20 Killer Words Every True Crime Buff Should Know

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iStock.com/PaulFleet

Whether we're preparing ourselves for the worst or we just love a good mystery, many of us can't get enough true crime content. True crime intersects with different fields like law, medicine, and forensics—all of which have their own vocabularies that can be hard for people on the outside to decode. Before binging The Staircase or Making a Murderer, brush up on these important terms every true crime fan should be familiar with.

1. COLD CASE

In legalese, a cold case describes a crime that remains unsolved, but isn't being actively investigated due to lack of evidence. The murder of JonBenét Ramsey, the D.B. Cooper hijacking, and the Jack the Ripper killings are all famous examples of cold cases.

2. LATENT PRINT

Crime scene investigator dusting door for prints.
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A latent print is a fingerprint made of the sweat and oil from one's skin (rather than blood or something more visible). Crime scene investigators usually need powders or chemicals to identify this type of print.

3. BLOOD SPATTER

Blood spatter is the pattern of bloodstains left at a violent crime scene. It's such important evidence in murder cases that there's an entire area of forensics dedicated to studying it. In theory, by analyzing the pattern of blood stains in a crime scene, the investigator can determine important details about the crime committed. But in recent years blood spatter analysis has been criticized. A 2009 report declared that it can give useful information about certain aspects of a crime, but that “the uncertainties associated with bloodstain pattern analysis are enormous” and that “the opinions of bloodstain pattern analysts are more subjective than scientific.”

4. PETECHIAL HEMORRHAGING

Cause of death isn't always obvious in murder cases. When looking at a potential strangulation victim, investigators examine their eyes for petechial hemorrhaging, or the tiny red dots that appear as a result of bleeding beneath the skin. Petechial hemorrhaging isn't a sure sign that someone has been choked to death, but it is likely to appear when the blood vessels in someone's head have been subjected to severe pressure.

5. MASK OF SANITY

Ted Bundy, Charles Manson, John Wayne Gacy—these serial killers were famous not only for their crimes, but their deceptively charming dispositions. This is what crime experts refer to as the Mask of Sanity. Coined by psychiatrist Hervey M. Cleckley in his 1941 book, this describes the phenomena of psychopaths easily blending in with their peers because they don't typically suffer from more noticeable mental symptoms like hallucinations and delusions.

6. MACDONALD TRIAD

The phrase Macdonald Triad first appeared in a paper by J. M. Macdonald published in a 1963 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. It refers to the three behaviors that, if exhibited in childhood, may indicate one's tendencies toward violence later in life. Those behaviors are animal cruelty, fire-starting, and chronic bed-wetting. While many prominent murderers have checked these boxes, experts today are skeptical of using this as a metric to identify future serial killers.

7. RIGOR MORTIS

Rigor mortis occurs when a body stiffens up a few hours after death as a result of calcium build-up in the joints and muscles. This can last a few days, and is one of the clues crime scene investigators use to determine when a murder took place.

8. ANGEL OF DEATH

"Angel of death" is the name given to medical professionals who intentionally kill their patients. In some cases the killer has convinced themselves they're helping the victim by choosing to end their life, which is why they're sometimes called "angels of mercy."

9. BLACK WIDOW

Female murderers are rare—they comprise just 15 percent of serial killers—but not unheard of. Women who commit murder are sometimes dubbed Black Widows after the spiders that devour their own mates after copulating. The moniker is usually reserved for a woman who targets people close to her, kills for personal gain, or uses her femininity to her advantage when committing the crime.

10. LUMINOL

Luminol reacting in glass.
deradrian, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Luminol is a chemical that emits a blue glow when mixed with a certain oxidizing agent. One of the substances that triggers this reaction is hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein found in red blood cells. By spraying a violent crime scene with luminol, investigators can detect traces of blood that aren't visible to the naked eye.

11. GLASGOW SMILE

The Black Dahlia murderer mutilated Elizabeth Short before leaving her remains in a Los Angeles park in 1947. The wounds that would come to symbolize the case were two cuts connecting her ears to the corners of her mouth, giving her the appearance of a perpetual grin. Dubbed a Glasgow Smile because of its prevalent use among Scottish gangs in the 1920s and '30s, this mark has appeared in numerous murder cases since.

