Amsterdam Is Home to a Houseboat Full of Cats—and You Can Pet Them All

Some people can only dream of living on a houseboat in Amsterdam, but that's the reality for dozens of feral and abandoned cats in the city. As Mic reports, De Poezenboot, or The Catboat, provides shelter to about 50 cats in need of homes—and guests can visit the floating animal sanctuary for free.

The shelter was founded in 1968, when a cat lover named Henriette van Weelde purchased a Dutch sailing barge to house the growing number of rescue cats she had taken in. The barge was eventually replaced with the Dutch houseboat that's docked in the canal today. The vessel provides heating in the winter and beds, boxes, and scratching posts to keep cats happy and comfortable. They have access to the outside deck any time of year, and there's even a fence to keep them from swiping at duck chicks in the water.

Weelde passed away in 2005 at age 90. Today the shelter is managed by Judith Gobets, who worked under Weelde for years, and maintained by a team of volunteers. In addition to caring for and feeding the cats, they also make sure every cat that comes to them is sterilized, micro-chipped, and vaccinated.

Tourists and locals in Amsterdam are free to see The Catboat and its feline residents in person from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. everyday except Wednesdays and Sundays. Visitors can help the shelter by making a suggested donation, or by taking home one of the pets that are up for adoption.

[h/t Mic]

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Massive Swarms of Migrating Dragonflies Are So Large They’re Popping Up on Weather Radar

emprised/iStock via Getty Images
emprised/iStock via Getty Images

What do Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Ohio all have in common? Epic swarms of dragonflies, among other things.

WSLS-TV reports that this week, weather radar registered what might first appear to be late summer rain showers. Instead, the green blotches turned out to be swarms of dragonflies—possibly green darners, a type of dragonfly that migrates south during the fall.

Norman Johnson, a professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, told CNN that although these swarms happen occasionally, they’re definitely not a regular occurrence. He thinks the dragonflies, which usually prefer to travel alone, may form packs based on certain weather conditions. If that sounds vague, it’s because it is: Johnson said that entomologists haven’t worked out all the details when it comes to dragonfly migration. They do know that the airborne insects cover an average of eight miles per day, while some overachievers can fly as far as 86.

Based on the radar footage shared by the National Weather Service’s Cleveland Office, the dragonfly clouds seem almost menacing. But, while swarms of any insect species aren’t exactly delightful, these creatures are both harmless and surprisingly beautiful, at least up close. Anna Barnett, a resident of Jeromesville, Ohio, even told CNN that witnessing the natural phenomenon was “amazing!”

Amazing as it may be to see, it’s hard to hear news about unpredictable animal behavior without wondering if it’s related in some way to Earth’s rising temperatures. After all, climate change has already affected wasps in Alabama, polar bears in Russia, and no doubt countless other animal species around the world.

[h/t WSLW-TV]

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