fantastic Four #1, and a slew of other comics and books totaling 180,000 items—after deciding it could be better served as part of a university collection. He wanted to keep everything he had amassed intact instead of selling it off piecemeal to private collectors. He settled on the University of South Carolina after other colleges failed to promise the donation would be kept together.

His decades-long collection was made possible, he said, by being a lifelong bachelor with plenty of disposable income. Because of the sheer volume, it will be years before the entire donation is fully cataloged. But the public will be able to view part of it much sooner.

The school’s Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections plans to exhibit several of the pieces in the Thomas Cooper Library beginning August 29, with accompanying lectures by historians and comics creators, as well as other special events. Researchers will also be able to access the collection, which provides insight into cultural topics and concerns from their respective eras. Watson’s collection stretches from the 1930s to the present day and fills more than 500 long boxes, which typically hold 250 to 300 comics each.

[h/t The Verge]

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