12. GUNSHOT RESIDUE

Gunshot residue (GSR) is made up of the propellant particles that are discharged during a gunshot. It often settles on the clothing of anyone who was within a few feet of a fired gun, and it can be an essential piece of evidence when connecting suspects to a crime.

13. BRAIN FINGERPRINTING

Recently featured in season 2 of Making a Murderer, brain fingerprinting is a relatively new practice in crime investigations. After a suspect is hooked up to a helmet that senses brain activity, they're given details about the alleged crime that only the perpetrator would know. If they recognize what's being described, the sensor is supposed to pick up the telltale electrical signals in their brain. While what research there is suggests that the technology may be more reliable than a polygraph test, there still haven't been enough studies to prove its validity.

14. JOHN/JANE DOE

In the world of crime, John or Jane Doe are the names given to a murder victim whose identity is being concealed from the public. These names are often used as placeholders in court cases.

15. MÜNCHAUSEN SYNDROME BY PROXY

Like Münchausen syndrome, people with Münchausen syndrome by proxy manufacture trauma to gain sympathy—but instead of harming themselves they choose people who are close to them as their victims. People with this condition might intentionally make their children sick or disabled, which sometimes leads to their death.

16. COPYCAT CRIME

A copycat crime occurs when the perpetrator is inspired by a different crime, whether it was depicted in a book, movie, or TV show or it happened in real-life. Investigators sometimes have trouble distinguishing between copycat killings and the acts of a single serial murderer.

17. TROPHY

Many serial killers collect "trophies" from their victims after committing a crime. These can be fairly innocuous, like jewelry and footwear, or as gruesome as body parts. Ed Gein—the real-life inspiration for the novel and movie Psycho—used the human souvenirs he kept from his murders to make clothing and furniture.

18. BALLISTICS

Gun at crime scene.
iStock.com/FireAtDusk

Ballistics is the study of the mechanics of firearms. In forensics, this science can help investigators identify gun deaths and determine where and how the weapon was used in a crime—and possibly who pulled the trigger. Though, in the past few years, the ability of ballistics to provide a definite answer has been called into question, with courts preferring "more likely than not" statements.

19. FORENSIC ENTOMOLOGY

One of the more unusual careers for someone who studies bugs is that of a forensic entomologist. These scientists look at how insects interact with crime scenes. Based on what type of bugs are hanging around a corpse and which stage of development they're in, a forensic entomologist can help investigators determine a time of death.

20. LOCARD'S EXCHANGE PRINCIPLE

Put simply, Locard's exchange principle is "with contact between two items, there will be an exchange." Twentieth-century forensic scientist Dr. Edmond Locard came up with this idea after observing that criminals will almost always bring something into the crime scene with them and leave something behind, providing valuable evidence to investigators.

The Sea Waif: A Murder on the Ocean and the Little Girl Who Stayed Alive

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iStock.com/jaminwell

It began with a man in a boat and a little girl in a raft. On November 13, 1961, the tanker Gulf Lion was plying the waters of the Northwest Providence Channel in the Bahamas when it crossed paths with a small dinghy towing a life raft. The man in the dinghy shouted up to an officer on the tanker, identifying himself as Julian Harvey, captain of the ketch Bluebelle. The little girl in the raft, he said, was Terry Jo Duperrault, and she was dead.

Harvey, a handsome war hero and charter boat captain, was hauled aboard the tanker, where he told his harrowing tale. He'd been taking the Duperrault family of Green Bay, Wisconsin, back to Florida after a week-long cruise through the Bahamas on the Bluebelle when a squall struck in the middle of the previous night. It damaged the yacht's mainmast so badly the post plunged straight through the cabin and hull of the boat, taking another mast with it and rupturing gas lines in the engine room, which caused a fire to break out. Harvey said his passengers—the five-member Duperrault family and his own wife, Mary Dene—were either caught in the felled rigging or jumped overboard as the Bluebelle went down.

