Searching for a New Gig? The Cities With the Highest Job Growth in Each State, Mapped

iStock/gerenme
iStock/gerenme

Want to go where the jobs are? You don't necessarily need to move all the way across the country. A new analysis spotted by Thrillist identifies the city in each state where the most jobs have been created over the last five years, and some of the places with the biggest growth may surprise you.

The map below comes from the cost information site How Much, which used employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to track job growth between 2013 and 2018 in 381 metropolitan areas.

Overall, smaller or mid-sized cities seem to be where business is booming. In Austin, Texas, where job growth stands at 18.4 percent, the main driver of high-wage jobs recently has been the professional and business service sectors, according to Forbes. Similarly, Reno, Nevada, saw an 18 percent spike in jobs, largely due to growth in the city’s manufacturing, information, and business service industries.

The highest job growth, however, is happening in Louisiana. Since 2013, Lake Charles, Louisiana, has seen a 28.3 percent spike in job creation, the highest of any city in the country. (By comparison, New York City's job growth was just 5.3 percent.) The boom hasn't produced gains across all industries, though. Most job growth in Lake Charles over the last five years has occurred in the mining, logging, and construction industries, Thrillist notes. A planned $872 million power plant will likely bring even more jobs to the area in the future.

As How Much explains, more jobs don't necessarily mean higher wages. Five of the country's top 10 metro areas for job growth have median household incomes under $60,000. For instance, Elkhart, Indiana, which is known for manufacturing and supplying RVs, currently has one of the country's highest job growth rates, at 24 percent, but its median household income is only $58,960. Of the top job-growth cities, Austin's median household income is the highest, at $73,800.

Check out the How Much map below to see where new jobs are being added in your state, and explore the full data here.

A map of the U.S. showing the top city for job growth in each state
How Much

[h/t Thrillist]

12 Unique Sleeping Habits Around the World

iStock.com/YinYang
iStock.com/YinYang

Want to take naps at work without getting into trouble? Move to Japan. The practice of inemuri—which roughly translates to “sleeping on duty” or “sleeping while present”—is surprisingly well accepted.

It’s just one of the unique sleeping habits featured in a new infographic from Plank by Brooklyn Bedding. Created in recognition of National Sleep Awareness Month (which is happening right now), it includes information about sleeping patterns and behaviors around the world, from the healthy to the not-so-healthy.

Japan appears in the infographic a couple of times. In addition to sleeping on thin tatami mats, the habit of dozing off in public or at work is regarded as “a show of how tired a person is from working so hard,” according to the bedding company. While it’s certainly a symptom of an overworked culture, it’s also a luxury in some ways. Because of the country’s low crime rate, Japanese commuters can typically sleep on the subway without worrying about their belongings being stolen.

Beyond Asia, the practice of “al fresco naps” in Scandinavian countries are another cultural quirk. Many parents take their babies and toddlers outside to sleep in the winter—even in temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s because the fresh air is believed to keep them healthy and ward off illness. They also believe outdoor naps improve the quality and duration of their sleep.

In Australia, Aboriginal communities engage in “group sleep”—essentially large slumber parties, but with a more practical purpose. “Beds or mattresses are lined up in a row with the strongest people sleeping on the ends, protecting young children or elderly in the middle,” Brooklyn Bedding writes.

Check out the infographic below to learn more about sleep habits around the world, including the reason why 30 percent of people in the UK sleep naked.

A sleep habits infographic
Plank by Brooklyn Bedding

Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant

Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas.

And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work.

You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

This article originally ran in 2015.

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