It was the same story he'd tell Coast Guard investigators three days later in even greater detail; he described emptying two fire extinguishers onto the flames with little effect and, once in the dinghy, how he shouted over and over into the squall, trying to locate the other passengers. When he did spot little Terry Jo, she was floating face down in the water in her life jacket, already dead.

It was a horrific tale, to be sure. There was just one problem: At the very moment Harvey was telling his story to the crew of the Gulf Lion, the real Terry Jo was clinging to a small life raft several miles away, slowly withering under a murderous tropical sun.

 

Terry Jo was in many ways your average 11-year-old girl. In the 2010 book Alone: Orphaned on the Ocean, co-authored by psychologist Richard D. Logan and Terry Jo (who now goes by Tere Fassbender), the authors describe a pretty blonde girl who loved animals and her family and enjoyed spending time in the wooded areas around her home in Green Bay, pretending to be Tarzan swinging through the forest. In fact, up until November 12, 1961, her life was the very model of mid-century, middle-class bliss.

The week on the Bluebelle had been a trial run for a months-long, round-the-world voyage Terry Jo's father, Dr. Arthur Duperrault, had planned for the family. The Duperrault patriarch was an accomplished sailor in his own right, having frequently traversed the waters of Green Bay. But he was looking for something more ambitious for his family, which included his wife, Jean, their 14-year-old son, Brian, and daughters Rene, aged 7, and Terry Jo. So he packed them in the car and drove down to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where he chartered the ketch Bluebelle from owner Harold Pegg, destination: The Bahamas. Their captain and tour guide would be Julian Harvey, accompanied by his sixth wife, Mary Dene.

Terry Jo had spent the week in the Bahamas snorkeling and spearfishing through crystal waters, exploring tiny, uninhabited islands, and dining on fresh seafood with locals. The vacation seemed like it would be one to remember, even if it was just a prelude to a grander adventure.

As the Bluebelle began its return journey to Florida on Sunday night, November 12, Terry Jo descended into the small cabin she shared with her sister below deck. The rest of the family—including Rene—stayed in the cockpit, the children napping, the adults, including Harvey and his wife, savoring the last dregs of their vacation. At around 11 p.m., something startled Terry Jo from her sleep.

"Help, Daddy, help!"

It was her brother, Brian, screaming. There were sounds of running and stamping. Paralyzed with fear, Terry Jo stayed in her bed for many minutes, finally working up the courage to get out of her berth to see what was happening. What she found just outside the door would be enough to sink the most hardened heart: her mother and brother lying dead, in a pool of blood. As she descended into shock, Terry Jo ascended to the deck, where the lights on the boat illuminated the figure of Julian Harvey walking toward her.

"What happened?" she asked. Harvey angrily shoved her back down the companionway, but the brief exchange had given Terry Jo enough time to notice that nothing else was amiss on the boat: no downed rigging, no splintered masts. Even the weather was calm. Later in life, an interview under sodium amytal would prompt Terry Jo to remember seeing blood and a knife on deck, but in that moment, there was too much to keep track of.

Blue waves and bubbles
iStock.com/borchee

Terry Jo returned to the cabin, where she huddled in her bed. She heard the sounds of sloshing water, and soon, oily bilge water began to creep into her room. Suddenly, Harvey's frame filled up the doorway. He stood for a long time looking at her with what seemed to be a rifle in his hands, while she shrunk against the wall and held her breath. After an agonizing moment, he turned and ascended to the deck. The little girl remained frozen until the water crested the bunk. The Bluebelle was sinking.

As she waded through the foul water quickly filling the cabin, Terry Jo must have prayed she wouldn't bump into what would now be the floating bodies of her mother and brother. Back up on deck, she saw that Harvey had launched the dinghy and life raft, and shouted to him, "Is the ship sinking?" He confirmed it was and shoved the line holding the dinghy into her hands, but it slipped through. When he realized his escape vehicle was drifting away, he dove into the sea, leaving the girl alone to die in the dark on the rapidly capsizing sailboat.

 

Nearly everyone who heard Julian Harvey's story found something off about it. Some crew members of the ship that picked him up found him far too calm and collected for someone who just lost his wife and an entire family of clients and nearly escaped death. The Bluebelle's owner, Harold Pegg, found Harvey's account of the mast failure preposterous, given that the ketch had been recently inspected and cleared. Even Harvey's old friend James Boozer, who heard multiple, varying iterations of Harvey's story, felt there were holes.

Anyone with a birds-eye-view of Julian Harvey's life would have found a few other elements not in his favor. While it was true that Harvey was a skilled WWII bomber pilot, served in the Korean War, and even managed to pull off a dangerous test flight of a modified B-24 bomber, peers in the military periodically noted his propensity for ditching missions due to "engine failure." By the end of his career in the military, even his supporters noted his nerves were shot—a fact apparently made clear by the worsening of a facial tic and stutter.

Anchored sailboat in blue waters, view from drone 
iStock.com/mbbirdy

Then there were the wives. Mary Dene Jordan was the sixth, and until her, Harvey had a habit of wooing, rapidly marrying, and then abruptly dumping his partners, usually with a cursory "I don't love you anymore." His affairs were legend at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, where Harvey was stationed with his second (or possibly third) wife Joan in 1949. They'd soon turn darker. One rainy night, Harvey was driving his wife and mother-in-law back from the movies when, as he described it, his car swerved on a bridge and rolled over the side into the bayou below. The car sank, and Harvey alone survived. As bystanders dove into the water to look for Mrs. Harvey and her mother, the pilot calmly described, perhaps even boasted, about how he'd been able to escape the car while it was mid-air. Not only did evidence at the scene point to that not being the case, but it was apparent that Harvey had made no attempt to save his relatives. Nor did he seem overly broken up about their deaths. He soon cashed in his wife's life insurance policy.

Finally, the Bluebelle wasn't the first boat to sink under Harvey's watch. Twice before Harvey had filed insurance claims for destroyed boats. Both cases, while suspicious, were decided in his favor. Later, friends would admit that in the first wreck, Harvey had probably steered the boat into an obstacle on purpose, and in the case of the second, had flat-out admitted to setting his vessel on fire.

But Harvey's history was largely unknown to the Coast Guard investigators who interviewed him three days post-rescue. He repeated what was broadly the same story he told the crew of the Gulf Lion, but under the questioning of investigators, holes began to appear.

For one, the idea of a mast plunging straight through the deck of a sailboat was unlikely; masts broken by squall winds tilt over, rather than fall straight down. Harvey asserted that after the mast failure, he had asked Dr. Duperrault to steer the Bluebelle while he went to find cable cutters to cut through the downed rigging. As the fire broke out in the engine room and spread up through the cockpit, the course he'd asked Duperrault to follow—into the wind—actually began fanning the flames. Yet, he insisted, Duperrault kept steering in the same direction—an inconceivable move for any person of common sense, let alone a Navy veteran and experienced sailor like Arthur Duperrault.

There was also the fact that no one at the lighthouse on a nearby island saw a fire at sea that night, nor did Harvey try to make it over to that island after he found the body of who he thought was Terry Jo, but was actually 7-year-old Rene, and placed it on the raft. Finally, and perhaps most tellingly, Harvey, the sailboat captain, admitted that at no point during his hours of drifting did he think to look for the flares that were in the dinghy's emergency kit.

In the long run, Harvey's dark history and tortured tale wouldn’t much matter. Just as he was wrapping up his testimony for investigators, a captain of the Coast Guard rushed into the room. In a scene out of a police procedural, he broke the news: They'd found a survivor.

 

Terry Jo had been on the ocean for three and a half days when she was picked up by a Greek freighter. By then, she was hours from death, if not closer—severely dehydrated, badly sunburned, mostly unconscious. The fact that she was alive at all—that she'd managed to find, launch, and hold on to a small cork-and-rope life raft as the Bluebelle sank; that she hadn't fallen off or been attacked by a predator; that she was even able to give her name to the crew of the ship that found her despite her body largely shutting down—it was all a miracle.

Within a month, the image of her tiny frame surrounded by a vast blue expanse, captured by a crewman with a camera on the ship that found her, would be familiar to readers of LIFE magazine the world over; Terry Jo's photo and story was featured in a spread alongside news of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in New Guinea. By then, she'd be home with her aunt, uncle, cousins, and grandmother in Wisconsin, trying to achieve some kind of normalcy. It would be decades, however, before she'd talk about what happened to anyone other than the Coast Guard investigators who interviewed her in her Miami hospital room.

Motel entrance at night
iStock.com/ImageegamI

"Oh, my God!" is what Harvey said when he found out about Terry Jo's rescue. After a few moments regaining his composure, he commented on how wonderful the news was and then abruptly exited the room, leaving puzzled investigators in his wake.

The next day, the manager at the Sandman Motel in Miami called the police after the maid smelled something funny in the bathroom of Room 17 and couldn’t get the door open. Behind the door was the corpse of Julian Harvey, handsome as ever but covered in self-inflicted slash wounds. He'd left a note addressed to his friend James Boozer: "I'm a nervous wreck and just can't continue. I'm going out now. I guess I either don't like life or don't know what to do with it." The message also arranged for the adoption of Harvey's son, and requested that Harvey's body be buried at sea.

After two interviews, in which her story never deviated, the Coast Guard came to accept Terry Jo's version of events that night on the Bluebelle. In his book on the incident, Richard D. Logan theorized that Harvey had murdered his wife in their cabin on the Bluebelle that night, possibly for insurance money, and intended to tell the Duperraults she'd fallen overboard. She'd put up more of a fight than he expected, alerting Dr. Duperrault, who went to investigate. Harvey stabbed Duperrault with the knife that Terry Jo would later remember seeing on the deck, then killed Mrs. Duperrault and Brian. Little Rene most likely drowned, although it has never been made clear whether she fell, was thrown overboard, or was forcibly held under by Harvey before he dragged her into the lifeboat tied to his dinghy.

Terry Jo received support from all over the world after her story broke. She went on to live a full life; she fell in love, had children and grandchildren, moved around, and found work she loved with Wisconsin's Department of Natural Resources as a Water Management Specialist. Call it ironic, call it fate, but Terry found her life's mission protecting bodies of water. In the afterword of the book she co-authored with Logan, she wrote:

What I want to stress to all who read this book is never give up, always have hope, and try to look on the bright side of things. Be positive, be trusting, and try to go with the flow; have compassion, give of yourself to those in need, and be loving and kind. I believe that what you give comes back to you.

Julian Harvey was buried at sea per his wishes.

You Can Explore Al Capone's Newly Recreated Cell at Eastern State Penitentiary

Courtesy of Eastern State Penitentiary
Courtesy of Eastern State Penitentiary

In 1929, infamous organized crime figure Alphonse “Al” Capone was incarcerated in Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary for possessing an unlicensed and concealed firearm. Capone was released in 1930—though he would famously go to federal prison on tax evasion charges only two years later. Eastern State Penitentiary closed in 1970, reopening in 1994 as a historic site that lets visitors explore prison life (though not prison food, thankfully).

While the prison has always made note of Capone’s cell, the facility has just launched an exhibit that recreates how Capone lived at the prison more accurately than ever before, according to the Associated Press.

A recreation of Al Capone's cell at Eastern State Penitentiary
Courtesy of Eastern State Penitentiary

Work began in January 2019 to restore and repaint the plaster walls of Capone's original cell. In the process, further research indicated that certain details of Capone’s stay—like the fact that he had a roommate—would need to be incorporated into the design. A cot was added and some items were removed after it was discovered that the cell was not as luxuriously furnished as some reports had indicated at the time. Rather than boasting of expensive furniture, his cell likely consisted of a prison-made rug, a dresser, a table, a flower vase, and a smoking stand.

The restoration work uncovered more than just Capone’s lack of privacy. While preparing the walls, workers uncovered a considerable amount of paint schemes covering the surface that indicated an attempt to paint artwork or change the color of the walls. Not wanting to cover the evidence of inmate artistry back up, Capone’s recreated cell was moved to the next cell over.

Visitors can view both at Eastern State, which is open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

[h/t PennLive]

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